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Geni
April 4th 09, 08:00 PM
Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
local. Hope this is of some use.

cybercat
April 4th 09, 08:28 PM
"Geni" > wrote in message
...
> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
> local. Hope this is of some use.

Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?

cshenk
April 4th 09, 09:04 PM
"Geni" wrote

> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
> local. Hope this is of some use.

It is useful for some environs. If living truely rural (well away from any
roads etc) it may be a bit more than needed, but in a city, it may be all
that is ever safe.

I grew up i small town farm area where the norm was with a few chickens, a
few cats in the barn, and a few cows. A dog or so at the level of the cows
and the cats took to the loft with the hay and grain.

Some here do not have that same background or situation and may never have.
For me now, all cats are indoor but I live in the city with too many big
streets too close. If I lived well in the country, I'd let'em sun outside.

Cazz A
April 5th 09, 08:40 AM
cybercat wrote:
> "Geni" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>
> Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>
>
It seriously should depend on the cat. Some cats are very unhappy about
being kept indoors, no matter how long you try adjusting them to it. I
have 3 ex feral cats who were caught as adults, they're fine with my
home because they have the choice.

All 11(soon to be 9)of mine get a choice, outdoors in my enclosure or
indoors. My enclosure is attached to the house so they truly get a
choice. Outside has many dangers - cars, evil people, dogs...Unless
you're willing to be responsible for all these dangers, keep the cat
enclosed.

cybercat
April 5th 09, 08:48 AM
"Cazz A" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>> "Geni" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>
>> Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
> It seriously should depend on the cat.

I said "unsupervised." That does not depend on the cat unless you don't care
what happens to the cat.

Claude V. Lucas
April 5th 09, 08:57 AM
In article >,
Cazz A > wrote:
>cybercat wrote:
>> "Geni" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>
>> Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>
>>
>It seriously should depend on the cat. Some cats are very unhappy about
>being kept indoors, no matter how long you try adjusting them to it. I
>have 3 ex feral cats who were caught as adults, they're fine with my
>home because they have the choice.
>
>All 11(soon to be 9)of mine get a choice, outdoors in my enclosure or
>indoors. My enclosure is attached to the house so they truly get a
>choice. Outside has many dangers - cars, evil people, dogs...Unless
>you're willing to be responsible for all these dangers, keep the cat
>enclosed.

A large very friendly feral tuxedo ex-tom has moved into my car.
He's been around the neighborhood for years since he was a teenager.
I feed him, the neighbors who let their cats roam feed him too.
There's actually three large tuxedo roamers in the neighborhood
along with a few miscellaneous others. Narrow streets, speed bumps,
familiar people... Not the worst place for cats to be out.
Anyway, I brought the squatter inside during a snowstorm last winter
and as soon as he dried off and warmed up and ate something he went
and sat quietly by the door till I let him back out into the storm.

He hopped into his new home, the car in the carport...

As long as he keeps to the lease agreement of don't let me
drive off with him in the car and don't spray the seatcovers
I'll keep the back window unzipped...

*Some* places definitely aren't safe for cats to be out.

Petzl
April 5th 09, 10:58 PM
On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>
>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>
I think cats decide this on their own. Mine ripped a hole in window
insect netting and has used this to come and go as she pleases for
around 20 years now (My house is surrounded by parkland)

--
Petzl
Battle Hymn of the Republic
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=JCqZ-9-lDEo
http://tinyurl.com/8vqqxd

dgk
April 6th 09, 01:48 PM
On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>
>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>

Constant supervision?

I think I have the ideal setup. A small backyard (around 18 * 50 feet)
that I have fenced in so they can't get out. Well, yes they could if
they really tried. They could climb one of the evergreens that is
higher than the fence and climb over. But they haven't yet.

Seriously, one of the reasons I bought the house was because I wanted
my cats to be able to go outside reasonably safely. Nothing in life is
guaranteed and it is possible that a hawk could swoop down and carry
one off (we do have some hawks around), and once in a great while one
of the cats kills a bird.

And there are some enemy cats in the neighborhood that sometimes come
close to the fence and there is some hissing. But the cats get to eat
grass and roll in the dirt and rest in the sun, or, in the shade
depending on the situation. Plus chasing butterflies - a big treat.

