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peter[_2_]
May 23rd 09, 11:01 AM
hi,

i grow up with Siamese and we recently added one to our herd of two
other cats. the new one, annie foghorn (annie because she looked
anorexic and foghorn because she was in heat when we got her. she has
been fixed), has taken to vigorously squalling and pawing our bedroom
door at increasingly early times, today was 4:30 am. she also does this
to get in/out of the house. we do not "listen" to this behavior and do
not let her in/out until a few minutes after she stops.

i have taken to putting a bit of food out to catch her and put her out.

the other cats wait patiently to be fed or to go in/out. any suggestions
on eliminating this behavior?

peter

Matthew[_3_]
May 25th 09, 08:47 PM
"peter" > wrote in message
...
> hi,
>
> i grow up with Siamese and we recently added one to our herd of two other
> cats. the new one, annie foghorn (annie because she looked anorexic and
> foghorn because she was in heat when we got her. she has been fixed), has
> taken to vigorously squalling and pawing our bedroom door at increasingly
> early times, today was 4:30 am. she also does this to get in/out of the
> house. we do not "listen" to this behavior and do not let her in/out
> until a few minutes after she stops.
>
> i have taken to putting a bit of food out to catch her and put her out.
>
> the other cats wait patiently to be fed or to go in/out. any suggestions
> on eliminating this behavior?
>
> peter

get a hair dryer put it at the base of the door run an extension cord with
an on off switch or the clapper to your bed when the furball starts
click on the four leg will get the hint and one heck of learning lesson

jmc
May 25th 09, 09:50 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Matthew exclaimed (5/25/2009 3:47 PM):
> "peter" > wrote in message
> ...
>> hi,
>>
>> i grow up with Siamese and we recently added one to our herd of two other
>> cats. the new one, annie foghorn (annie because she looked anorexic and
>> foghorn because she was in heat when we got her. she has been fixed), has
>> taken to vigorously squalling and pawing our bedroom door at increasingly
>> early times, today was 4:30 am. she also does this to get in/out of the
>> house. we do not "listen" to this behavior and do not let her in/out
>> until a few minutes after she stops.
>>
>> i have taken to putting a bit of food out to catch her and put her out.
>>
>> the other cats wait patiently to be fed or to go in/out. any suggestions
>> on eliminating this behavior?
>>
>> peter
>
> get a hair dryer put it at the base of the door run an extension cord with
> an on off switch or the clapper to your bed when the furball starts
> click on the four leg will get the hint and one heck of learning lesson
>
>

I've not heard this with a hair dryer, usually a vaccum cleaner.
Ignoring the behavior does work, but I understand Siamese can be
particularly stubborn.

Keep doing what you're doing. You don't need to wait minutes, then she
might not "get it". Wait maybe 5-10 seconds after she goes quiet. Be
absolutely consistent. You give in *once*, you have undone any progress
you may have made.

You could just not let her out at all, which would of course be better,
and might be a good training tool. Eventually she might stop crying to
go out, because she's never allowed out.

As for the bedroom door, you could try in reverse. Leave the door open
at night, and if she wakes you, put her out of the bedroom, close the
door, then ignore her. It only took my kitten a total of two weeks to
get the point of this, and the lesson has stood well for the 13 years
we've had her.

jmc

Stan Brown
May 26th 09, 12:08 AM
Mon, 25 May 2009 16:50:10 -0400 from jmc
>:
> As for the bedroom door, you could try in reverse. Leave the door open
> at night, and if she wakes you, put her out of the bedroom, close the
> door, then ignore her. It only took my kitten a total of two weeks to
> get the point of this, and the lesson has stood well for the 13 years
> we've had her.

I like this idea. My cat has taken to waking me earlier and earlier
because it's dawn and he doesn't understand about clocks. :-) I
don't want to shut him out of the bedroom all night, but this might
be a nice way to teach him to let me sleep till I'm ready to get up.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

peter[_2_]
May 26th 09, 01:53 AM
Matthew wrote:
>>
>> peter
>
> get a hair dryer put it at the base of the door run an extension cord with
> an on off switch or the clapper to your bed when the furball starts
> click on the four leg will get the hint and one heck of learning lesson
>
this sounds like a good idea :) i was using pens last night from
behind but she sorts seems

to know where they came from

peter[_2_]
May 26th 09, 02:01 AM
jmc wrote:

>
> I've not heard this with a hair dryer, usually a vaccum cleaner.
> Ignoring the behavior does work, but I understand Siamese can be
> particularly stubborn.

thick is the word i had in mind :)
>
> Keep doing what you're doing. You don't need to wait minutes, then she
> might not "get it". Wait maybe 5-10 seconds after she goes quiet. Be
> absolutely consistent. You give in *once*, you have undone any progress
> you may have made.
yes

