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March 10th 09, 12:17 PM
Now that spring is just around the corner, some of you might be
itching to do the traditional Spring Cleaning, usually a good thing.
But your cats may not think so:

Liquid Lysol (or any phenol-based disinfecting cleaner): Harmful or
fatal to cats of all sizes from Tigers to domestics in any
concentration including residue for several days after application.
This cleaner should not even be in the same county as a cat, much less
your residence.

Pine-Oil based cleaners (containing Terpenes): As above, but very
slightly less toxic and not toxic if rinsed and fully dry. If you can
keep your cats away from areas cleaned with these materials for a full
24 hours they may be used with great caution. They are better just
avoided. If you are on a septic system and a well, just don't use them
at all.

Cleaners containing Triclosan: There is mixed information in the
literature about this compound - suffice it to say that it is now
being found in Human mother's milk, is persistent (does not break down
natually) and causes thyroid complications when tested on rats. There
are many alternatives as well.

Bleach, alcohol-based compounds and Ammonia (not all together, of
course): About the best general cleaners available when combined with
appropriate detergents and the dangerous compounds in them are highly
volatile, objectionable to cats and not persistent. Windex contains
alcohol and ammonia, Clorox contains bleach for two examples. If your
cats have a normal sense of smell (for them), they will avoid these
compounds naturally if they are in sufficient concentration to be
harmful.

Murphy's Soaps, Dr. Bonner's Soaps and similar: Good if used as
directed. Not terribly strong which may be a good thing.

Petroleum-based waxes (Butcher's Paste Wax, many car-waxes): Keep cats
away for at least 12 hours after application to allow the hydrocarbons
to evaporate. Or use a water-based product.

House Paints (Oil and Latex): Keep cats away during application and
for 24 hours until fully cured. True also of all non-water-based
caulks, glues, stains and varnishes.

Broad-spectrum Pesticides and Chemical Fertilizers: Nearly every one
of these compounds is toxic to cats in one way or another and must be
used with great caution indoors and out - or not at all if possible.

Most of you already know this, of course.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

March 10th 09, 01:26 PM
Don't forget about air fresheners of any kind (spray, plug ins, etc.).
These are filled with all sorts of chemicals. One of our cats has
asthma and I have stopped using air fresheners in the house.

dgk
March 11th 09, 12:19 PM
On Tue, 10 Mar 2009 05:17:20 -0700 (PDT), "
> wrote:

>Now that spring is just around the corner, some of you might be
>itching to do the traditional Spring Cleaning, usually a good thing.
>But your cats may not think so:
>
>Liquid Lysol (or any phenol-based disinfecting cleaner): Harmful or
>fatal to cats of all sizes from Tigers to domestics in any
>concentration including residue for several days after application.
>This cleaner should not even be in the same county as a cat, much less
>your residence.
>
>Pine-Oil based cleaners (containing Terpenes): As above, but very
>slightly less toxic and not toxic if rinsed and fully dry. If you can
>keep your cats away from areas cleaned with these materials for a full
>24 hours they may be used with great caution. They are better just
>avoided. If you are on a septic system and a well, just don't use them
>at all.
>
>Cleaners containing Triclosan: There is mixed information in the
>literature about this compound - suffice it to say that it is now
>being found in Human mother's milk, is persistent (does not break down
>natually) and causes thyroid complications when tested on rats. There
>are many alternatives as well.
>
>Bleach, alcohol-based compounds and Ammonia (not all together, of
>course): About the best general cleaners available when combined with
>appropriate detergents and the dangerous compounds in them are highly
>volatile, objectionable to cats and not persistent. Windex contains
>alcohol and ammonia, Clorox contains bleach for two examples. If your
>cats have a normal sense of smell (for them), they will avoid these
>compounds naturally if they are in sufficient concentration to be
>harmful.
>
>Murphy's Soaps, Dr. Bonner's Soaps and similar: Good if used as
>directed. Not terribly strong which may be a good thing.
>
>Petroleum-based waxes (Butcher's Paste Wax, many car-waxes): Keep cats
>away for at least 12 hours after application to allow the hydrocarbons
>to evaporate. Or use a water-based product.
>
>House Paints (Oil and Latex): Keep cats away during application and
>for 24 hours until fully cured. True also of all non-water-based
>caulks, glues, stains and varnishes.
>
>Broad-spectrum Pesticides and Chemical Fertilizers: Nearly every one
>of these compounds is toxic to cats in one way or another and must be
>used with great caution indoors and out - or not at all if possible.
>
>Most of you already know this, of course.
>
>Peter Wieck
>Melrose Park, PA


Of course it's all perfectly safe for us!

