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John Gordon
April 1st 09, 06:51 PM
The other day one of our cats was feeling poorly (vomiting and
listlessness) so we took him to the vet. Thankfully they found nothing
wrong and he was able to come home after about four hours spent there.

However, when we brought him inside the other two cats acted almost as
if we had brought a stranger into the house, hissing and growling at him.

Is this normal? I can't remember this happening before. Could he have
picked up a strange odor at the vet?

--
John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
-- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"

cybercat
April 1st 09, 06:54 PM
"John Gordon" > wrote in message
...
> The other day one of our cats was feeling poorly (vomiting and
> listlessness) so we took him to the vet. Thankfully they found nothing
> wrong and he was able to come home after about four hours spent there.
>
> However, when we brought him inside the other two cats acted almost as
> if we had brought a stranger into the house, hissing and growling at him.
>
> Is this normal? I can't remember this happening before. Could he have
> picked up a strange odor at the vet?
>

Very normal. He smells funny. Like the vet.

Matthew[_3_]
April 1st 09, 06:54 PM
Yes the furball has strange smells it should be ok in a few days.

You can quickly remedy this by taking a piece of dirty laundry and rub all
the furballs with the clothing so they have the same smell


"John Gordon" > wrote in message
...
> The other day one of our cats was feeling poorly (vomiting and
> listlessness) so we took him to the vet. Thankfully they found nothing
> wrong and he was able to come home after about four hours spent there.
>
> However, when we brought him inside the other two cats acted almost as
> if we had brought a stranger into the house, hissing and growling at him.
>
> Is this normal? I can't remember this happening before. Could he have
> picked up a strange odor at the vet?
>
> --
> John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
> B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
> -- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"
>

April 1st 09, 09:04 PM
Yes, quite normal. As the other posters said, the cat that went to the
vet smells "different" to the other cats.

You can separate them for a day or so until things settle down. As
Matthew said, you can rub a towel on all three cats to distribute the
smells.

John Gordon
April 1st 09, 10:35 PM
In > writes:

> Yes, quite normal. As the other posters said, the cat that went to the
> vet smells "different" to the other cats.

> You can separate them for a day or so until things settle down. As
> Matthew said, you can rub a towel on all three cats to distribute the
> smells.

Thanks for all the responses. I'll try rubbing him with a towel when I
get home tonight.

--
John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
-- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"

cybercat
April 1st 09, 11:06 PM
"John Gordon" > wrote in message
...
> In >
> writes:
>
>> Yes, quite normal. As the other posters said, the cat that went to the
>> vet smells "different" to the other cats.
>
>> You can separate them for a day or so until things settle down. As
>> Matthew said, you can rub a towel on all three cats to distribute the
>> smells.
>
> Thanks for all the responses. I'll try rubbing him with a towel when I
> get home tonight.
>

On behalf of all good cat parents here, I would just like to say THANK YOU
for taking your cat to the vet when he is sick.

cybercat
April 1st 09, 11:13 PM
"John Gordon" > wrote in message
...
> The other day one of our cats was feeling poorly (vomiting and
> listlessness) so we took him to the vet. Thankfully they found nothing
> wrong and he was able to come home after about four hours spent there.
>

I'm wondering: why did he have to spend four hours there?

John Gordon
April 2nd 09, 06:52 PM
In > "cybercat" > writes:

> "John Gordon" > wrote in message
> ...
> > The other day one of our cats was feeling poorly (vomiting and
> > listlessness) so we took him to the vet. Thankfully they found nothing
> > wrong and he was able to come home after about four hours spent there.

> I'm wondering: why did he have to spend four hours there?

The vet was having a somewhat busy day, so the best they could offer was
to take him in and do the blood tests, x-rays etc between other
appointments.

--
John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
-- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"

April 2nd 09, 07:31 PM
On Apr 1, 1:51*pm, John Gordon > wrote:

> Is this normal? *I can't remember this happening before. *Could he have
> picked up a strange odor at the vet?

Another Edward Gorey fan? Do you also wear red high-tops?

As to your cat, it smells of fear, chemicals and strange places. Cats
are very scent-sensitive animals and so there will be a reaction. What
is surprising is that your cat was rejected by his peers. Our big cat
wants to care for and comfort any of our animals just back from the
vet.

