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CorrieZ
April 4th 09, 12:40 PM
A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.

He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
indoor cat?

Ralph
April 4th 09, 04:26 PM
Best advice: keep him indoors. I hope he's 'fixed'.

Indoors, he'll lead a happy, long life, with caring owners.
My 'humaine society' tabby is now over 17 human years old. - and still has a
purr I can hear standing over her.

Cats are smarter than you think. I believe you'll get to observe that
yourself.
If he *really* wanted out, he'd have dashed by your feet, out the door, when
he had a chance.
Most cats will look out a window, if they have the chance. They get to see
the normal routine outside - it's like TV for us.



"CorrieZ" > wrote in message
...
>A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> indoor cat?

James
April 4th 09, 04:34 PM
On Apr 4, 7:40*am, CorrieZ > wrote:
> A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> indoor cat?

I've lost a cat before so I think it may be better to wait till he
gets really comfortable and knows you well before letting him out. If
he learns when and where he's being fed at least he'll try to return
to the feeding bowl. I would go out with him on a leash first so he
learns the area. Give him a food bowl just outside you door so he
will return there. You might also get him microchiped and wear a
collar telling people he's got a chip. Introduce him to your
neighbors in case he strays.

cybercat
April 4th 09, 04:34 PM
"CorrieZ" > wrote in message
...
>A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> indoor cat?

You should not be considering allowing him outside unsupervised. He is young
and will adapt to being inside. He needs toys, a vertical scratcher tall
enough for him to get a good stretch while he is scratching, an Alpine
Scratcher (on a slant) and a window perch where he can lie in the sun and
watch the birds and squirrels. His past owners were irresponsible for
letting him out. Cars are not the only thing to fear--attacks from other
animals, disease, getting his collar caught and hanging to death, and
sadistic humans are only a few of the things he might face. He does not need
to be outside--just to see outside. Recent experiments with "cat cams"
demonstrate that cats do outdoors a lot the same things they do
indoors--mainly nap. Keep him safe, or take him back to the shelter.

James
April 4th 09, 05:01 PM
On Apr 4, 11:34*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "CorrieZ" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> >A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> > local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> > previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> > him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> > find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> > outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> > there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> > to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> > sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> > doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> > he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> > him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> > He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> > outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> > about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> > indoor cat?
>
> You should not be considering allowing him outside unsupervised. He is young
> and will adapt to being inside. He needs toys, a vertical scratcher tall
> enough for him to get a good stretch while he is scratching, an Alpine
> Scratcher (on a slant) and a window perch where he can lie in the sun and
> watch the birds and squirrels. His past owners were irresponsible for
> letting him out. Cars are not the only thing to fear--attacks from other
> animals, disease, getting his collar caught and hanging to death, and
> sadistic humans are only a few of the things he might face. He does not need
> to be outside--just to see outside. Recent experiments with "cat cams"
> demonstrate that cats do outdoors a lot the same things they do
> indoors--mainly nap. Keep him safe, or take him back to the shelter.- Hide quoted text -
>
Of course if you take him back to the shelter he might get adopted by
some nutty cheapskate who ends up having him put to sleep for $30.

CorrieZ
April 5th 09, 12:45 PM
On Apr 4, 12:01*pm, James > wrote:
> On Apr 4, 11:34*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> > "CorrieZ" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > >A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> > > local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> > > previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> > > him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> > > find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> > > outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> > > there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> > > to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> > > sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> > > doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> > > he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> > > him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> > > He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> > > outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> > > about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> > > indoor cat?
>
> > You should not be considering allowing him outside unsupervised. He is young
> > and will adapt to being inside. He needs toys, a vertical scratcher tall
> > enough for him to get a good stretch while he is scratching, an Alpine
> > Scratcher (on a slant) and a window perch where he can lie in the sun and
> > watch the birds and squirrels. His past owners were irresponsible for
> > letting him out. Cars are not the only thing to fear--attacks from other
> > animals, disease, getting his collar caught and hanging to death, and
> > sadistic humans are only a few of the things he might face. He does not need
> > to be outside--just to see outside. Recent experiments with "cat cams"
> > demonstrate that cats do outdoors a lot the same things they do
> > indoors--mainly nap. Keep him safe, or take him back to the shelter.- Hide quoted text -
>
> Of course if you take him back to the shelter he might get adopted by
> some nutty cheapskate who ends up having him put to sleep for $30.

