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Hactar
May 27th 09, 06:04 PM
We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
"non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during the
night there's nothing we can do.

Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a kickplate
mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty litter
for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a squirt
bottle to within firing range.

For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
"a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.

So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
prison.

--
I firmly believed we should not march into Baghdad ...To occupy Iraq
would instantly shatter our coalition, turning the whole Arab world
against us and make ... a latter-day Arab hero assigning young soldiers
to a fruitless hunt for a securely entrenched dictator[.] -- GHWB

cybercat
May 27th 09, 06:20 PM
"Hactar" > wrote in message
...
> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> "non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
> reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
> and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
> day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during the
> night there's nothing we can do.
>
> Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
> added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
> overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
> Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a kickplate
> mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
> the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty litter
> for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a squirt
> bottle to within firing range.
>
> For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
> http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
> until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
> on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
> after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
> "a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
> something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
> I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.
>
> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> prison.
>

Get your friend on a decent allergy medication, and get your cats things
they prefer to scratch on, like Alpine scratchers and tall post, and keep
their claws trimmed. Once a month does it for us. You can keep living in
this ridiculous way, but you know you don't want to. Although, if you do, it
will keep your cats occupied and laughing. Too funny.

jmc
May 27th 09, 11:53 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 1:04 PM):
> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> "non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
> reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
> and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
> day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during the
> night there's nothing we can do.
>
> Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
> added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
> overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
> Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a kickplate
> mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
> the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty litter
> for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a squirt
> bottle to within firing range.
>
> For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
> http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
> until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
> on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
> after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
> "a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
> something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
> I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.
>
> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> prison.
>

If they're sliding doors and have a top rail, then just get pieces of
wood that you can jam in the top rail, the cats can't reach 'em, problem
solved!

Alternately, maybe you can buy child-proof latches like for cabinets,
and modify them for use.

What you just need to think of is a kind of latch you can set up high
enough, and is complicated enough, and small enough, that a cat cannot
jump and undo it, or jump, hold on, and undo it.

I can understand your friend needing a cat-free zone, but you might just
want to give it up. If they're getting in there every night and have
for a while, it's no longer a cat-dander-free zone anyway, even if you
clean it really well, unless you replace the carpeting and the furniture.

jmc

Hactar
May 28th 09, 12:24 AM
In article >,
jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 1:04 PM):
> > We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> > "non-catty" sides of the house.

....

> > So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> > house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> > finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> > operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> > prison.
>
> If they're sliding doors and have a top rail, then just get pieces of
> wood that you can jam in the top rail, the cats can't reach 'em, problem
> solved!

Well, neither can some of the humans. It can be mounted lower though.
However, if I understand what you're recommending, that can't be operated
from both sides. And, they're not glass doors, they're wooden. Except
for the slide-or-swing/latch hardware the doors look like any other hollow
wooden interior door.

> Alternately, maybe you can buy child-proof latches like for cabinets,
> and modify them for use.
>
> What you just need to think of is a kind of latch you can set up high
> enough, and is complicated enough, and small enough, that a cat cannot
> jump and undo it, or jump, hold on, and undo it.

Maybe a door chain? Some kind of peg into the door along the back edge?

> I can understand your friend needing a cat-free zone, but you might just
> want to give it up. If they're getting in there every night and have
> for a while, it's no longer a cat-dander-free zone anyway, even if you
> clean it really well, unless you replace the carpeting and the furniture.

We had the floor redone from carpeting to wood, so that should reduce
the airborne contaminants considerably.

--
-eben royalty.mine.nu:81

Q: Why do black holes never learn?
A: Because they're too dense. -- ZurkisPhreek on Fark

Magic Mood Jeep
May 28th 09, 01:34 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 1:04 PM):
>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>> "non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
>> reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
>> and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
>> day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during
>> the
>> night there's nothing we can do.
>>
>> Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
>> added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
>> overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
>> Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a
>> kickplate
>> mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
>> the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty
>> litter
>> for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a
>> squirt
>> bottle to within firing range.
>>
>> For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
>> http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
>> until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
>> on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
>> after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
>> "a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
>> something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
>> I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.
>>
>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point
>> is
>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can
>> be
>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>> prison.
>>
>
> If they're sliding doors and have a top rail, then just get pieces of
> wood that you can jam in the top rail, the cats can't reach 'em, problem
> solved!