Before I speculate too much, do you have exactly three cats? That
would explain a lot.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

John Gordon
April 2nd 09, 09:28 PM
In > " > writes:

> As to your cat, it smells of fear, chemicals and strange places. Cats
> are very scent-sensitive animals and so there will be a reaction. What
> is surprising is that your cat was rejected by his peers. Our big cat
> wants to care for and comfort any of our animals just back from the
> vet.

> Before I speculate too much, do you have exactly three cats? That
> would explain a lot.

Yes, we have exactly three. What is special about that number?

--
John Gordon A is for Amy, who fell down the stairs
B is for Basil, assaulted by bears
-- Edward Gorey, "The Gashlycrumb Tinies"

April 3rd 09, 03:13 AM
On Apr 2, 4:28*pm, John Gordon > wrote:

> Yes, we have exactly three. *What is special about that number?

With three cats, there is always an alliance between any given two
against the third. In this particular case, the cat with the 'funny
smell' became the victim-de-jour.

For that reason, we will never have three cats, as the mix is simply
not healthy. It is either two or 'many'. And 'many' is fraught with
other dangers. So, two do for us. But when I mentioned our big male's
wish to 'mother' any of our pets recently from the vet, that is
absolutely true. And our dogs are similarly inclined. So when your cat
was rejected, the three-cat syndrome immediately came to mind.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

dgk
April 3rd 09, 01:31 PM
On Thu, 2 Apr 2009 19:13:01 -0700 (PDT), " >
wrote:

>On Apr 2, 4:28*pm, John Gordon > wrote:
>
>> Yes, we have exactly three. *What is special about that number?
>
>With three cats, there is always an alliance between any given two
>against the third. In this particular case, the cat with the 'funny
>smell' became the victim-de-jour.
>
>For that reason, we will never have three cats, as the mix is simply
>not healthy. It is either two or 'many'. And 'many' is fraught with
>other dangers. So, two do for us. But when I mentioned our big male's
>wish to 'mother' any of our pets recently from the vet, that is
>absolutely true. And our dogs are similarly inclined. So when your cat
>was rejected, the three-cat syndrome immediately came to mind.
>
>Peter Wieck
>Melrose Park, PA

I have three. Two xboys and one xgirl. I took the girl (Marlo) off the
street the previous winter when it was 8F outside. The boys were
already resident. After a few days in the Cat Introduction Room (and a
checkout and neuter at the vet) she joined them.

If there is a 2:1 alliance I sure can't see it. Any given chase around
the house involves any two of the three. Each seems to have an equal
chance of being groomed by another. That, of course, often ends in
play fighting. There is very rarely a fight serious enough to have
someone audibly complain.

The boys are both around 5 by now and Marlo is maybe 3. Nipsy is
16lbs, Espy is 10, and Marlo is 12 (and pretty chubby - she's a small
cat). The personalities are very different. Nipsy is a "Scardy cat".
Espy is a "Curiosity Killed the cat", and Marlo is somewhere between.

There's a fair amount of room since it's a house and they can
certainly get away from each other for a break, but mostly they hang
out near each other.

I've almost always had two cats and three is pushing my limit, but I
can't say there have been any cat related issues that I can ascribe to
having three.

I haven't noticed much in the way of reaction when one returns from
the vet but there is some sniffing. Still, I've read about it often
enough here to know what to do if it happens. It's hard to believe
they wouldn't recognize their own long-time housemate after a trip to
the vet, but they are all so weird.

cybercat
April 3rd 09, 04:37 PM
"dgk" > wrote :>
> I have three. Two xboys and one xgirl. I took the girl (Marlo) off the
> street the previous winter when it was 8F outside. The boys were
> already resident. After a few days in the Cat Introduction Room (and a
> checkout and neuter at the vet) she joined them.
>
> If there is a 2:1 alliance I sure can't see it.

Peter is an idiot. Figure that into the equation.