Thanks for all your replies. Although I'm in a fairly rural area (on a
farm), and the shelter has neutered him and microchipped him, my gut
feeling is still to keep him inside. I was worried that I would be
doing him a disservice if I didn't let him do what he seems to want to
do. However, we don't let our kids do what they want just because they
want to. And for most of my adult life I've trained and shown dogs and
horses who didn't do whatever they wanted (this is my first cat since
I was a kid, and the cat was my mother's so I didn't really pay
attention). I don't believe in just throwing an animal outside; my
dogs were never allowed out without me, and my horses were always in
an enclosure. All of them would come when called, but it's been my
observation that cats only do that if they feel like it <s>. So
basically you've reaffirmed what I was leaning towards in the first
place......lol.

If anyone is interested in seeing the little guy who has completely
stolen my heart, he is at www.corriez.com/Bo. These are just candid
snaphots; can't wait to get him in the studio (have to get him to stop
playing with the backdrops first!).

James
April 5th 09, 02:57 PM
On Apr 5, 7:45*am, CorrieZ > wrote:

> Thanks for all your replies. Although I'm in a fairly rural area (on a
> farm), and the shelter has neutered him and microchipped him, my gut
> feeling is still to keep him inside. I was worried that I would be
> doing him a disservice if I didn't let him do what he seems to want to
> do. However, we don't let our kids do what they want just because they
> want to. And for most of my adult life I've trained and shown dogs and
> horses who didn't do whatever they wanted (this is my first cat since
> I was a kid, and the cat was my mother's so I didn't really pay
> attention). I don't believe in just throwing an animal outside; my
> dogs were never allowed out without me, and my horses were always in
> an enclosure. All of them would come when called, but it's been my
> observation that cats only do that if they feel like it <s>. So
> basically you've reaffirmed what I was leaning towards in the first
> place......lol.
>
> If anyone is interested in seeing the little guy who has completely
> stolen my heart, he is atwww.corriez.com/Bo. These are just candid
> snaphots; can't wait to get him in the studio (have to get him to stop
> playing with the backdrops first!).- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Very nice pictures. Don't know if the studio can do better.

Being on the farm I doubt he'll wander off the property. Well, if you
cat really wants out he'll show you. When she was young my cat would
jump down on me while I was still sleeping Now she would sit by the
door. Several times when I didn't let her out she did her BM in the
bath tub instead of her litter box. I got the message.

cybercat
April 5th 09, 04:01 PM
"CorrieZ" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 4, 12:01 pm, James > wrote:
> On Apr 4, 11:34 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> > "CorrieZ" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > >A little over a month ago, I adopted a 1 1/2 -year-old cat from our
> > > local shelter. He's a wonderful cat; so lucky I got him. In his
> > > previous home, he was allowed outdoors. I have been hesitant to let
> > > him out, because I'm afraid he'll get lost, or wander off trying to
> > > find his previous home. What is the best way to introduce him to the
> > > outdoors around MY house? We live at the end of a dead-end road, so
> > > there's no traffic, and the house borders on woods. I think he wants
> > > to go outside in the worst way. Quite often I find him down cellar
> > > sitting at the top of the stairs by the bulkhead. Oddly enough, he
> > > doesn't hang out by the front or back doors in the house, even though
> > > he sees people go in and out all the time. Maybe it's just easier for
> > > him to hear "critters" outside from the bulkhead.
>
> > > He has a lot of energy, and we play with him a lot, but I think being
> > > outdoors would make him happy too. Any suggestions as to how to go
> > > about re-introducing him to the outside? Or - how to make him a happy
> > > indoor cat?
>
> > You should not be considering allowing him outside unsupervised. He is
> > young
> > and will adapt to being inside. He needs toys, a vertical scratcher tall
> > enough for him to get a good stretch while he is scratching, an Alpine
> > Scratcher (on a slant) and a window perch where he can lie in the sun
> > and
> > watch the birds and squirrels. His past owners were irresponsible for
> > letting him out. Cars are not the only thing to fear--attacks from other
> > animals, disease, getting his collar caught and hanging to death, and
> > sadistic humans are only a few of the things he might face. He does not
> > need
> > to be outside--just to see outside. Recent experiments with "cat cams"
> > demonstrate that cats do outdoors a lot the same things they do
> > indoors--mainly nap. Keep him safe, or take him back to the shelter.-
> > Hide quoted text -
>
> Of course if you take him back to the shelter he might get adopted by
> some nutty cheapskate who ends up having him put to sleep for $30.

>Thanks for all your replies. Although I'm in a fairly rural area (on a
>farm), and the shelter has neutered him and microchipped him, my gut
>feeling is still to keep him inside.

