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Cazz A
March 12th 09, 07:01 AM
All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens was
claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and excess to
the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I reclaimed him
and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he also had fleas.

The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for any
harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
for each of the 11 cats.
How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a hot
water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do anything
to help the cats any more?

cyberpurrs
March 12th 09, 07:38 AM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
...
> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens was
> claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and excess to
> the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I reclaimed him and
> later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he also had fleas.
>
> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my cats.
> The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for any harmful
> bacteria that might decide to move in.
> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15 for
> each of the 11 cats.
> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a hot
> water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do anything to
> help the cats any more?

Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
afford vet care.

Cazz A
March 12th 09, 10:16 AM
cyberpurrs wrote:
>
> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
> ...
>> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens
>> was claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and
>> excess to the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I
>> reclaimed him and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he
>> also had fleas.
>>
>> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
>> cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for
>> any harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
>> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
>> for each of the 11 cats.
>> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a
>> hot water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do
>> anything to help the cats any more?
>
> Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
> afford vet care.
Um, the shelter is where the flu came from, and they'd all be killed
within 24 hours because of the flu if I surrendered them now.

Fact is, even if I was a millionare I'd be looking for a cheaper option.
I don't think it's fair on the cats to be put in a travel cage for an
hour of travel just to hear what I already know and be prescribed a 1ml
syringe full of meds...give me a break, nothing deserves that! I'm just
looking for something that will help them, not something that will help
after the bacteria have moved in.

dgk
March 12th 09, 01:35 PM
On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 20:16:29 +1100, Cazz A
> wrote:

>cyberpurrs wrote:
>>
>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens
>>> was claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and
>>> excess to the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I
>>> reclaimed him and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he
>>> also had fleas.
>>>
>>> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
>>> cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for
>>> any harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
>>> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
>>> for each of the 11 cats.
>>> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a
>>> hot water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do
>>> anything to help the cats any more?
>>
>> Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
>> afford vet care.
>Um, the shelter is where the flu came from, and they'd all be killed
>within 24 hours because of the flu if I surrendered them now.
>
>Fact is, even if I was a millionare I'd be looking for a cheaper option.
>I don't think it's fair on the cats to be put in a travel cage for an
>hour of travel just to hear what I already know and be prescribed a 1ml
>syringe full of meds...give me a break, nothing deserves that! I'm just
>looking for something that will help them, not something that will help
>after the bacteria have moved in.

They should be fine once the cold goes away since the antibiotics are
just preventative. I used to be a microbiologist and hated hearing
that someone was getting antibiotics "just in case". If any don't seem
to be recovering, get antibiotics for that one. Adult cats should be
fine otherwise but you should check my advice with the vet.

But, watch out for worms. Those are transmitted by fleas as I recall,
and the only time my cats got fleas (many years ago) they also got
worms.

cybercat
March 12th 09, 04:42 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 20:16:29 +1100, Cazz A
> > wrote:
>
>>cyberpurrs wrote:
>>>
>>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens
>>>> was claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and
>>>> excess to the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I
>>>> reclaimed him and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he
>>>> also had fleas.
>>>>
>>>> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
>>>> cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for
>>>> any harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
>>>> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
>>>> for each of the 11 cats.
>>>> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a
>>>> hot water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do
>>>> anything to help the cats any more?
>>>
>>> Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
>>> afford vet care.
>>Um, the shelter is where the flu came from, and they'd all be killed
>>within 24 hours because of the flu if I surrendered them now.
>>
>>Fact is, even if I was a millionare I'd be looking for a cheaper option.
>>I don't think it's fair on the cats to be put in a travel cage for an
>>hour of travel just to hear what I already know and be prescribed a 1ml
>>syringe full of meds...give me a break, nothing deserves that! I'm just
>>looking for something that will help them, not something that will help
>>after the bacteria have moved in.
>
> They should be fine once the cold goes away since the antibiotics are
> just preventative. I used to be a microbiologist and hated hearing
> that someone was getting antibiotics "just in case". If any don't seem
> to be recovering, get antibiotics for that one. Adult cats should be
> fine otherwise but you should check my advice with the vet.
>
> But, watch out for worms. Those are transmitted by fleas as I recall,
> and the only time my cats got fleas (many years ago) they also got
> worms.

