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jamina1
April 14th 09, 06:15 AM
Thank you all for your recent help with my cat Sylvanas. But now my
problem lies with my current cat, Pagan. She's very spunky - and for
her health I have started feeding her holistic wet food - I've settled
on Merrick brand and she's happy with the flavors available.

My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.

Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
home!

Even if there is food in her bowl, but it is not a flavor she enjoys a
lot or if it has been sitting for a little while, she will come in and
start gnawing. I know that my behavior has only "trained" her to
continue - every time she does it I get angry, fed up, and end up
feeding her, so technically I'm rewarding her.

As I've pretty much always had her on wet food which requires smaller
portions more often, I'm wondering - should I sacrifice her ultimate
long term health with this natural food and get dry food that I can
put down in quantity? (Which then ultimately means she will overeat
and become fat and unhealthy)

I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!

Linda Boucher
April 14th 09, 11:51 AM
Hi
try putting rubber tubing around the wire or wrap foil
paper around them cats don't like foil wrap.. my cat is afraid of it
Linda

>

Spider[_3_]
April 14th 09, 12:45 PM
"jamina1" > wrote in message
...
> Thank you all for your recent help with my cat Sylvanas. But now my
> problem lies with my current cat, Pagan. She's very spunky - and for
> her health I have started feeding her holistic wet food - I've settled
> on Merrick brand and she's happy with the flavors available.
>
> My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
> sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
> into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
> prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
> have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
> DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.
>
> Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
> actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
> want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
> home!
>
> Even if there is food in her bowl, but it is not a flavor she enjoys a
> lot or if it has been sitting for a little while, she will come in and
> start gnawing. I know that my behavior has only "trained" her to
> continue - every time she does it I get angry, fed up, and end up
> feeding her, so technically I'm rewarding her.
>
> As I've pretty much always had her on wet food which requires smaller
> portions more often, I'm wondering - should I sacrifice her ultimate
> long term health with this natural food and get dry food that I can
> put down in quantity? (Which then ultimately means she will overeat
> and become fat and unhealthy)
>
> I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
> unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
> eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
> tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!
>

Spider[_3_]
April 14th 09, 01:27 PM
"jamina1" > wrote in message
...
> Thank you all for your recent help with my cat Sylvanas. But now my
> problem lies with my current cat, Pagan. She's very spunky - and for
> her health I have started feeding her holistic wet food - I've settled
> on Merrick brand and she's happy with the flavors available.
>
> My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
> sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
> into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
> prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
> have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
> DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.
>
> Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
> actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
> want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
> home!
>
> Even if there is food in her bowl, but it is not a flavor she enjoys a
> lot or if it has been sitting for a little while, she will come in and
> start gnawing. I know that my behavior has only "trained" her to
> continue - every time she does it I get angry, fed up, and end up
> feeding her, so technically I'm rewarding her.
>
> As I've pretty much always had her on wet food which requires smaller
> portions more often, I'm wondering - should I sacrifice her ultimate
> long term health with this natural food and get dry food that I can
> put down in quantity? (Which then ultimately means she will overeat
> and become fat and unhealthy)
>
> I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
> unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
> eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
> tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!
>
Sorry about that .. finger trouble!

Hi Jamina,

I think we all have this trouble, especially with younger and 'spunky' cats.
My Panther was a (loveable) menace as a kitten and she's still full of spunk
... attitude, mischief, however you want to name it!

I put all my kittens through cable, chemical and car training, in the hope
that they'll live longer. With cables, I simply start by having cute,
bouncy kitten in the room while I'm ironing. At first, I don't get much
ironing done :~). After a while, if repeated "no's" and "leave it - it will
hurt you's" don't work, and a *light* slap doesn't help, then I teach kitty
about what is on the other end of the cable. I would never, NEVER hurt my
cats so you must believe this is done with extreme care: I pick kitty up,
make sure no lashing paw can escape, then I carefully bring the hot iron
closer to kitty's nose - this being the most sensitive part, so you really
don't have to get too close. Most kittens learn almost instantly; Panther
took a while longer :~), but both my cats leave cables alone. If my husband
is handling cables so that they 'dance' or 'wriggle' (which is very tempting
to a cat), then I only have to say firmly "leave it - it will hurt you", and
kitty gets the message. If I feel there's still some danger, both cats are
shut out of the room until the work is done. This is not always possible
with open plan homes, so cats need to learn that cables aren't toys very
early on.