I thought you seemed like a smart woman. There are worse things than death.
I imagine being disembowled by a pack of stray dogs or tortured to death by
a sick human are two of them.

>I was worried that I would be
>doing him a disservice if I didn't let him do what he seems to want to
>do. However, we don't let our kids do what they want just because they
>want to.

Excellent way of putting it~!

cybercat
April 5th 09, 04:03 PM
"CorrieZ" > wrote
>If anyone is interested in seeing the little guy who has completely
>stolen my heart, he is at www.corriez.com/Bo. These are just candid
>snaphots; can't wait to get him in the studio (have to get him to stop
>playing with the backdrops first!).

Oh, he is really beautiful!! His face looks like it was just sprinkled with
snow. You are quite a nice photographer, too! many happy years to you and
Bo.

cybercat
April 5th 09, 04:25 PM
On Apr 4, 12:01 pm, James > wrote:

> > indoors--mainly nap. Keep him safe, or take him back to the shelter.-
> > Hide quoted text -
>
> Of course if you take him back to the shelter he might get adopted by
> some nutty cheapskate who ends up having him put to sleep for $30.

I have you killfiled because of your "pussy" idiocy, so I will have to
piggyback this one.

I imagine you would have brought a cat with painful, terminal mouth and jaw
cancer home to suffer and rot until you got sick of looking at her. Yes, I
am indeed a "nutty cheapskate." This is only one of the reasons I have
morons like you killfiled. As I recall, you allow your animals to roam
unsupervised and feed them the cheapest **** on the market. You won't get a
job, so you were posting about whether or not your cat would be too cold
without heat last winter as I recall.

You, I would allow to suffer with necrotic tissue and metastasizing cancer
that is always fatal. You, I would bring home and watch you waste away while
trying to remain stoic and brave. You, I would never, ever spend a penny on.
Not a cent to ease your suffering. In fact, I might spend a neat fortune
just to do these things, just for your comment implying that we euthanized
our cat for any reason besides mercy.

Recalling that this cat had a heart condition that made the vet not want to
put her under for dental exams, that I specifically asked about this years
ago so that we would do the right thing and not endanger her unnecessarily.

Recalling that I had smelled an off smell from her mouth months ago and the
stupid bitch at the vet said it was her teeth, without taking a really good
look.

Recalling that we switched vets after it became clear there was more than
tooth decay going on.

Recalling that this cat came to us obese AND hyperthyroid, has gone to the
vet four times a year since we've had her, and just had a mammary tumor
removed last July--hardly what anyone too tight to get her treatment would
have done. Read this, pussyboy, and know that you, who will not work enough
to keep your utilities on, could never have done ANY of the above for ANY
animal. Or even yourself.

http://vetmed.illinois.edu/petcolumns/showarticle.cfm?id=19


I'd say **** off and die, but I think "**** off and suffer" is preferable.

HAND.

CorrieZ
April 6th 09, 11:43 AM
Thanks for the nice comments.


On Apr 5, 11:03*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "CorrieZ" > wrote
>
> >If anyone is interested in seeing the little guy who has completely
> >stolen my heart, he is atwww.corriez.com/Bo. These are just candid
> >snaphots; can't wait to get him in the studio (have to get him to stop
> >playing with the backdrops first!).
>
> Oh, he is really beautiful!! His face looks like it was just sprinkled with
> snow. You are quite a nice photographer, too! many happy years to you and
> Bo.

cybercat
April 6th 09, 04:47 PM
"CorrieZ" > wrote in message
...
>Thanks for the nice comments.

The girl we lost was also a tuxedo cat. They are lovely. She had the most
velvety fur.

CorrieZ
April 7th 09, 11:36 AM
On Apr 6, 11:47*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "CorrieZ" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >Thanks for the nice comments.
>
> The girl we lost was also a tuxedo cat. They are lovely. She had the most
> velvety fur.

I'm very sorry you lost your cat.

cybercat
April 7th 09, 03:32 PM
"CorrieZ" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 6, 11:47 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "CorrieZ" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> >Thanks for the nice comments.
>
> The girl we lost was also a tuxedo cat. They are lovely. She had the most
> velvety fur.

>I'm very sorry you lost your cat.

Thank you. It seems to be getting worse instead of better. We second guess
ourselves all the time in this situation. She was suffering, pawing at the
side of her face and unable to take more than a few bits of food without
struggling, it looked like for air, but I don't know. She would put her head
back and kind of way it around, like she was trying to get something out of
her mouth that was stuck. She was down to babyfood only, and only when I sat
by her and stroked her and encouraged her.