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View Full Version : Is Salmonella in "Essentials"-Arm and Hammer's New Corn Litter


harry
April 19th 09, 07:33 PM
Hello,

Today is Sunday and the Veterinarians have 'left the room' . . . so i
have some agonizing, wait-time on my hands, which i will spend with
you all . . .

I am having trouble with vomiting in young cats, and violent diarrhea/
death in less than 10-day-old kittens. I never experienced this before
in my life; also i never before used Arm and Hammer Essentials (corn
litter). Yes, itis CORN, i can feel the slick starch on my fingers
when wet.

Or does anyone have information on this condition. In my 73 (not
counting my first 3 years) years ihave never seen such a thing, so it
has to be something of a new-like nature.

Now i would like to introduce me and my kitties to you:

One kitten (the first to get this whatever it is) (about 3 months old)
was at deaths door, plus hanging half way over it (Vet. didnot expect
him to live. He could hardly stand let alone walk, and his eyes were
"fixed", as if he had already dead). FlufferNutter is a beautiful,
recessive-gene, black Angora, with a whole, new personality now, so i
guess he did die, but came back a new boy, and feral in a cute sort of
way. Should i change his name?? Ha-ha, just joking - - - i think . . .

I lost one kitten that was being bottle-fed and about two weeks old
(mother had no milk). Now one, from a litter of 6, from a non-inbred,
fantastic, young mother, is lying on my lap cold, weak, diarrhea and
dying. I am medicating him, but who knows what will happen. When the
bottle-fed one died i thought it was just because of the fact he was
being bottled-fed; i had just changed his milk to WalMart, kitten
formula, or he just wasnot growing etc; however, now i remember he had
a explosion of water/mucus (as in diarrhea), and i thought it meant he
wasnot getting any food whatever. Now i realize his death was from
this possible Salmonella, or whatever, that hasbeen effecting all the
cats at all ages (except of course for plush, suckie PiggyPen, who is
always trying to suck on my arms or anything else he can get at). He
is the most robust, healthy cat ever; with perfectly wide-eyed, round
eyes/with a slight insane look, and now i wonder if cats need
salt????? Does anyone know anything about salt and cats' health and or
resistance to illness?

Some of these kitties are quite in-bred, but this is a work in
progress, and iwill sort all of that out latter down my path of
possible success. The one kitty i introduced into the pride, to help
reduce the inbreeding, just had kitties, but no milk. She is a barn
kitty (a toad) and i have no details or knowledge about her pregnancy
etc.

Some kitties are out in the barn; theyare the toads (youhave to kiss a
lot of toads before you find a Prince); some, whoare semi-toads are
housed in the basement; my breeders are caged on the enclosed porch,
Non-pillow-****ers are permitted in the main house, but with so many
kitties itis hard to distinguish between non-pillow-****ers and pillow-
****ers, because youhave to catch them in the act. Therefore some
breeders spend a lot of time in their cage, which, mainly, is Sir
Fuzzbuttly, my main man, however i do walk him on sunny days (the few
we have here in the east side of Lake Erie area). My Two, huge,
beautiful, heart-breakingly magnificent, gorgeous, Siamese males are
pillow ****ers, so have been relegated to the basement, and iam
considering having them caged in the barn. I cannot keep up with all
the constant scrubbing for too much longer . . . itis killing
me . . .

Iam cross-posting this because i feel this Salmonella possiblility it
is of an urgency matter.

Truly

Truth will set you free John 8:32

PS two more have just died . . .

April 20th 09, 05:08 PM
On Apr 19, 2:33*pm, harry > wrote:
> Hello,
>
> Today is Sunday and the Veterinarians have 'left the room' . . . so i
> have some agonizing, wait-time on my hands, which i will spend with
> you all . . .
>

And you have ruled out feline distemper (panleukopenia), enteritis,
environmental toxins, and so forth? If these animals have not been
vaccinated for the various cat diseases, it is extremely common that
distemper runs through an entire group of unvaccinated cats with a 90%
+ fatality rate.

No litter is better or worse for Salmonella than any other litter.

Overt symptoms are somewhat unusual in cats or dogs - and with some,
they are symptom-free carriers. Only a test will confirm. But overt
signs include:

Vomiting
Diarrhea
Dehydration
Fever
Hypoglycemia
Lethargy
Stomach Gurgling
Refusing to Eat/Drink

Some times with blood present in excreta.

There are 24-hour vet clinics, but there is *NOTHING* you can do at
home about this unless you have access to all the equipment and drugs
that a vet might. And people-treatments might be worse for the cat
than the original disease if the wrong drug or drugs are given.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

harry
April 21st 09, 02:28 AM
On Apr 20, 12:08*pm, " > wrote:
> On Apr 19, 2:33*pm, harry > wrote:
>
> > Hello,
>
> > Today is Sunday and the Veterinarians have 'left the room' . . . so i
> > have some agonizing, wait-time on my hands, which i will spend with
> > you all . . .
>
> And you have ruled out feline distemper (panleukopenia), enteritis,
> environmental toxins, and so forth? If these animals have not been
> vaccinated for the various cat diseases, it is extremely common that
> distemper runs through an entire group of unvaccinated cats with a 90%
> + fatality rate.
>
> No litter is better or worse for Salmonella than any other litter.
>
> Overt symptoms are somewhat unusual in cats or dogs - and with some,
> they are symptom-free carriers. Only a test will confirm. But overt
> signs include:
>
> Vomiting
> Diarrhea
> Dehydration
> Fever
> Hypoglycemia
> Lethargy
> Stomach Gurgling
> Refusing to Eat/Drink
>
> Some times with blood present in excreta.
>
> There are 24-hour vet clinics, but there is *NOTHING* you can do at
> home about this unless you have access to all the equipment and drugs
> that a vet might. And people-treatments might be worse for the cat
> than the original disease if the wrong drug or drugs are given.
>
> Peter Wieck
> Melrose Park, PA

<
<

Hello,

How do you "innoculate" a new-born kitten . . .