Pocket doors are not your typical sliding door found on most American
patios.

The "tracks" are hidden, inside the wall, and the door slides into the
wall when opened (some are even made to 'disappear when opened, so that
all an unsuspecting guest sees is a doorway, or opening in a wall) -
something 'on the track' that would stop the door from opening is not
feasible.
http://www.pocketdoors.net/index.php/history-of-pocket-doors

--
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her
wipe out Bunny's world domination.
--
The ONE and ONLY
lefthanded-pathetic-paranoid-psychotic-sarcastic-wiseass-ditzy
former-blonde
in Bloomington! (And proud of it, too)
email me at nalee1964 (at) comcast (dot) net
http://community.webshots.com/user/mgcmdjeep

jmc
May 28th 09, 01:59 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Magic Mood Jeep exclaimed (5/27/2009 8:34 PM):
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 1:04 PM):
>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>> "non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
>>> reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
>>> and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
>>> day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during
>>> the
>>> night there's nothing we can do.
>>>
>>> Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
>>> added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
>>> overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
>>> Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a
>>> kickplate
>>> mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
>>> the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty
>>> litter
>>> for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a
>>> squirt
>>> bottle to within firing range.
>>>
>>> For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
>>> http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
>>> until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
>>> on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
>>> after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
>>> "a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
>>> something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
>>> I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.
>>>
>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point
>>> is
>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can
>>> be
>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>> prison.
>>>
>> If they're sliding doors and have a top rail, then just get pieces of
>> wood that you can jam in the top rail, the cats can't reach 'em, problem
>> solved!
>
>
> Pocket doors are not your typical sliding door found on most American
> patios.
>
> The "tracks" are hidden, inside the wall, and the door slides into the
> wall when opened (some are even made to 'disappear when opened, so that
> all an unsuspecting guest sees is a doorway, or opening in a wall) -
> something 'on the track' that would stop the door from opening is not
> feasible.
> http://www.pocketdoors.net/index.php/history-of-pocket-doors
>

Oh, yea, I remember now. I think we had those doors in the house I grew
up with, before they were removed and used to shore up the garage floor
(which was a crime, they were beautiful cherry wood doors!)

jmc

jmc
May 28th 09, 02:03 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 7:24 PM):
> In article >,
> jmc > wrote:

>> What you just need to think of is a kind of latch you can set up high
>> enough, and is complicated enough, and small enough, that a cat cannot
>> jump and undo it, or jump, hold on, and undo it.
>
> Maybe a door chain? Some kind of peg into the door along the back edge?
>

I think a door chain would work well, but put the sliding bit
up-and-down at a slight angle instead of horizontal, or it'd be
difficult to set it up to both latch properly, and keep the doors closed
enough to keep the cats out. You could set it for just wide enough to
slide a hand thru, so you could unlatch it from either side (you wanted
to be able to do that, right?

Oh, and did you know that there is such a thing as a "pocket door
latch"? - google it. Not sure if that's what you need, but here's one:

http://tinyurl.com/onhsea

jmc

Hactar
May 28th 09, 02:37 AM
In article >,
jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/27/2009 7:24 PM):
> > In article >,
> > jmc > wrote:
>
> >> What you just need to think of is a kind of latch you can set up high
> >> enough, and is complicated enough, and small enough, that a cat cannot
> >> jump and undo it, or jump, hold on, and undo it.
> >
> > Maybe a door chain? Some kind of peg into the door along the back edge?
>
> I think a door chain would work well, but put the sliding bit
> up-and-down at a slight angle instead of horizontal, or it'd be
> difficult to set it up to both latch properly, and keep the doors closed
> enough to keep the cats out. You could set it for just wide enough to
> slide a hand thru, so you could unlatch it from either side (you wanted
> to be able to do that, right?
>
> Oh, and did you know that there is such a thing as a "pocket door
> latch"? - google it. Not sure if that's what you need, but here's one:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/onhsea

That looks like what we have that doesn't hold. I'll look for sturdier
varieties.