April 3rd 09, 09:00 PM
On Apr 3, 11:37*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote :>
>
> > I have three. Two xboys and one xgirl. I took the girl (Marlo) off the
> > street the previous winter when it was 8F outside. The boys were
> > already resident. After a few days in the Cat Introduction Room (and a
> > checkout and neuter at the vet) she joined them.
>
> > If there is a 2:1 alliance I sure can't see it.
>
> Peter is an idiot. Figure that into the equation.

That is as it may be. But you, old lady, are genuinely dangerous.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

cyberpurrs
April 3rd 09, 11:08 PM
> wrote in message
...
On Apr 3, 11:37 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote :>
>
> > I have three. Two xboys and one xgirl. I took the girl (Marlo) off the
> > street the previous winter when it was 8F outside. The boys were
> > already resident. After a few days in the Cat Introduction Room (and a
> > checkout and neuter at the vet) she joined them.
>
> > If there is a 2:1 alliance I sure can't see it.
>
> Peter is an idiot. Figure that into the equation.

>That is as it may be. But you, old lady, are genuinely dangerous.

Okay, I admit it, I am old. I just turned 50. But "dangerous?" You're the
asshole who doesn't take care of his cats. As I recall, you allow them to
roam, among other things. Now let's talk about how I am "dangerous." Old,
maybe. Idiot, not even. Idiots like you are far more likely to be
dangererous. You're not yet in my kf on my laptop, but you will be. Asshole.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

April 4th 09, 01:12 AM
On Apr 3, 6:08*pm, "cyberpurrs" > wrote:

> Okay, I admit it, I am old. I just turned 50.

a) you have not "killefiled" me as you have promised. Credibility in
question here.
b) I have been owned by cats for longer than you have been alive.
c) If you want me to detail your idiocies just in the last few months,
just keep at it and I will.

As to our cats going outdoors - yes, they do - and always have to the
extent that they choose. And at the same time, they have long, healthy
and extremely happy lives for all that. Until you have seen a cat
hunting, chasing, playing in the outdoors, or even fishing - yes, our
cats fish - then you cannot ever expect to understand what a cat is
when it can express all of its nature.

Get a life, please.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

cyberpurrs
April 4th 09, 03:40 AM
> wrote in message
...
On Apr 3, 6:08 pm, "cyberpurrs" > wrote:

> Okay, I admit it, I am old. I just turned 50.

a) you have not "killefiled" me as you have promised. Credibility in
question here.
b) I have been owned by cats for longer than you have been alive.
c) If you want me to detail your idiocies just in the last few months,
just keep at it and I will.


I do. Let's have it. From an asshole who allows his cats to roam
unsupervised and thinks there is some "deadly unluckiness" in having three
cats. Also, it sounds to me like you are a seriously old ****er. Contrary to
your idiotic opinion, decrepitness does not confer wisdom. You're just old
and stupid, instead of younger and stupid as you were for the rest of your
life.

dgk
April 6th 09, 02:00 PM
On Fri, 3 Apr 2009 17:12:37 -0700 (PDT), " >
wrote:

>On Apr 3, 6:08*pm, "cyberpurrs" > wrote:
>
>> Okay, I admit it, I am old. I just turned 50.
>
>a) you have not "killefiled" me as you have promised. Credibility in
>question here.
>b) I have been owned by cats for longer than you have been alive.
>c) If you want me to detail your idiocies just in the last few months,
>just keep at it and I will.
>
>As to our cats going outdoors - yes, they do - and always have to the
>extent that they choose. And at the same time, they have long, healthy
>and extremely happy lives for all that. Until you have seen a cat
>hunting, chasing, playing in the outdoors, or even fishing - yes, our
>cats fish - then you cannot ever expect to understand what a cat is
>when it can express all of its nature.
>
>Get a life, please.
>
>Peter Wieck
>Melrose Park, PA


I'm curious about the fishing thing. Do they sit at the bank and try
to grab fish when they come too close? There was a small fishing pond
in my yard (like a bathtub) when I bought the house but I had to
remove it since I figured it would just be a sushi bar for the feline
members of the household. Not to mention the birds.

Cats and water is always a funny situation. Some hate it and some are
fascinated by it. Marlo gets almost ecstatic when I use the turkey
baster to remove something that fell into their fountain. She swats at
it and climbs all over trying to get to it. The other two ignore it
completely. They're just all so weird.