I feel sure you will think the above is rather extreme, but it is done with
great kindness (my cats love and trust me) and for the best reasons, and it
*works*.

Don't let her fool you - her cable biting is not about hunger: it's about
getting your attention. As you perceive, it seems to work :~).
I'm sure there is nothing wrong with the wet diet you already give her. If
she eats it, she's happy with it so if it ain't broke, don't mend it.
However, you could supplement it. Cats are natural 'browsers'; that is,
they like to snack lightly, little and often. Continue with the wet food,
but make sure she always has a bowl of (yummy flavour) biscuits which she
can chomp on at will. There are plenty of 'light' (low fat) biscuit recipes
out there which are also good for urinary health and even teeth.

It would help, of course, if you could close the bedroom door and exclude
her, but that may not be possible. Make the most of your unemployment and
use this time to train her. Good luck.

Spider

AZ Nomad[_2_]
April 14th 09, 03:21 PM
On Mon, 13 Apr 2009 22:15:49 -0700 (PDT), jamina1 > wrote:
....
>My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
>sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
>into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
>prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
>have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
>DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.

>Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
>actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
>want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
>home!
....

Get some super-hot hotsauce and coat the wires with it.
Stuff like "dave's insanity sauce" will break kitty of the habbit before
she discovers what high voltage is like.

If you coat the wires using your hands, wash them at least four times in a row
to remove all traces. You don't want traces getting in your eyes or worse.

James
April 14th 09, 04:53 PM
On Apr 14, 8:27*am, "Spider" > wrote:

>
> I put all my kittens through cable, chemical and car training, in the hope
> that they'll live longer. *

Please describe car training. My cat is but I don't know how I did it
other than being out there with her and watching out for cars. There
are few cars except during rush hours. When she was young she would
leisurely cross the street even when a car was coming down the road.
I would of course call her and made sure the driver saw her. When she
was young she would try to follow me into my car. I had to make sure
I can see her far away before starting the car.

April 14th 09, 05:41 PM
First, one question--how often are you feeding her the wet? It's best
to serve twice per day, approximately 12 hours apart. Cats don't need
more frequent feedings than that. IMO I would stick to the wet food.

Second, is it possible to shut her out of the room where the computer
wires are? If this is not possible, you can buy clear plastic tubing,
cut a hole in it lengthwise, then stuff all of the wires insides that.
The wires are safely encased and kitty is much safer. You can use hot
sauce but IMO it's more mess than it's worth.

If she starts going for the wires, do NOT get up and feed her. Yes,
you are rewarding this (or any bad) behavior. Shut her out of the room
if you have to, but do not feed her if she does this. Since she's
already in the habit of bothering you for food, it will take some time
to break the habit, but it can be done. I suggest that, when you get
up, to NOT feed her right away. Read the paper, have some coffee, etc.
then feed her. She will learn that just because you get up, doesn't
mean that she gets fed.

I did this a number of years ago for our cats and it's nice not to be
bothered in the mornings. Even our kitten, now 7.5 months old, has
already learned this rule, since that's all she's known in her life so
far.

jamina1
April 14th 09, 07:40 PM
On Apr 14, 8:27*am, "Spider" > wrote:

> It would help, of course, if you could close the bedroom door and exclude
> her, but that may not be possible. *Make the most of your unemployment and
> use this time to train her. *Good luck.
>
> Spider

Thanks for the helpful tips.