You're talking to a budding hoarder. Her local government already seized
some of her cats.

Matthew[_3_]
March 12th 09, 05:00 PM
"Cazz A" >

I want you to read something and pay close attention to it. You should seek
proper veterinary advice or treatment when your cat or kitten becomes ill

How to get your cat healthy and happy again
Watching your cat or kitten suffer from cat flu is a stressful and
unpleasant experience.
There's nothing worse than seeing your beloved pet enduring the symptoms of
cat flu while you look on helplessly.
The most obvious signs of the condition are a runny nose, respiratory
difficulties, sneezing and swollen and runny eyes.
Your cat will seem thoroughly sick and miserable, lacking in energy and not
eating, playing and exploring as normal.
Humans cannot catch flu from their cats so there's no risk of you becoming
ill too when your pet catches cat flu or cat cold.

It's also worth noting that cats and kittens cannot catches colds or flu
from their owners.
Two feline viruses cause most cases of cat flu and the condition will
normally last for seven to 10 days. Some cats are infected as kittens and
the virus stays with them and flares up throughout their lives.
But thankfully there are plenty of cat flu vaccines, medications and
treatments available which will get your cat fit and healthy again as
quickly as possible including some popular products here.
It's simply a case of learning a bit about the subject and taking the right
course of action.
Vets often recommend antibiotics for the problem - but sometimes this is the
wrong course of action since cat flu is a virus and antibiotics can often
prove ineffective cures or remedies.
They've even been known to aggravate the condition with reactions to
antibiotics causing new problems like diarrhea, vomiting and even liver
disease. Just like their owners, cats and kittens can suffer from a wide
range of health problems including cat colds, distemper, cat sneezing,
vomiting, leptospirosis, stomach flu, cat diarrhea, eye infections, fleas,
leukemia, diarrhea, kidney failure, ear mites, mange, hair loss and
dandruff.
Cat flu can be really nasty, even fatal in kittens, and your pet needs all
the care and attention you can give when it falls victim to it.
It is usually caused by one of two viruses - feline herpes or FHV-1 (which
is also known as feline viral rhinotracheitis or FVR) and feline calici
virus (FCV).
When they are infected cats will start to shed virus particles by way of
saliva and eye and nasal discharges. Healthy cats can carry the virus and
infect other cats by shedding the virus particles.
The virus is easily spread via infected toys or food bowls and even on the
clothes of those who have come into contact with an infected cat.
Attentive nursing of an infected cat is crucial because some of symptoms -
such as mouth ulcers of a blocked nose - can prevent drinking or eating,
often leading to dehydration.
This site won't have the answers to all your questions but hopefully if you
browse around you'll find help and advice on many areas of concern about
your favourite feline - not just the dreaded cat flu causes, symptoms,
treatment and cure. And there's also plenty of discussion about general cat
health matters including cat litter, grooming, urine problems, feeding and
diet, vomiting, spraying, allergies and behaviour, as well as information
about common cat diseases and illnesses.

Information contained in this post is for reference only and is not intended
to provide professional diagnosis or consultation
.. You should seek proper veterinary advice or treatment when your cat or
kitten becomes ill

Cat Flu is the common name given to a group of viruses, which affect the
upper respiratory tract in cats.
Healthy cats are normally able to cope with the illness and it is not
usually fatal, but it can be much nastier and dangerous to kittens and cats
with a weaken immune system.
Anyway we all know how unpleasant the flu can be in ourselves, so it is
something that we should try and protect our pets from catching it in the
first place.
What is cat flu and how is it spread?
The illness itself is normally caused by the Feline Herpes Virus - 1 (FHV-1)
or Feline Calicivirus (FCV).
The disease affects the eyes, nose, mouth and windpipe. In severe cases it
may even spread to the lungs and bronchi.
The viruses are spread much in the same way as human colds. Via sneezing and
contact with the discharges.
It can also be spread via cat food bowls, grooming brushes and bedding. In
fact because some of the viruses can live for a short while outside of the
cats body in the environment, it is a good idea to thoroughly clean the home
environment.
The use of household bleach mixed with water is advisable on washable items.
Cats infected with the flu should be kept separate from other animals to
prevent spreading the disease and although humans cannot catch the disease
from them, we may help spread it from one animal via our hands. It is
important that we do not handle the sick cat often and always thoroughly
wash our hands when we do.
The symptoms