April 7th 09, 04:40 PM
On Apr 6, 9:00*am, dgk > wrote:

> I'm curious about the fishing thing. Do they sit at the bank and try
> to grab fish when they come too close? There was a small fishing pond
> in my yard (like a bathtub) when I bought the house but I had to
> remove it since I figured it would just be a sushi bar for the feline
> members of the household. Not to mention the birds.

Our neighbor has a moderately large fishpond in their back yard with
something between 40 and 60 large comets in it - averaging about a
foot long. They give away something between 15 and 30 each year (yes,
they are breeding - almost like guppies) to the local pond supply in
trade for food and plants, but they are always managing a crowd. So,
when our cats started fishing in their pond they raised no objections
at all - even find it amusing.

The big Maine Coon sits on a rock a few feet from the edge and dangles
one paw in the water by a few inches - keep in mind his paws are about
the size of a small saucer and webbed (typical of the breed). When a
fish gets close enough, he attempts to gaff it and flip it onto the
shore. The younger cat used the same technique but with both paws in
the water - until he got a fish that outweighed him and was pulled in.
He managed to get the fish to the edge of the pond, but he has not
been back since - maybe he is waiting for warmer weather. Yes, they
share their catch.

Before we moved into this house we had a small pond in our back yard
with much smaller fish in it. The big cat learned there and is
teaching by example.

Neither cat has expressed much interest at all in birds other than as
amusing diversions. They like to watch the feeder but never make any
attempt to catch anything from it. They pretty much prey on fish and
'vermin' - mice/moles/voles/rabbits/squirrels/chipmunks and so forth.

On the whole indoor/outdoor thing - the nature of a cat is such that
if it is confined to the indoors with very, very, vanishingly few
exceptions, it will not be able to express its entire nature. At which
point it is no longer a cat but an appendage to our egos. That is fair
neither to us nor to the cat. Sure, there are some (over)breeds with
only a few firing neurons that adapt fairly well to confinement but
that is the exception, hardly the rule. So, this puts one on the
proverbial horns of a dilemma - there are very real risks to allowing
a cat access to the outside - that is undeniable. As with ourselves -
every time we leave our abode, drive a vehicle, cross a street, fly in
an airplane, whatever - there are very real and undeniable risks
attached. But, watching a cat be a cat with all the expression and
behavior attached to that behavior makes one have to think very, very
hard before denying that absolute joy to the animal. Naturally, city
cats are an entirely different problem. There is no legitimate
possibility for free outdoor access. And that makes the burden on the
owner doubly difficult. Ah, well.

And as to Ms. Cyber-whatever - I will deal with her when the weather
is sufficiently wretched that I have nothing better to do. But I will
start with her advice to an individual what an altered male cat who
suddenly started peeing all over - her advice was to confine it. NOT -
even given all her ranting on taking cats to vets and such - to have
it checked for a urinary or kidney or other medical problem, an
obvious concern for a sudden change in behavior. As I wrote before -
dangerous.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Phil P.
April 19th 09, 08:57 AM
> wrote in message
...
On Apr 2, 4:28 pm, John Gordon > wrote:

>> Yes, we have exactly three. What is special about that number?

> With three cats, there is always an alliance between any given two
> against the third.

Not only is that about the most asinine and bogus thing I've ever heard- its
also very dangerous and incredibly irresponsible. Didn't you think about the
impact bogus information like this can have on the lives of cats languishing
in shelters who won't get adopted because you scared people away from
adopting a third cat with your bogus bull****? Or don't you normally think
that far head?

I can single-handedly debunk your ludicrous drivel as an owner of three cats
for decades, and as someome who placed *many*, *many* third cats in homes
and *never* seen or heard of a situation like you concocted. A third cat is
just as likely to get along or not get along with resident cats as a second,
fourth, fifth or tenth cat.

This is the second time (that I know of) that you've posted bogus
information that could be harmful to cats. The first time was a bogus,
outdated myth about neutering affecting urethral dimensions in male cats.
Remember that nugget of crap? I shudder at the thought of how many people
you scared out of neutering their cats.

Do the cats of this world a favor and either think before you type or sit on
your hands when you get the urge to type something stupid and potentially
dangerous.