I have done this before (my computer is in my bedroom) and I did it
the other day, but only afterward did I realize that she had already
gnawed through the headphone cables. Thankfully I managed to fix both
pairs, but still it is very annoying to deal with.

I'll try what you suggest, and I think I may have to break down and
try the bitter apple stuff or some seriously hot hot sauce.

jamina1
April 14th 09, 07:42 PM
On Apr 14, 12:41*pm, wrote:
> First, one question--how often are you feeding her the wet? *It's best
> to serve twice per day, approximately 12 hours apart. Cats don't need
> more frequent feedings than that. *IMO I would stick to the wet food.
>
> Second, is it possible to shut her out of the room where the computer
> wires are? If this is not possible, you can buy clear plastic tubing,
> cut a hole in it lengthwise, then stuff all of the wires insides that.
> The wires are safely encased and kitty is much safer. You can use hot
> sauce but IMO it's more mess than it's worth.
>
> If she starts going for the wires, do NOT get up and feed her. Yes,
> you are rewarding this (or any bad) behavior. Shut her out of the room
> if you have to, but do not feed her if she does this. Since she's
> already in the habit of bothering you for food, it will take some time
> to break the habit, but it can be done. I suggest that, when you get
> up, to NOT feed her right away. Read the paper, have some coffee, etc.
> then feed her. She will learn that just because you get up, doesn't
> mean that she gets fed.
>
> I did this a number of years ago for our cats and it's nice not to be
> bothered in the mornings. Even our kitten, now 7.5 months old, has
> already learned this rule, since that's all she's known in her life so
> far.

Well, when I had a regular job routine, I would feed her when I got up
in the morning (7:30) and when I got home from work (6-6:30) so about
12 hours apart.
I know she is only doing it because she feels like the food is "done"
or she wants fresh, not because she is actually starving or needing
food (there's a supplemental bowl of dry food she can eat but she
rarely does).
She's just doing it because she figured out that it gets me moving,
which is what she wants - attention.

T[_4_]
April 14th 09, 08:24 PM
In article >,
says...
>
> Hi
> try putting rubber tubing around the wire or wrap foil
> paper around them cats don't like foil wrap.. my cat is afraid of it
> Linda
>
> >

Or do what I did. My first cat had a cable/wire chewing thing. So I went
to Home Depot and bought several lengths of split blue conduit. You
could tuck the cables inside and then close the split. He could chew on
those all he wanted, he wasn't getting through.

April 14th 09, 09:41 PM
On Apr 14, 1:15*am, jamina1 > wrote:

> I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
> unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
> eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
> tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!

Better living through chemistry.

There are several aerosol sprays for the purpose that keep cats (and
dogs) away from entire areas if necessary. This stuff has a bit of an
odor on first application but that goes away quickly. And, after a few
days, the cats simply get used to not going to that location anyway.

As to hot sauces, curry, mustard, even straight capsicum, we have
found over the years that (at least) our cats seem to prefer strong
flavors and are entirely unimpressed with even triple-heat flavors if
delivered by-mouth. And we would never put out something such that the
cat could be damaged by getting it in its eyes via washing or other
means.

But you *may* have two problems - the identifiable one with the cat
chewing wires, and the more subtle one as to why the cat is chewing
wires. This is not any sort of natural behavior other than the dangle-
factor with kittens and so is either displacement or boredom or (just
barely remotely possible) some sort of defficiency or irritation that
has the cat looking for something - may such as salt or some mineral,
or its gums itch and chewing 'rubbery stuff' calms the itch - teething
kittens come to mind immediately for this drive.

No-Spray will address the first issue. Perhaps a few toys
strategically place throughout the house will help with the second.
Kitty greens (or just sprouted popcorn for-cheap) will help with
roughage, tooth-cleaning and trace minerals. The oils from fresh
catnip will sooth itchy gums.

For toys, something as simple as a bulky neoprene O-ring (a few cents
at a plumbing supply) on the end of a ribbon hanging from a doorknob
does well. The rubber is inert and very tough, but chews and claws
nicely.