If you notice your cat displaying any of the following symptoms, you should
take them to the vets immediately to have the illness diagnosed
professionally and treated quickly.
Sneezing
Red swollen eyes
Discharge from the eyes or nose
Loss of appetite due to loss of smell
Depression and general lack lustre in behaviour
Mouth ulcers
Drooling
Joint pain, your cat finds it difficult to move around
The symptoms of cat flu can last between 7 and 14 days depending on the
strain of virus.


The Treatment
Viral infections cannot be cured but the symptoms can be managed. Depending
on the symptoms your cat is showing your vet may prescribe, eye drops and or
antibiotics.
In severe cases where the cat cannot eat or drink due to mouth ulcers, your
vet may want to keep your cat at the clinic so that they can be fed
intravenously.
As a caring cat owner the best thing to do is to try and keep your cat as
comfortable as possible.
Make sure they have a warm and comfortable place to sleep


Swab eye and nose discharges with salt water (one teaspoon of salt to one
pint of water)
Try to keep the room well ventilated and not stuffy (you may even want to
place a bowl of steamy water near them to try and help them breath, but
never leave your cat alone with hot water)
Make sure there is plenty of clean fresh water available and try to
encourage them to drink often.
Food, water and the litter try may have to be placed closer to the cat if
they are suffering from joint pain. (When Little Mo had the flu, she could
hardly walk for two days).
Provide very smelly foods like pilchards because they may have a reduced
sense of smell, and cut them up into small pieces
A little cream or ice cream may also tempt them to eat, as it may sooth sore
throats.
Keep the environment quiet and stress free
Prevent cat Flu in the first place
Once a cat has cat flu they may become a carrier of the disease which may
either make them sick again in the future even if they have not come in to
contact with another sick cat, or they may infect other cats.
This is one of the main reasons for having your healthy cat vaccinated
against the disease, as you can never be sure which cats they come into
contact with, you may even inadvertently spread the disease yourself by
stroking a seemingly healthy cat who may be carrying the illness.
The vaccine for cat flu can be given either separately or as a combined
vaccine for other infectious diseases.

Your vet will discuss this with you at your visit

James
March 12th 09, 05:08 PM
On Mar 12, 11:42*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 20:16:29 +1100, Cazz A
> > > wrote:
>
> >>cyberpurrs wrote:
>
> >>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>>> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens
> >>>> was claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and
> >>>> excess to the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I
> >>>> reclaimed him and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he
> >>>> also had fleas.
>
> >>>> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
> >>>> cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for
> >>>> any harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
> >>>> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
> >>>> for each of the 11 cats.
> >>>> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a
> >>>> hot water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do
> >>>> anything to help the cats any more?
>
> >>> Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
> >>> afford vet care.
> >>Um, the shelter is where the flu came from, and they'd all be killed
> >>within 24 hours because of the flu if I surrendered them now.
>
> >>Fact is, even if I was a millionare I'd be looking for a cheaper option..
> >>I don't think it's fair on the cats to be put in a travel cage for an
> >>hour of travel just to hear what I already know and be prescribed a 1ml
> >>syringe full of meds...give me a break, nothing deserves that! I'm just
> >>looking for something that will help them, not something that will help
> >>after the bacteria have moved in.
>
> > They should be fine once the cold goes away since the antibiotics are
> > just preventative. I used to be a microbiologist and hated hearing
> > that someone was getting antibiotics "just in case". If any don't seem
> > to be recovering, get antibiotics for that one. Adult cats should be
> > fine otherwise but you should check my advice with the vet.
>
> > But, watch out for worms. Those are transmitted by fleas as I recall,
> > and the only time my cats got fleas (many years ago) they also got
> > worms.
>
> You're talking to a budding hoarder. Her local government already seized
> some of her cats.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Some become hoarders because well meaning fools think there are always
someone to give an unwant pet a loving home. Long time ago someone
posted a picture of barrels full of dead cats from the shelter.

It was not too long ago when people didn't go to human doctors but
nurse themself back to health with folk remedies. All CAZZ A is
asking for is some info.