The grown kitties have no ill effects; older kitties make it fine on
antibiotics, but these new-borns only make it to 10 days. They
forcefully, in one grand, watery, poop, forcefully poop out there
lives in screaming agony; continue to scream for a few minutes, then
settle down to a peaceful death except for an occasional weak scream.
It takes them about two days to die. They cannot nurse/swallow/eat: is
the first thing to let you know the condition is on. Iam learning this
as the kittens succumb - one right after the other. Thereare now 3
left out of two mothers' litters. The mothers seem to have scant milk
- iam thinking that is the stress.

Truth will set you free John 8:32

April 21st 09, 03:08 AM
On Apr 20, 9:28*pm, harry > wrote:

> How do you "innoculate" a new-born kitten . . .

a) Kittens inherit antibodies from their mothers for about the first 3
months of their lives via the colostrom - their first nursing. If they
do not get this, then they do not inherit the immunities. Newborn
bottle-fed, never-nursing kittens will not get this immunity and so
rarely survive as healthy cats. Not NEVER, but certainly rarely.

b) Adult cats that have been exposed to feline distemper and survived
it, and/or received immunities early in their lives may be resistant
to it, but not have sufficient and of the correct immunities to pass
it to their kittens. That is why it is critical that cats have their
immunizations at the correct intervals if they are allowed to breed -
even though the science does (somewhat) support a continuing
resistance even to a single effective course of immunizations. Much as
humans achieved permanent immunizations to Smallpox from a single
exposure to the vaccine - such that today the vaccine is no longer
given as a matter of course. But humans as with cats do not pass on
those immunities to their children as a permanent condition.

And unless you are in the true boonies, there are 24-hour clinics.
Further to that, most ethical vets will respond 24/7 if there is a
need. Our vet practice does not even charge extra to come to the house
(and they will, at short notice if needed) if it turns out that there
was a true emergency. We have been with them now for over 25 years for
just that reason.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

jmc
April 21st 09, 11:45 AM
Suddenly, without warning, harry exclaimed (4/20/2009 9:28 PM):
> On Apr 20, 12:08 pm, " > wrote:
>> On Apr 19, 2:33 pm, harry > wrote:
>>
>>> Hello,
>>> Today is Sunday and the Veterinarians have 'left the room' . . . so i
>>> have some agonizing, wait-time on my hands, which i will spend with
>>> you all . . .
>> And you have ruled out feline distemper (panleukopenia), enteritis,
>> environmental toxins, and so forth? If these animals have not been
>> vaccinated for the various cat diseases, it is extremely common that
>> distemper runs through an entire group of unvaccinated cats with a 90%
>> + fatality rate.
>>
>> No litter is better or worse for Salmonella than any other litter.
>>
>> Overt symptoms are somewhat unusual in cats or dogs - and with some,
>> they are symptom-free carriers. Only a test will confirm. But overt
>> signs include:
>>
>> Vomiting
>> Diarrhea
>> Dehydration
>> Fever
>> Hypoglycemia
>> Lethargy
>> Stomach Gurgling
>> Refusing to Eat/Drink
>>
>> Some times with blood present in excreta.
>>
>> There are 24-hour vet clinics, but there is *NOTHING* you can do at
>> home about this unless you have access to all the equipment and drugs
>> that a vet might. And people-treatments might be worse for the cat
>> than the original disease if the wrong drug or drugs are given.
>>
>> Peter Wieck
>> Melrose Park, PA
>
> <
> <
>
> Hello,
>
> How do you "innoculate" a new-born kitten . . .
>
> The grown kitties have no ill effects; older kitties make it fine on
> antibiotics, but these new-borns only make it to 10 days. They
> forcefully, in one grand, watery, poop, forcefully poop out there
> lives in screaming agony; continue to scream for a few minutes, then
> settle down to a peaceful death except for an occasional weak scream.
> It takes them about two days to die. They cannot nurse/swallow/eat: is
> the first thing to let you know the condition is on. Iam learning this
> as the kittens succumb - one right after the other. Thereare now 3
> left out of two mothers' litters. The mothers seem to have scant milk
> - iam thinking that is the stress.
>
> Truth will set you free John 8:32


Today is now Tuesday. Have you taken the surviving kittens to the vet
yet? I note your post was on Monday, so hopefully you have. If you
have not, forgive me for being blunt, but now *you* are killing these
kittens by denying them medical care. That'll actually get you arrested
in some states as animal abuse!

Please, please, please get the surviving kittens and the mother to the
clinic now, this minute, there still might be a chance to save them!

jmc