And if nothing helps, if a kitten (or a cat) chews through the output
cord from a 12VDC wall-wart, they won't get enough current to harm
them but they will get a massive jingle. I do not recommend or suggest
this. But it could be a lot worse than if they nail a 120V line in
your absence - negative reinforcement is always the very last resort.

Foil is effective, but a massive PITA to run throughout the house on
every cord, wire or pull-string.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Sharon
April 14th 09, 10:34 PM
I had a cat who chewed wires and tobassco sauce, etc. did not help.
He chewed through phone wires constantly. One day, while ironing, the
phone rang and while I answered it, the cat chewed halfway through the
iron cord and burnt his mouth with the sparks - he was afraid of irons
after that, but still would chew a cord if it was available. We had
to make sure the cords were behind furniture and he couldn't get to
them. He lived to be 20 and did it his whole life............

Sounds like wrapping the wires with foil, etc. is the best advice.

Bill Graham
April 15th 09, 02:39 AM
"Sharon" > wrote in message
...
>I had a cat who chewed wires and tobassco sauce, etc. did not help.
> He chewed through phone wires constantly. One day, while ironing, the
> phone rang and while I answered it, the cat chewed halfway through the
> iron cord and burnt his mouth with the sparks - he was afraid of irons
> after that, but still would chew a cord if it was available. We had
> to make sure the cords were behind furniture and he couldn't get to
> them. He lived to be 20 and did it his whole life............
>
> Sounds like wrapping the wires with foil, etc. is the best advice.
>
Yes. Some electric appliance cords have a grounded foil wrap underneath the
outer rubber insulation.....This would be ideal. The cat would have to get
through it before coming into contact with the electricity.....Foil leaves a
bad taste in the mouth, because of a slight battery action caused by the
saliva and metal........I don't like chewing on it either...:^)

Spider[_3_]
April 15th 09, 02:44 PM
"James" > wrote in message
...
On Apr 14, 8:27 am, "Spider" > wrote:

>
> I put all my kittens through cable, chemical and car training, in the hope
> that they'll live longer.

Please describe car training. My cat is but I don't know how I did it
other than being out there with her and watching out for cars. There
are few cars except during rush hours. When she was young she would
leisurely cross the street even when a car was coming down the road.
I would of course call her and made sure the driver saw her. When she
was young she would try to follow me into my car. I had to make sure
I can see her far away before starting the car.


Hi James

Thanks for your interest. As I'm sure you've discovered, any form of
outdoor training is more difficult than indoors because the little dears can
scarper at will, so you need to be sure of their indoor training first. It
gives you a much stronger hand outside. Because my kittens couldn't go out
until all their innoculations were done, and then had to wait for their
spaying wounds to heal, I had heaps of time to concentrate on their indoor
training. This is important, because it means they were fairly biddable
when I took them outside.

I always use a harness and lead on each kitten for the first week or so,
just to have overall control and see how they react. Most kits react badly
to noise at first, so I use this reaction (and others) to reassure them when
they're safe and when there's a danger, and to encourage them to trust me.
Also, by the time they're outdoors, they've already learned words like
'hurt' and 'dangerous' and, obviously 'stay' and 'leave'. They know I'm in
charge. I don't take them too close to the road at first but, as they peer
at it curiously, I warn them it's dangerous; cars pass, and I say 'stay, it
would hurt you'. This is one time when noisy cars are helpful, because
they frighten the kits and reinforce what I'm teaching them.

Once they're off the lead, but still learning, I wait for them to veer
towards the drive and road and say 'stay, don't go in the road'. Naturally,
sometimes they wander out, but I call them and warn them until they come in.
When they do, they are thoroughly praised for returning. These days, if I
see them near the gate, I say 'Cheetah (or Panther) - don't go in the road'.
I may have to say it a couple of times, but they respond more often than
not. Right through training and beyond, I find it helpful to watch their
behaviour and encourage them when they even start to move in the right
direction. Once they've willfully gone their own way, it's difficult to
turn them around, so I find it helpful to encourage their slightest
inclination to obey. In truth, safety training of any sort is never really
over, because we're dealing with nosey little critters, so I just keep on
warning them and calling them to me.