Cazz A
March 13th 09, 12:52 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
>> On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 20:16:29 +1100, Cazz A
>> > wrote:
>>
>>> cyberpurrs wrote:
>>>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> All of my cats have cat flu. It all started when one of the kittens
>>>>> was claimed by my local council and claimed to be unregistered and
>>>>> excess to the limit (the council's limit is 3 cats and 2 dogs). I
>>>>> reclaimed him and later noticed that not only did he have cat flu, he
>>>>> also had fleas.
>>>>>
>>>>> The fleas are not a problem. The flu has been transferred to all my
>>>>> cats. The kitten was prescribed antibiotics, not for the flu but for
>>>>> any harmful bacteria that might decide to move in.
>>>>> I know of the dangers of overusing antibiotics, and I can't afford $15
>>>>> for each of the 11 cats.
>>>>> How can I ease the problem for them? I've been giving the kittens a
>>>>> hot water bottle wrapped in polar fleece every 12 hours, can I do
>>>>> anything to help the cats any more?
>>>> Take them to a shelter where they might be rehomed with people who can
>>>> afford vet care.
>>> Um, the shelter is where the flu came from, and they'd all be killed
>>> within 24 hours because of the flu if I surrendered them now.
>>>
>>> Fact is, even if I was a millionare I'd be looking for a cheaper option.
>>> I don't think it's fair on the cats to be put in a travel cage for an
>>> hour of travel just to hear what I already know and be prescribed a 1ml
>>> syringe full of meds...give me a break, nothing deserves that! I'm just
>>> looking for something that will help them, not something that will help
>>> after the bacteria have moved in.
>> They should be fine once the cold goes away since the antibiotics are
>> just preventative. I used to be a microbiologist and hated hearing
>> that someone was getting antibiotics "just in case". If any don't seem
>> to be recovering, get antibiotics for that one. Adult cats should be
>> fine otherwise but you should check my advice with the vet.
>>
>> But, watch out for worms. Those are transmitted by fleas as I recall,
>> and the only time my cats got fleas (many years ago) they also got
>> worms.
>
> You're talking to a budding hoarder. Her local government already seized
> some of her cats.
>
Of course I'm a budding hoarder, but then, isn't everyone to some
degree? The council ranger claimed one kitten, if I thought he'd be
better off with fleas and cat flu, I would've left him there. The kitten
wasn't malnourished or starved of anything, he was taken because he was
excess to council law, no other reason.

Thanks for the advice about worms, I'll keep an eye out.

cybercat
March 13th 09, 04:24 AM
"Cazz A" > wrote
>>
> Of course I'm a budding hoarder, but then, isn't everyone to some degree?
> The council ranger claimed one kitten, if I thought he'd be better off
> with fleas and cat flu, I would've left him there. The kitten wasn't
> malnourished or starved of anything, he was taken because he was excess to
> council law, no other reason.


You don't give your cats regular vet care. That's grounds enough. Rehome
them.

Cazz A
March 13th 09, 07:35 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Cazz A" > wrote
>> Of course I'm a budding hoarder, but then, isn't everyone to some degree?
>> The council ranger claimed one kitten, if I thought he'd be better off
>> with fleas and cat flu, I would've left him there. The kitten wasn't
>> malnourished or starved of anything, he was taken because he was excess to
>> council law, no other reason.
>
>
> You don't give your cats regular vet care. That's grounds enough. Rehome
> them.
>
>
Funny, I can't ask a question without accusations flying. They get vet
care when it's needed. I knew that treating a viral infection with an
antibiotic doesn't even sound right to me. The vets here are WAY
overcharging - $50 for the consult and whatever they charge for the meds
PER CAT. You try paying that!

Or cybercat, are you referring to the kind of vet care that my dog has
severe reactions to? He was taken to the vet for his vaccination. I told
the vet about his reaction to his previous vaccination, she told me it
was a once off, he wouldn't react so badly again. It took 4 hours to get
home he was in so much pain.

dgk
March 13th 09, 01:17 PM
On Thu, 12 Mar 2009 12:00:15 -0400, "Matthew"
> wrote:

>
>"Cazz A" >
>
>I want you to read something and pay close attention to it. You should seek
>proper veterinary advice or treatment when your cat or kitten becomes ill
....
>
>Your vet will discuss this with you at your visit
>

I guess my cats have never had the Cat Flu. Once in a great while one
seems like it has a cold and off to the vet they go, but nothing like
that Flu. Still, outside of the cat version of cough medicine there
doesn't seem to be all that much you can do once they get it.