During the winter I keep a fairly close eye on them because I have to
keep the door closed. But yesterday was the first day where I could
leave the door open and they're free to go in and out. And that's what
they do. They spend most of the time outside but come in periodicially
to check to see if any food might have shown up. And I keep an eye out
of course.

I can't guarantee that nothing bad will happen to them, but I've done
the best I can reasonably do, and they love being able to go out. Espy
will sit at the back door complaining bitterly if I can't let him out
for some reason.

Plus, of course, I have the RF transmitters on their colllars so I can
track them within a few hundred feet.

cybercat
April 6th 09, 03:21 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>
>>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>
>
> Constant supervision?
>

I wasn't talking about fenced yards, but now that you mention it ...

cybercat
April 6th 09, 05:18 PM
"Petzl" > wrote in message
...
> On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>
>>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>
> I think cats decide this on their own. Mine ripped a hole in window
> insect netting and has used this to come and go as she pleases for
> around 20 years now (My house is surrounded by parkland)
>
You are the one with the forebrain and opposable thumbs, right?

LauraM[_2_]
April 6th 09, 07:48 PM
On Apr 4, 1:04*pm, "cshenk" > wrote:
> "Geni" wrote
>
> > Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
> > introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
> > usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
> > of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
> > outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
> > them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
> > local. Hope this is of some use.
>
> It is useful for some environs. *If living truely rural (well away from any
> roads etc) it may be a bit more than needed, but in a city, it may be all
> that is ever safe.
>
> I grew up i small town farm area where the norm was with a few chickens, a
> few cats in the barn, and a few cows. *A dog or so at the level of the cows
> and the cats took to the loft with the hay and grain.
>
> Some here do not have that same background or situation and may never have.
> For me now, all cats are indoor but I live in the city with too many big
> streets too close. *If I lived well in the country, I'd let'em sun outside.

My cat is indoors only, but just to let others know, we have a second
home in a very rural area which means coyotes, hawks, bobcats, and god
only knows what else. My husband found a rabbit foot in our back
yard. Just the foot. The rest of the body was eaten by a coyote most
likely.

We have a raised deck about 30 feet off the ground because it's on the
side of a hill. There's no way my cat could get off the deck. I used
to take him, supervised, out onto the deck and he enjoyed sitting on
the lounge chair watching the hummingbirds and other birds frolicing
about. Now even *he* won't go out there. I wonder what he saw?
(rhetorical question) He knows a good thing when he sees it......he's
now back inside where he belongs.

cybercat
April 6th 09, 10:58 PM
"LauraM" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 4, 1:04 pm, "cshenk" > wrote:

>> Some here do not have that same background or situation and may never
>> have.
>> For me now, all cats are indoor but I live in the city with too many big
>> streets too close. If I lived well in the country, I'd let'em sun
>> outside.

>My cat is indoors only, but just to let others know, we have a second
>home in a very rural area which means coyotes, hawks, bobcats, and god
>only knows what else. My husband found a rabbit foot in our back
>yard. Just the foot. The rest of the body was eaten by a coyote most
>likely.

>We have a raised deck about 30 feet off the ground because it's on the
>side of a hill. There's no way my cat could get off the deck. I used
>to take him, supervised, out onto the deck and he enjoyed sitting on
>the lounge chair watching the hummingbirds and other birds frolicing
>about. Now even *he* won't go out there. I wonder what he saw?
>(rhetorical question) He knows a good thing when he sees it......he's
>now back inside where he belongs.

It's amazing how some cats are smarter than humans that way. :)

dgk
April 7th 09, 01:51 PM
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 10:21:56 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>>
>>>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>>
>>
>> Constant supervision?
>>
>
>I wasn't talking about fenced yards, but now that you mention it ...
>

Yes, if the yard wasn't fenced I don't think I could let them out. Too
much stuff outside of my control.

cybercat
April 7th 09, 06:41 PM
"dgk" > wrote
>
> Yes, if the yard wasn't fenced I don't think I could let them out. Too
> much stuff outside of my control.

My sister lets hers out ino her fenced yard. One day something got in and
attacked one of hers, she still has no idea what.