No doubt, in your own way, you've done something similar. I knew someone
once who always took their kitten to the road's edge and, quite simply,
taught it the (human) Highway Code: look right .. left .. etc. ! :~)

Cats are amazingly clever creatures.
Spider

Bill Graham
April 15th 09, 07:44 PM
"Spider" > wrote in message
...
> Also, by the time they're outdoors, they've already learned words like
> 'hurt' and 'dangerous' and, obviously 'stay' and 'leave'.

And how, exactly, did you accomplish this? If I could do any of this, then
training my cats to avoid cars would be duck soup.........

cardarch
April 15th 09, 10:28 PM
I suppose you could keep a spray bottle of water in the bedroom and
spray him in the face whenever he menaces your wires. Or...you could
just get up out of bed and start the day like he wants you to do.
When all Snappy's ploys fail to get me out of bed, he reaches under
the covers and tries to pull my feet out onto the floor with his
enormous claws which I always think is kind of funny. He knows the
feet have to be on the floor so he can get what he wants. The other
really bad but funny thing he does is when he wants to play and he
catches me knitting is he jumps up on my lap and bites the yarn in
half and then immediately jumps down. Hes done this twice. Today I
spotted him trying to pull the knitting off the table. He's very
bored because its been raining and cold for days on end.

Spider[_3_]
April 16th 09, 12:51 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Spider" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Also, by the time they're outdoors, they've already learned words like
>> 'hurt' and 'dangerous' and, obviously 'stay' and 'leave'.
>
> And how, exactly, did you accomplish this? If I could do any of this, then
> training my cats to avoid cars would be duck soup.........


Hi Bill,

Cats are very clever. They may have some difficulty learning English (or
American), but they are experts at reading body language; that's how they
communicate and read each others' behaviour. Hopefully, it is not difficult
for you to see that, after word and behavioural repetition, cats can learn
to understand what we mean.

For instance, if I'm scratched by my kitten when playing (or play-fighting),
I say "Ouch, that hurt, Cheetah". I emphasize the 'hurt', lick my hand
(cats lick their paws when injured, so it's behaviour they understand), and
look more pained than I really am. I will then say "Gentle. Don't hurt
your person". Yes, all my cats have understood the word 'gentle', too. It
is very helpful when kitty is in mid needle-claw kneading prior to snoozing
on my lap! :~) I often say "Gentle paws, Panther" when that furry minx is
making a blood bath of my lower limbs. She understands and obeys.
Occasionally, she gets so carried away that she hurts me again, but a
repetition quickly calms her.

They gradually learn quite complex language. My first beloved cat,
Tiggypuss, used to beg for scraps while I was cooking. Sometimes, I
couldn't offer him something, so I would say "No, you wouldn't like it,
Tiggy". Because, previously, if he was purring over a favourite dinner, I
would say "Dear puss, you like that, don't you?", he'd clearly learned what
'like' meant and seemed to understand the negative. This became clearer to
me when, once, he backed off as I offered him a tasty treat he'd never had
before. I simply said "Try it .. you'll like it". He looked at me with
such a warm look of recognition and purred heartily, even before he started
tucking into it.

It is very clear to me that they learn some of our words. Tiggypuss learned
the word 'naughty' quite early in life due to his mischievious nature. One
day, when he was sadly mewing because he'd lost a toy under a cupboard, I
pulled the cupboard out to help him and said "It's not here, Tiggy". He
immediately flinched and became wide-eyed and anxious. He thought I'd said
'naughty' (rather than 'not here')! This was *my* big learning curve; after
that, I selected training words much more carefully.