March 11th 09, 12:54 PM
On Mar 11, 8:19*am, dgk > wrote:

> Of course it's all perfectly safe for us!

Last I looked, we don't clean ourselves with our tongues - well,
perhaps you do.

And some few of us can read - and actually use that skill to read
labels.

And some fewer of us understand what we are reading.

Yet fewer actually follow label directions.

Yet fewer again do some basic research before using chemicals.

But, we are still most of us somewhat different than our cats who
often choose not to read or follow label directions.

Perfection is reserved to the deity of one's choice. The rest of us
muddle along as best we can and understand that risk is inherent with
every activity including breathing. We just don't let it paralyze us
or, worse, ruin our fun - and life should be at least that, hopefully
a great deal more.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

dgk
March 12th 09, 12:42 PM
On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 05:54:39 -0700 (PDT), "
> wrote:

>On Mar 11, 8:19*am, dgk > wrote:
>
>> Of course it's all perfectly safe for us!
>
>Last I looked, we don't clean ourselves with our tongues - well,
>perhaps you do.
>
>And some few of us can read - and actually use that skill to read
>labels.
>
>And some fewer of us understand what we are reading.
>
>Yet fewer actually follow label directions.
>
>Yet fewer again do some basic research before using chemicals.
>
>But, we are still most of us somewhat different than our cats who
>often choose not to read or follow label directions.
>
>Perfection is reserved to the deity of one's choice. The rest of us
>muddle along as best we can and understand that risk is inherent with
>every activity including breathing. We just don't let it paralyze us
>or, worse, ruin our fun - and life should be at least that, hopefully
>a great deal more.
>
>Peter Wieck
>Melrose Park, PA


I prefer that other people do the licking.

And I can't say that I know the safety of the cleaning stuff but I
tend to distrust it. Thus, my house doesn't pass the Spic 'N Span test
but Roomba keeps the floor reasonably cat hair free. I'm sure that at
least one of the chemicals in my toilet bowl cleaner causes cancer in
paramecium.

Hmm. SInce cancer is an overgrowth of cells, I suppose a single-celled
creature is immune to cancer. Or it becomes twins.

March 12th 09, 07:20 PM
On Mar 12, 8:42*am, dgk > wrote:

> Hmm. SInce cancer is an overgrowth of cells, I suppose a single-celled
> creature is immune to cancer. Or it becomes twins.

There is a school of thought that has some considerable merit that
suggests that as cancer is an accretion of mutated cells, complex life
forms such as people represent what happens when one-celled life forms
become cancerous.

There is a Charles Addams cartoon - two amoebas at the bottom of the
last ocean after a nuclear holocaust deciding whether to get together
to start over. One says to the other: OK, only this time, no brains.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

dgk
March 13th 09, 12:20 PM
On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 12:20:22 -0700 (PDT), "
> wrote:

>On Mar 12, 8:42*am, dgk > wrote:
>
>> Hmm. SInce cancer is an overgrowth of cells, I suppose a single-celled
>> creature is immune to cancer. Or it becomes twins.
>
>There is a school of thought that has some considerable merit that
>suggests that as cancer is an accretion of mutated cells, complex life
>forms such as people represent what happens when one-celled life forms
>become cancerous.
>
>There is a Charles Addams cartoon - two amoebas at the bottom of the
>last ocean after a nuclear holocaust deciding whether to get together
>to start over. One says to the other: OK, only this time, no brains.
>
>Peter Wieck
>Melrose Park, PA

Great idea. But then who would serve the cats?

Lynne
March 14th 09, 10:22 PM
wrote:
> Now that spring is just around the corner, some of you might be
> itching to do the traditional Spring Cleaning, usually a good thing.
> But your cats may not think so:

Thank you for this reminder. What about Simple Green? I use this now
and assumed it is safe but realized that I don't know.