The last time one got a cold I called the vet and he said that if it
got worse to bring him in but otherwise he'd be fine, and fine he was.
But he was still playing and seemed normal except for the sneezing and
slight mucous.

It's sometimes a tough call on whether to take them to the vet. I hate
paying the money, but the bigger part is that the cats really get
stressed. Usually I call the vet and ask what I should do.

Cazz A
March 13th 09, 01:21 PM
Thanks Matthew, that was very useful.

> Swab eye and nose discharges with salt water (one teaspoon of salt to one
> pint of water)
I've been using warmed water on a cotton bud from my first aid kit. How
much water's in a pint? Sorry, in Australia, everything's metric!

> Try to keep the room well ventilated and not stuffy (you may even want to
> place a bowl of steamy water near them to try and help them breath, but
> never leave your cat alone with hot water)
I didn't think of the bowl, Lu joined me in the bathroom for a shower(I
left him curled under a towel, but he decided to save me from the awful
wet stuff!

> Provide very smelly foods like pilchards because they may have a reduced
> sense of smell, and cut them up into small pieces
I give them tinned 'Seafood Delight' food. It doesn't have all the sick
kitties need, but because the flu's not permanent, I don't think it
matters, does it?

> A little cream or ice cream may also tempt them to eat, as it may sooth sore
> throats.
Would cat milk(the lactose free stuff) accomplish the same goal?

> Keep the environment quiet and stress free
> Prevent cat Flu in the first place
This bit I really don't understand. Is there any real way to prevent it?
Aren't their viruses like humans, a fact of life? If I have a carrier of
this flu and all my cats have it, wouldn't the non carriers be immune to
catching it again until it mutates and some other cat brings the mutated
virus back to my colony?

> Once a cat has cat flu they may become a carrier of the disease which may
> either make them sick again in the future even if they have not come in to
> contact with another sick cat, or they may infect other cats.
> This is one of the main reasons for having your healthy cat vaccinated
> against the disease, as you can never be sure which cats they come into
> contact with, you may even inadvertently spread the disease yourself by
> stroking a seemingly healthy cat who may be carrying the illness.
Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
from killing the cat.

> The vaccine for cat flu can be given either separately or as a combined
> vaccine for other infectious diseases.
>
> Your vet will discuss this with you at your visit
>
>

dejablues[_4_]
March 13th 09, 01:31 PM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
u...
>
> Thanks Matthew, that was very useful.
>
>> Swab eye and nose discharges with salt water (one teaspoon of salt to one
>> pint of water)
> I've been using warmed water on a cotton bud from my first aid kit. How
> much water's in a pint? Sorry, in Australia, everything's metric!
>
>> Try to keep the room well ventilated and not stuffy (you may even want to
>> place a bowl of steamy water near them to try and help them breath, but
>> never leave your cat alone with hot water)
> I didn't think of the bowl, Lu joined me in the bathroom for a shower(I
> left him curled under a towel, but he decided to save me from the awful
> wet stuff!
>
>> Provide very smelly foods like pilchards because they may have a reduced
>> sense of smell, and cut them up into small pieces
> I give them tinned 'Seafood Delight' food. It doesn't have all the sick
> kitties need, but because the flu's not permanent, I don't think it
> matters, does it?
>
>> A little cream or ice cream may also tempt them to eat, as it may sooth
>> sore throats.
> Would cat milk(the lactose free stuff) accomplish the same goal?
>
>> Keep the environment quiet and stress free
>> Prevent cat Flu in the first place
> This bit I really don't understand. Is there any real way to prevent it?
> Aren't their viruses like humans, a fact of life? If I have a carrier of
> this flu and all my cats have it, wouldn't the non carriers be immune to
> catching it again until it mutates and some other cat brings the mutated
> virus back to my colony?
>
>> Once a cat has cat flu they may become a carrier of the disease which may
>> either make them sick again in the future even if they have not come in
>> to contact with another sick cat, or they may infect other cats.
>> This is one of the main reasons for having your healthy cat vaccinated
>> against the disease, as you can never be sure which cats they come into
>> contact with, you may even inadvertently spread the disease yourself by
>> stroking a seemingly healthy cat who may be carrying the illness.
> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
> stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
> from killing the cat.