I hope you now see how cats learn words for training and for repeated
behaviour situations. Most cat owners I talk to say their cats understand
at least some of their words/instructions. Cats are immensely clever;
patience, empathy and willingness simply make it easier for both sides. Try
it, and remember to share that duck soup with your cats :~).

Spider

S.Smith
April 18th 09, 05:54 AM
"jamina1" > wrote in message
...
> Thank you all for your recent help with my cat Sylvanas. But now my
> problem lies with my current cat, Pagan. She's very spunky - and for
> her health I have started feeding her holistic wet food - I've settled
> on Merrick brand and she's happy with the flavors available.
>
> My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
> sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
> into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
> prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
> have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
> DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.
>
> Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
> actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
> want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
> home!
>
> Even if there is food in her bowl, but it is not a flavor she enjoys a
> lot or if it has been sitting for a little while, she will come in and
> start gnawing. I know that my behavior has only "trained" her to
> continue - every time she does it I get angry, fed up, and end up
> feeding her, so technically I'm rewarding her.
>
> As I've pretty much always had her on wet food which requires smaller
> portions more often, I'm wondering - should I sacrifice her ultimate
> long term health with this natural food and get dry food that I can
> put down in quantity? (Which then ultimately means she will overeat
> and become fat and unhealthy)
>
> I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
> unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
> eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
> tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!

I see you have several possible solutions. I have one more.Years ago, I had
a cat that chewed electrical wires. There was a product at that time, and I
hope they still make it...the name is THUMB. It is a pepper extract to stop
thumb sucking and nail biting of kids. I smeared all the wires with a piece
of cotton and it worked. I had to do it a couple more times, but in the end
the habit stoped. I had him for about 17 more years with no incidents. I
used to buy it in a drugstore. I hope it works for you.
Petey's Mom
>

cybercat
April 18th 09, 07:50 PM
"S.Smith" > wrote
> I see you have several possible solutions. I have one more.Years ago, I
> had a cat that chewed electrical wires. There was a product at that time,
> and I hope they still make it...the name is THUMB. It is a pepper extract
> to stop thumb sucking and nail biting of kids.

My mom used that on me when I was small. I sucked it all off and asked for
more. :)

news[_5_]
April 19th 09, 04:58 AM
well, rest assured that if your cat chews through the wrong wires...it'll only happen once :)
"jamina1" > wrote in message ...
Thank you all for your recent help with my cat Sylvanas. But now my
problem lies with my current cat, Pagan. She's very spunky - and for
her health I have started feeding her holistic wet food - I've settled
on Merrick brand and she's happy with the flavors available.

My problem is that if I am not on the dot with her feedings (if I
sleep in on weekends, or if I am otherwise not awake) she will come
into my bedroom and start gnawing on things (for some reason she
prefers wires! - predominately the ones behind my computer). So far I
have lost 3 pairs of headphones to her and a charger for my Nintendo
DS, as well as the power cable for my cable modem.

Not only am I worried for her safety - what if she chews through an
actual higher voltage power cable? - I am annoyed at her behavior and
want her to stop. Luckily, I believe she only does this when I am
home!

Even if there is food in her bowl, but it is not a flavor she enjoys a
lot or if it has been sitting for a little while, she will come in and
start gnawing. I know that my behavior has only "trained" her to
continue - every time she does it I get angry, fed up, and end up
feeding her, so technically I'm rewarding her.

As I've pretty much always had her on wet food which requires smaller
portions more often, I'm wondering - should I sacrifice her ultimate
long term health with this natural food and get dry food that I can
put down in quantity? (Which then ultimately means she will overeat
and become fat and unhealthy)

I'm just kind of troubled as what to do here. I am currently
unemployed and can't afford to continuously replace these things she's
eating through - nor do I want to wake up and find her electrocuted! I
tried hot sauce, I tried Curry paste - Help!

bestcatflaps
April 20th 09, 04:14 PM
Smother the offeding wire with vasaline and coat with
pepper!! . . .Its worth a try and won't hurt the cat!