Petzl
April 8th 09, 05:49 AM
On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 12:18:28 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"Petzl" > wrote in message
...
>> On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>>
>>>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>>
>>>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>>
>> I think cats decide this on their own. Mine ripped a hole in window
>> insect netting and has used this to come and go as she pleases for
>> around 20 years now (My house is surrounded by parkland)
>>
>You are the one with the forebrain and opposable thumbs, right?
>
And when I fill my mouth with milk, lie on my back with mouth open cat
will lick it out ;->

The only wild animals in my neighborhood are swans geese ducks and
the odd escaped dog around me.

But if a cat wants to get out it does IMO.
I also see a outside cat has a longer lifespan than a inside only cat.
--
Petzl
Battle Hymn of the Republic
http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=JCqZ-9-lDEo
http://tinyurl.com/8vqqxd

cyberpurrs
April 8th 09, 06:03 AM
"Petzl" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 6 Apr 2009 12:18:28 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Petzl" > wrote in message
...
>>> On Sat, 4 Apr 2009 15:28:46 -0400, "cybercat" >
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Geni" > wrote in message
...
>>>>> Hi all, I have just joined the group, I saw your post below about
>>>>> introducing your furry friend to the outdoors at his new home. It's
>>>>> usually best to supervise and introduce him slowly, for short periods
>>>>> of time, gradually staying out longer and longer. There are also
>>>>> outdoor cage systems which attach to the side of the house, allowing
>>>>> them to be ouside, exercise while remaining totally safe, and always
>>>>> local. Hope this is of some use.
>>>>
>>>>Are you advocating eventually allowing a cat outside unsupervised?
>>>>
>>> I think cats decide this on their own. Mine ripped a hole in window
>>> insect netting and has used this to come and go as she pleases for
>>> around 20 years now (My house is surrounded by parkland)
>>>
>>You are the one with the forebrain and opposable thumbs, right?
>>
> And when I fill my mouth with milk, lie on my back with mouth open cat
> will lick it out ;->
>
> The only wild animals in my neighborhood are swans geese ducks and
> the odd escaped dog around me.
>
> But if a cat wants to get out it does IMO.
> I also see a outside cat has a longer lifespan than a inside only cat.

You see wrong. You see stupid. Good luck with that.

dgk
April 8th 09, 04:08 PM
On Tue, 7 Apr 2009 13:41:56 -0400, "cybercat" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote
>>
>> Yes, if the yard wasn't fenced I don't think I could let them out. Too
>> much stuff outside of my control.
>
>My sister lets hers out ino her fenced yard. One day something got in and
>attacked one of hers, she still has no idea what.
>

It's possible. But their joy overrides the risk. I always look around
before letting them out but I can miss something. They don't miss
anything though. I always watch for the first few minutes.

The only things around are possums, raccoons, and other cats. There is
no problem with possums since cats and possums get along ok. Raccoons
don't stick around in the daytime and we very rarely have them anyway.

Actually, the bigger danger is that another cat gets trapped in the
yard. They can't get in easily but it has happened.

I usually open part of the fence overnight so anything that does get
in can get out. Possums and Raccoons don't need a hole; they can climb
out with no trouble. But cats don't climb as well.

There's a risk in everything we do. Sure I can keep them inside all
the time, but they love going out. It's part of their joy in life. I
do what I can to minimize the risks.

cybercat
April 8th 09, 11:01 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 7 Apr 2009 13:41:56 -0400, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"dgk" > wrote
>>>
>>> Yes, if the yard wasn't fenced I don't think I could let them out. Too
>>> much stuff outside of my control.
>>
>>My sister lets hers out ino her fenced yard. One day something got in and
>>attacked one of hers, she still has no idea what.
>>
>
> It's possible. But their joy overrides the risk. I always look around
> before letting them out but I can miss something. They don't miss
> anything though. I always watch for the first few minutes.
>
> The only things around are possums, raccoons, and other cats. There is
> no problem with possums since cats and possums get along ok. Raccoons
> don't stick around in the daytime and we very rarely have them anyway.
>
> Actually, the bigger danger is that another cat gets trapped in the
> yard. They can't get in easily but it has happened.
>
> I usually open part of the fence overnight so anything that does get
> in can get out. Possums and Raccoons don't need a hole; they can climb
> out with no trouble. But cats don't climb as well.
>
> There's a risk in everything we do. Sure I can keep them inside all
> the time, but they love going out. It's part of their joy in life. I
> do what I can to minimize the risks.

Whatever.