Is there a proper name for this illness? "Cat flu" probably not very
accurate.

dejablues[_4_]
March 13th 09, 01:38 PM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
u...
> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
> stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
> from killing the cat.

Have you been vaccinated for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella,
hepatitis? These are all caused by viruses and they are prevented by
vaccines. You have the vaccine, you do not get the disease, except in rare
instances. Cats get vaccines for FeLV , calcivirus, rabies, and
panleukopenia, which are all caused by viruses.
Good hygiene prevents secondary bacterial infections, and good care prevents
them from being fatal.

cybercat
March 13th 09, 04:30 PM
"dgk" > wrote
>
> It's sometimes a tough call on whether to take them to the vet. I hate
> paying the money, but the bigger part is that the cats really get
> stressed. Usually I call the vet and ask what I should do.

What is it, $40 max for an exam and medicine? One reason for erring on the
side of taking the cats in too often is that when they feel bad, or cannot
smell well due to congestion, they can stop eating and get into trouble
really fast.

Anybody here who aids and abets the morons like Cazz A who come in here
asking for ways to make themselves feel better about denying their cats the
health care they need are just as bad as the morons.

cybercat
March 13th 09, 04:35 PM
"dejablues" > wrote
> Is there a proper name for this illness? "Cat flu" probably not very
> accurate.

This stupid bitch is talking about an upper respiratory infection, the kind
that can kill cats in no time if they stop eating.

cybercat
March 13th 09, 04:37 PM
"dejablues" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
> u...
>> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
>> stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
>> from killing the cat.
>
> Have you been vaccinated for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella,
> hepatitis? These are all caused by viruses and they are prevented by
> vaccines. You have the vaccine, you do not get the disease, except in rare
> instances. Cats get vaccines for FeLV , calcivirus, rabies, and
> panleukopenia, which are all caused by viruses.
> Good hygiene prevents secondary bacterial infections, and good care
> prevents them from being fatal.
>
She has 11 cats. What's a dead one here or there? There are plenty more
where that one came from. They always find dead animals and really sick
animals among the population of hoarders, if only because they don't have
the sense to only take on the number of animals they can properly care for.
Cazz is patting herself on the back for coming in here and asking, that's
real love, you know. Half those cats, at least, should be rehomed.

cshenk
March 13th 09, 04:52 PM
"cybercat" wrote
> "dejablues" wrote

>> Is there a proper name for this illness? "Cat flu" probably not very
>> accurate.
>
> This stupid bitch is talking about an upper respiratory infection, the
> kind that can kill cats in no time if they stop eating.

Dropping the name calling, yes you may well be right. The worst thing is 11
cats in one house. There is a time when a sensible person says 'sure the
cat is cute but I cant afford the medical bills for another' so stop
adopting more.

My daughter wants to add another cat to our existing 1 cat and 1 dog home.
I told her no and reminded her not only of finances to pay for care if the
cat got sick, but the conversation when we adopted Daisy-cat. Daisy is not
emotionally suited to living with other cats. It's well on record from 5
different temp homes when they were trying to find her a final one.

In a multi-cat home she hides, sulks, acts up (including litter issues),
scratches, and occasionally attacks the other cats unless they are extremely
submissive to her. Thats why she had 5 temp homes in 18 months and not one
offer of adoption.

Now Dogs? She loves them. Weird cat (grin). Kids (2 foot types) hates'em
except can tolerate the older ones and loves Charlotte.