>
> You could just not let her out at all, which would of course be better,
> and might be a good training tool. Eventually she might stop crying to
> go out, because she's never allowed out.
the orange cat, "massive", (~19 lbs, has his own gravity field),
torments the himalian, 10 lbs, if they are not let out

>
> As for the bedroom door, you could try in reverse. Leave the door open
> at night, and if she wakes you, put her out of the bedroom, close the
> door, then ignore her.

i am afraid she might experience rapid deceleration against the bedroom
wall if she were to howl 2" away from our ears in the middle of the night



It only took my kitten a total of two weeks to
> get the point of this, and the lesson has stood well for the 13 years
> we've had her.
>
> jmc

Matthew[_3_]
May 26th 09, 04:50 AM
"peter" > wrote in message
...
> jmc wrote:
>
>>
>> I've not heard this with a hair dryer, usually a vaccum cleaner. Ignoring
>> the behavior does work, but I understand Siamese can be particularly
>> stubborn.
>
> thick is the word i had in mind :)
>>
>> Keep doing what you're doing. You don't need to wait minutes, then she
>> might not "get it". Wait maybe 5-10 seconds after she goes quiet. Be
>> absolutely consistent. You give in *once*, you have undone any progress
>> you may have made.
> yes
>
>>
>> You could just not let her out at all, which would of course be better,
>> and might be a good training tool. Eventually she might stop crying to
>> go out, because she's never allowed out.
> the orange cat, "massive", (~19 lbs, has his own gravity field), torments
> the himalian, 10 lbs, if they are not let out
>
>>
>> As for the bedroom door, you could try in reverse. Leave the door open
>> at night, and if she wakes you, put her out of the bedroom, close the
>> door, then ignore her.
>


> i am afraid she might experience rapid deceleration against the bedroom
> wall if she were to howl 2" away from our ears in the middle of the night
>

You know making stupid comments like that even if you are joking IS NOT
SOMETHING SO US FIND IN THE LEAST BIT FUNNY


>
> It only took my kitten a total of two weeks to
>> get the point of this, and the lesson has stood well for the 13 years
>> we've had her.
>>
>> jmc

peter[_2_]
May 26th 09, 12:02 PM
Matthew wrote:

>
> You know making stupid comments like that even if you are joking IS NOT
> SOMETHING SO US FIND IN THE LEAST BIT FUNNY
>
sorry to offend you, i was trying to keep good humour over a very
vexatious situation

Matthew[_3_]
May 26th 09, 02:45 PM
"peter" > wrote in message
...
> Matthew wrote:
>
>>
>> You know making stupid comments like that even if you are joking IS NOT
>> SOMETHING SO US FIND IN THE LEAST BIT FUNNY
>>
> sorry to offend you, i was trying to keep good humour over a very
> vexatious situation

I understand I was not one of the ones offended but there is no way for me
or anyone else to know you are joking about that unless you add a ;-) to it
or j/k. I know how you feel trust me Our new addition is doing a bad
habit and we can't break it yet. He is jumping the other cats which is
natural for a youngster but he is holding on when one of them runs and not
giving up when they hiss or start to fight back. I think he was raised with
a dog for I have seen this activity in young dogs. The rest of the pack
except Ka'shay has turned around and knocked the crap out of him but he
still does it. He did it to the alpha of the house; my 13 lb 10 year old
Rumble. Well Rumble taught him who is the alpha but he still does it to
Ka'shay who is so easy going that she ends up running under the bed and
staying there while he is around. Every time he sees her or hears her bell
he goes stalking her. Water gun, marbles in a can are not working. So far
the only that works is a can of compressed air and separating them by
keeping her in Mom's room which is fine with her since that is where she
spends all day anyways. And I don't hit animals so I know your frustration.


I am a firm believer in the saying words have no meaning without the voice
behind it

Granby
May 31st 09, 04:42 PM
All I know is Siamese cats don't follow the rules, they make them.

Piglet is part Siamese and ragdoll. She whines when she wants and is not
put off by anything I have tried. Lots of luck.
"peter" > wrote in message
...
> hi,
>
> i grow up with Siamese and we recently added one to our herd of two other
> cats. the new one, annie foghorn (annie because she looked anorexic and
> foghorn because she was in heat when we got her. she has been fixed), has
> taken to vigorously squalling and pawing our bedroom door at increasingly
> early times, today was 4:30 am. she also does this to get in/out of the
> house. we do not "listen" to this behavior and do not let her in/out
> until a few minutes after she stops.
>
> i have taken to putting a bit of food out to catch her and put her out.
>
> the other cats wait patiently to be fed or to go in/out. any suggestions
> on eliminating this behavior?
>
> peter