By the way, for tubs, sinks, windows, mirrors and some walls, I now use
those magic erasers (though I get a store brand). No chemicals needed
and they work very well!

cybercat
March 14th 09, 11:42 PM
"Lynne" > wrote
that I don't know.
>
> By the way, for tubs, sinks, windows, mirrors and some walls, I now use
> those magic erasers (though I get a store brand). No chemicals needed and
> they work very well!

I LOVE these things. They are magical on matte finish walls. Man!

March 15th 09, 10:34 PM
On Mar 14, 6:22*pm, Lynne > wrote:

> Thank you for this reminder. *What about Simple Green? *I use this now
> and assumed it is safe but realized that I don't know.

http://www.simplegreen.com/pdfs/09A_msds_simple_green_pad.pdf

It is safe.

But, if you have any doubts about any chemicals or cleaners, MSDS are
available by law from the maker - and very nearly all of them are
available on-line with just a simple Google Search.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

---MIKE---
March 16th 09, 11:56 AM
Is Swiffer "wet jet" a safe cleaner (after it dries}?


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Lynne
March 17th 09, 02:27 AM
wrote:
> On Mar 14, 6:22 pm, Lynne > wrote:
>
>> Thank you for this reminder. What about Simple Green? I use this now
>> and assumed it is safe but realized that I don't know.
>
> http://www.simplegreen.com/pdfs/09A_msds_simple_green_pad.pdf
>
> It is safe.
>
> But, if you have any doubts about any chemicals or cleaners, MSDS are
> available by law from the maker - and very nearly all of them are
> available on-line with just a simple Google Search.
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA

Peter, thank you! I'll be sure to check anything else I might use,
though I think with the vinegar and water for the floors and the simple
green or magic erasers for pretty much everything else, we're good!

Now if someone could tell me how Rudy developed retractable thumbs, I'd
be set. The little sneak can open baby locks and food storage bins!
Caught him with his whole front in the dog food bin just snacking away!
I've already changed all the door knobs in this house...

March 18th 09, 07:35 PM
On Mar 16, 7:56*am, (---MIKE---) wrote:
> Is Swiffer "wet jet" a safe cleaner (after it dries}?
>
> * * * * * * * * * ---MIKE--->>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>
> *>> (44 15' *N - Elevation 1580')

Yes. And, for the record, Swiffer All Purpose Cleaner is ~5% alcohol
(ethanol) and ~95% plain water. The rest of it (the ~ part) is perfume
and dye where used. Just like Windex (alcohol, ammonia, dye water) you
are paying for the trademark, advertising, convenience and packaging -
NOT for the actual contents of the bottle.

Or, you could go to Google and seach on [chemical/compound of your
choice] + MSDS and follow the links.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

March 18th 09, 07:47 PM
On Mar 16, 10:27*pm, Lynne > wrote:

> Peter, thank you! *I'll be sure to check anything else I might use,
> though I think with the vinegar and water for the floors and the simple
> green or magic erasers for pretty much everything else, we're good!

It helps to understand a bit of chemistry. Your Magic Erasers are made
of:

Formaldehyde-Melamine-Sodium bisulfite copolymer

Seeing that mouthful on paper is a bit intimidating considering the
toxicity of formaldehyde and melamine as proven out so recently. But
just as Sodium and Chlorine in their pure, uncombined states are
pretty nasty chemicals, when combined they are remarkable stable and
inert. *BUT* the lesson to be taken from this is that the magic
erasers *MUST NOT* be disposed of by fire or around strong oxidizing
or reducing compounds - in your house that would include ammonia,
Drano, bleach, oven cleaners, and so forth that will cause the
ingredients to be released.


Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Lynne
March 21st 09, 06:11 PM
wrote:
>
> It helps to understand a bit of chemistry. Your Magic Erasers are made
> of:
>
> Formaldehyde-Melamine-Sodium bisulfite copolymer
>
> Seeing that mouthful on paper is a bit intimidating considering the
> toxicity of formaldehyde and melamine as proven out so recently. But
> just as Sodium and Chlorine in their pure, uncombined states are
> pretty nasty chemicals, when combined they are remarkable stable and
> inert. *BUT* the lesson to be taken from this is that the magic
> erasers *MUST NOT* be disposed of by fire or around strong oxidizing
> or reducing compounds - in your house that would include ammonia,
> Drano, bleach, oven cleaners, and so forth that will cause the
> ingredients to be released.
>
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA

Oh, dear! Well this is very good to know. Thanks again, Peter.