Yes, I can afford their medical bills. It's tight but not that tight. I
did shift Daisy's flea stuff though to Frontline which was 1/2 the cost of
the other stuff.

dejablues[_4_]
March 13th 09, 05:34 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "dejablues" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>> u...
>>> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
>>> stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
>>> from killing the cat.
>>
>> Have you been vaccinated for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella,
>> hepatitis? These are all caused by viruses and they are prevented by
>> vaccines. You have the vaccine, you do not get the disease, except in
>> rare instances. Cats get vaccines for FeLV , calcivirus, rabies, and
>> panleukopenia, which are all caused by viruses.
>> Good hygiene prevents secondary bacterial infections, and good care
>> prevents them from being fatal.
>>
> She has 11 cats. What's a dead one here or there? There are plenty more
> where that one came from. They always find dead animals and really sick
> animals among the population of hoarders, if only because they don't have
> the sense to only take on the number of animals they can properly care
> for. Cazz is patting herself on the back for coming in here and asking,
> that's real love, you know. Half those cats, at least, should be rehomed.

Ugh. I troll Petfinder.com, and there are several cage-free rescue groups in
my area that put forth the statement that if you adopt one of their cats,
you will have to agree treat them for Feline Upper Respiratory Disease :
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18639946
If there are a lot of cats on one place, there will be URTD.

The OP needs to stop calling it "kitty flu", treat the cats properly or
rehome them if he/she cannot, and stop bringing new cats into the
environment.

Cazz A
March 14th 09, 12:52 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "dejablues" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>> u...
>>> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do is
>>> stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary infection
>>> from killing the cat.
>> Have you been vaccinated for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella,
>> hepatitis? These are all caused by viruses and they are prevented by
>> vaccines. You have the vaccine, you do not get the disease, except in rare
>> instances. Cats get vaccines for FeLV , calcivirus, rabies, and
>> panleukopenia, which are all caused by viruses.
>> Good hygiene prevents secondary bacterial infections, and good care
>> prevents them from being fatal.
>>
> She has 11 cats. What's a dead one here or there? There are plenty more
> where that one came from. They always find dead animals and really sick
> animals among the population of hoarders, if only because they don't have
> the sense to only take on the number of animals they can properly care for.
> Cazz is patting herself on the back for coming in here and asking, that's
> real love, you know. Half those cats, at least, should be rehomed.
>
>
You know what? Lu had a home before this crap with the RSPCA started. NO
cat is released from my house without at least being desexed. Roma has
a potential home since last night, an answer to one of my 4 adverts. Lu
will be desexed in 4 weeks, that's the first appointment I could get for
him(I had to wait 6 weeks for the other desexings).

I have talked to a vet(not my usual) who does housecalls, she'll be here
tomorrow.

No, actually I'm not patting myself on the back. I came here looking for
people who'd been through this before and could add their perspective to
my vet's diagnosis and prescription, but all you do is throw insults at me.

cybercat
March 14th 09, 12:59 AM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>> "dejablues" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>>> u...
>>>> Isn't it impossible to vaccinate against a virus? All vaccinations do
>>>> is stop the virus from being fatal, that doesn't stop a secondary
>>>> infection from killing the cat.
>>> Have you been vaccinated for polio, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella,
>>> hepatitis? These are all caused by viruses and they are prevented by
>>> vaccines. You have the vaccine, you do not get the disease, except in
>>> rare instances. Cats get vaccines for FeLV , calcivirus, rabies, and
>>> panleukopenia, which are all caused by viruses.
>>> Good hygiene prevents secondary bacterial infections, and good care
>>> prevents them from being fatal.
>>>
>> She has 11 cats. What's a dead one here or there? There are plenty more
>> where that one came from. They always find dead animals and really sick
>> animals among the population of hoarders, if only because they don't have
>> the sense to only take on the number of animals they can properly care
>> for. Cazz is patting herself on the back for coming in here and asking,
>> that's real love, you know. Half those cats, at least, should be rehomed.
> You know what? Lu had a home before this crap with the RSPCA started. NO
> cat is released from my house without at least being desexed. Roma has a
> potential home since last night, an answer to one of my 4 adverts. Lu will
> be desexed in 4 weeks, that's the first appointment I could get for him(I
> had to wait 6 weeks for the other desexings).
>
> I have talked to a vet(not my usual) who does housecalls, she'll be here
> tomorrow.
>
> No, actually I'm not patting myself on the back. I came here looking for
> people who'd been through this before and could add their perspective to
> my vet's diagnosis and prescription, but all you do is throw insults at
> me.

Why do you use stupid terms like "desexed" and "kitty flu?"

