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March 6th 09, 09:06 PM
My wife just called with the test results - kidney failure. The cat
seems comfortable today but eats nothing and does not move.
in fairness to the holistic vet, she divined kidney trouble when we
brought her in in December - no tests but she said she could feel it
by palpating (sp). I took a dim view - she seemed to be trying to
hustle us into buying her very expensive brand of dog food. Offering
acupuncture and homeopathic meds didn't give me any confidence.
Anyway, she was as right as $200 in tests.
The cat was active, spry, until a very few days ago.
We will decide what to do tonight - dax

cshenk
March 7th 09, 01:53 PM
> wrote

> My wife just called with the test results - kidney failure. The cat
> seems comfortable today but eats nothing and does not move.

Sorry to hear that. I lost a kitty that way. It was quiet and painless and
he was too old for any effective treatment. He'd had it for some time but
not shown any sysptoms until really too late.

> in fairness to the holistic vet, she divined kidney trouble when we
> brought her in in December - no tests but she said she could feel it
> by palpating (sp). I took a dim view - she seemed to be trying to

Actually, they can in advanced cases tell just by feeling. Nothing holistic
about it.

> The cat was active, spry, until a very few days ago.
> We will decide what to do tonight - dax

Good luck and I bet you can find some information by google on it, then take
the cat to a regular vet to see if they can do anything. In the case of
mine, he was just too old and it was too advanced he said. We let him pass
quietly at home, age 19. Just like yours, quite spry then a very sudden
downturn.

March 7th 09, 03:22 PM
On Mar 7, 7:53*am, "cshenk" > wrote:
> > wrote
>
> > My wife just called with the test results - kidney failure. The cat
> > seems comfortable today but eats nothing and does not move.
>
> Sorry to hear that. *I lost a kitty that way. *It was quiet and painless and
> he was too old for any effective treatment. *He'd had it for some time but
> not shown any sysptoms until really too late.
>
> > in fairness to the holistic vet, she divined kidney trouble when we
> > brought her in in December - no tests but she said she could feel it
> > by palpating (sp). I took a dim view - she seemed to be trying to
>
> Actually, they can in advanced cases tell just by feeling. *Nothing holistic
> about it.
>
> > * The cat was active, spry, until a very few days ago.
> > * We will decide what to do tonight - dax
>
> Good luck and I bet you can find some information by google on it, then take
> the cat to a regular vet to see if they can do anything. *In the case of
> mine, he was just too old and it was too advanced he said. *We let him pass
> quietly at home, age 19. *Just like yours, quite spry then a very sudden
> downturn.

we are being offered benzapril/fortekor and will give it a try tho she
is not eating. also subcutaneous ringer's saline. Given the late
stage, it isn't clear what help this will be. Any further comments
appreciated - dax

cshenk
March 7th 09, 07:38 PM
> wrote
"cshenk" wrote:

> > The cat was active, spry, until a very few days ago.
> > We will decide what to do tonight - dax

>we are being offered benzapril/fortekor and will give it a try tho she
>is not eating. also subcutaneous ringer's saline. Given the late
>stage, it isn't clear what help this will be. Any further comments
>appreciated - dax

Best I can say is age of the cat seems a big one for this on recovery.
There's a huge difference in a 8 year old and a 19 year old on this one.
You have not mentioned the gae of the cat so I can tell little on that
score. Most cats though, 15 is a good run. Seems to be about equal to 90
or so for a human.

One of the good things for all cats (oddly saw one today at the local place
that looiks for homes who drinks *too much* water and needs to be
controlled) is to get a bit more water in them. Seems endemic to the
population. It's one of the reasons why some insist on only wet food
feeding a cat. They cant get the cat to 'drink' and dry food only makes
that worse.

If that is related, my own trick has stood me in good stead but it's not a
quick fix then stop doing it sort of thing. Just like us, a cat's health is
affected by long term issues.

I've had several cats with renal issues in my younger years. Some, sadly
because I fed them cheapest dry all their lives (i didnt know better then).
I've not had a single cat with any renal or cystistis (sp?) problems since
starting a really basic way to get water in them. This one may help you, if
not now, in the future.

I make stock at home out of 'home knawed bones' in a crockpot. It's just a
leftover chicken carcass etc, tossed in with water. Set on low for several
hours and the broth develops. It has natural chondritin (helps their
joints) and smells good to them (and us).

I then give this daily in 2-3 TB amounts with a little added meat bit (1 TS
or so) as a mid-day noshe. I've had cats that would not 'drink' any other
water so upped it to 1/4 cup along the day. Make it salt and onion free.
You can add salt an onion to your own batch later (grin).

Cats are 'meatarians' and like *meat* broth. They are not as salt tolerant
as we are so you need a salt free broth. Feel free to run this by your vet.
Several have and no one has objected while many have been vocal about loving
the idea.

Daisy will benefit from this as she's young enough to really show it. She's
only edging up on 3 years now.

March 7th 09, 08:38 PM
On Mar 7, 1:38*pm, "cshenk" > wrote:
> > wrote
>
> "cshenk" wrote:
> > > The cat was active, spry, until a very few days ago.
> > > We will decide what to do tonight - dax
> >we are being offered benzapril/fortekor and will give it a try tho she
> >is not eating. also subcutaneous ringer's saline. Given the late
> >stage, it isn't clear what help this will be. Any further comments
> >appreciated - dax
>
> Best I can say is age of the cat seems a big one for this on recovery.
> There's a huge difference in a 8 year old and a 19 year old on this one.
> You have not mentioned the gae of the cat so I can tell little on that
> score. *Most cats though, 15 is a good run. *Seems to be about equal to 90
> or so for a human.
>
> One of the good things for all cats (oddly saw one today at the local place
> that looiks for homes who drinks *too much* water and needs to be
> controlled) is to get a bit more water in them. *Seems endemic to the
> population. *It's one of the reasons why some insist on only wet food
> feeding a cat. *They cant get the cat to 'drink' and dry food only makes
> that worse.
>
> If that is related, my own trick has stood me in good stead but it's not a
> quick fix then stop doing it sort of thing. *Just like us, a cat's health is
> affected by long term issues.
>
> I've had several cats with renal issues in my younger years. *Some, sadly
> because I fed them cheapest dry all their lives (i didnt know better then).
> I've not had a single cat with any renal or cystistis (sp?) problems since
> starting a really basic way to get water in them. *This one may help you, if
> not now, in the future.
>
> I make stock at home out of 'home knawed bones' in a crockpot. *It's just a
> leftover chicken carcass etc, tossed in with water. *Set on low for several
> hours and the broth develops. *It has natural chondritin (helps their
> joints) and smells good to them (and us).
>
> I then give this daily in 2-3 TB amounts with a little added meat bit (1 TS
> or so) as a mid-day noshe. *I've had cats that would not 'drink' any other
> water so upped it to 1/4 cup along the day. *Make it salt and onion free.
> You can add salt an onion to your own batch later (grin).
>
> Cats are 'meatarians' and like *meat* broth. *They are not as salt tolerant
> as we are so you need a salt free broth. *Feel free to run this by your vet.
> Several have and no one has objected while many have been vocal about loving
> the idea.
>
> Daisy will benefit from this as she's young enough to really show it. *She's
> only edging up on 3 years now.

thank you for this, cshenk. Chicken stock coming up. This cat likes to
drink, and has lately been hanging out in the sink, which should have
been a clue. We will try her with dedicated renal-care canned food
too.
She's only seven. She has always been a featherweight but now she is
hardly there. Her litter-sister (a shorthair nothing like her) is a
burly brute.