Cazz A
March 14th 09, 02:05 AM
>
> Why do you use stupid terms like "desexed" and "kitty flu?"
>
>
Adaptations. Spaying/neutering may be more accurate, but in the vast
scheme of things, desexing means just as much, requires much less typing
and I've learned on different lists to be mindful of my language.

Kitty flu was intended to grab attention as a subject, it wasn't
supposed to insult. I could've used 'feline influenza' as a topic
heading, but then many people would assume I'm a vet here to instruct.
I'm not, I'm just another person who's come here looking for
information. Technically correct names aren't normally used in casual
conversation, and I don't want to confuse people who may otherwise be
able to help me.

cybercat
March 14th 09, 07:32 AM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
...
>
>>
>> Why do you use stupid terms like "desexed" and "kitty flu?"
> Adaptations. Spaying/neutering may be more accurate, but in the vast
> scheme of things, desexing means just as much, requires much less typing
> and I've learned on different lists to be mindful of my language.

You're not in Kansas any more. This is Usenet. Use the correct terms so that
people know what you are talking about. Your cats have upper respiratory
infections which require a vet's care as they are really contagious and can
lead to your cats refusing to eat, which can kill them rather quickly.

Cazz A
March 14th 09, 11:11 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
> ...
>>> Why do you use stupid terms like "desexed" and "kitty flu?"
>> Adaptations. Spaying/neutering may be more accurate, but in the vast
>> scheme of things, desexing means just as much, requires much less typing
>> and I've learned on different lists to be mindful of my language.
>
> You're not in Kansas any more. This is Usenet. Use the correct terms so that
> people know what you are talking about. Your cats have upper respiratory
> infections which require a vet's care as they are really contagious and can
> lead to your cats refusing to eat, which can kill them rather quickly.

Ah Kansas...Yet another place I've never been to.
I was told by the vet who diagnosed Lu that he has flu. For an infection
I have no problems using antibiotics for, flu is a virus, antibiotics
don't help viruses, they help the secondary infections. It's actually
harmful to use antibiotics proactively, that's why I originally asked.

I've never had the flu. I had one cold before I turned twenty, had 2
since then. Why is it such a problem to ask about the effects of flu in
cats?

cybercat
March 14th 09, 04:50 PM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>> "Cazz A" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>> Why do you use stupid terms like "desexed" and "kitty flu?"
>>> Adaptations. Spaying/neutering may be more accurate, but in the vast
>>> scheme of things, desexing means just as much, requires much less typing
>>> and I've learned on different lists to be mindful of my language.
>>
>> You're not in Kansas any more. This is Usenet. Use the correct terms so
>> that people know what you are talking about. Your cats have upper
>> respiratory infections which require a vet's care as they are really
>> contagious and can lead to your cats refusing to eat, which can kill them
>> rather quickly.
>
> Ah Kansas...Yet another place I've never been to.
> I was told by the vet who diagnosed Lu that he has flu. For an infection I
> have no problems using antibiotics for, flu is a virus, antibiotics don't
> help viruses, they help the secondary infections. It's actually harmful to
> use antibiotics proactively, that's why I originally asked.
>
> I've never had the flu. I had one cold before I turned twenty, had 2 since
> then. Why is it such a problem to ask about the effects of flu in cats?

Feline influenza is viral, upper respiratory tract infections are bacterial,
for sure, but people tend to use the term "cat flu" for both things.

You can read about it here:

http://cat-care.suite101.com/article.cfm/feline_influenza

I imagine most people take their cats to the vet over this since it can
certainly kill them, and just like a bacterial infection, will indeed spread
through your entire clowder. You may easily have a few dead cats on your
hands if you don't get the affected ones competent vet care. All of your
cats need to be vaccinated. If you leave your cats untreated they can die
from pneumonia.

Cazz A
March 16th 09, 02:19 PM
People,
We're now on the tail end of the flu. 2 cats, Oscar (ex feral grump who
took a swing at a vet nurse when he went in for his vaccination and
neuter) and Toby(one of 2 undersized kittens who were dragged from under
a washing machine that killed their mum) are getting vibravet twice a day.
Thanks heaps for all the advice. In my colony of 11, we've had no
casualties, and we're not likely to.