--
-eben http://royalty.mine.nu:81

"You're one of those condescending Unix computer users!"
"Here's a nickel, kid. Get yourself a better computer" - Dilbert

MLB
May 29th 09, 12:36 AM
Hactar wrote:
> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> "non-catty" sides of the house. The house is divided like this for two
> reasons: I have a friend who's very allergic to cat and rabbit dander,
> and the non-c side of the house isn't remotely catproofed. During the
> day they normally stay with the humans in the catty side, but during the
> night there's nothing we can do.
>
> Usually, cat #1 forces a door open then both cats take advantage of the
> added room. Both the doors have built-in latches, but those are easily
> overridden. Now, one of the doors (the one they use most often) has
> Velcro (or a generic) on the door's leading edge, as well as a kickplate
> mounted vertically (to eliminate claw damage). And in front of where
> the doors close there's a 1-gal jug for one and a 4 lb bag of kitty litter
> for the other. Those usually slow her down long enough to bring a squirt
> bottle to within firing range.
>
> For a few days we had two "Ssscat"s
> http://www.multivet.net/en/products/ssscat/
> until (I gather) it got knocked over and quickly dumped its propellant
> on the floor. While they lasted, they worked well. I figure that
> after a while they may not have to be turned on; I don't know how long
> "a while" is however. I've ordered some refills. I would prefer
> something that didn't go off on humans, but it's better than nothing.
> I'll tape down the refills to make sure they can't get knocked over.
>
> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> prison.
>

How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
would work.

Hactar
May 29th 09, 04:43 AM
In article >, MLB > wrote:
> Hactar wrote:
> > We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> > "non-catty" sides of the house.
> >
> > So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> > house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> > finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> > operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> > prison.
>
> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
> would work.

Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
to put significant force on the mounting.

--
-eben royalty.mine.nu:81
LIBRA: A big promotion is just around the corner for someone
much more talented than you. Laughter is the very best medicine,
remember that when your appendix bursts next week. -- Weird Al

jmc
May 29th 09, 11:33 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Hactar exclaimed (5/28/2009 11:43 PM):
> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>> Hactar wrote:
>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>
>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>> prison.
>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>> would work.
>
> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
> to put significant force on the mounting.
>

Nah - just add a bit of stiff wire to the hook so that it sticks thru to
the other side - then the door only needs to open wide enough for the
bit of wire.

jmc

MLB
May 30th 09, 01:01 AM
Hactar wrote:
> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>> Hactar wrote:
>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>
>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>> prison.
>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>> would work.
>
> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
> to put significant force on the mounting.
>

You could put one on each side. MLB

Hactar
May 30th 09, 01:12 AM
In article >, MLB > wrote:
> Hactar wrote:
> > In article >, MLB > wrote:
> >> Hactar wrote:
> >>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> >>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
> >>>
> >>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> >>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> >>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> >>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> >>> prison.
> >> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
> >> would work.
> >
> > Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
> > higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
> > should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
> > a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
> > do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
> > to put significant force on the mounting.
>
> You could put one on each side. MLB

They'd have to be linked. If the inner one is locked, you're blocked
from entering the room unless you can change it somehow.

Anyhow, I got some refills for my Ssscats and made them pretty well
untippable (and un-accidently-reaimable), so I'll see if that works.

--
The mnky gibbering and screeching used to keep me up at night, although
in the lst week or so it's prtty mch tailed off to nthng. The smell has
gttn noticbly worse in the last cple of days, too. The next time I get
a barrl full of mnkys, I'm going to try taking the lid off. -groo, AFCA

AZ Nomad[_2_]
May 30th 09, 01:14 AM
On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:01:36 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>Hactar wrote:
>> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>>> Hactar wrote:
>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>>
>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>>> prison.
>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>>> would work.
>>
>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
>> to put significant force on the mounting.
>>

>You could put one on each side. MLB

Is this a joke? Close the door.

Want some thing easy for humans but impossible for cats? There's a lovely
invention that has been around for centuries. It's called a door knob.

MLB
May 30th 09, 01:38 AM
AZ Nomad wrote:
> On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:01:36 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>> Hactar wrote:
>>> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>>>> Hactar wrote:
>>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>>>
>>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>>>> prison.
>>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>>>> would work.
>>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
>>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
>>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
>>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
>>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
>>> to put significant force on the mounting.
>>>
>
>> You could put one on each side. MLB
>
> Is this a joke? Close the door.
>
> Want some thing easy for humans but impossible for cats? There's a lovely
> invention that has been around for centuries. It's called a door knob.


He said this is a pocket door -- no knobs. MLB

AZ Nomad[_2_]
May 30th 09, 01:58 AM
On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:38:34 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>AZ Nomad wrote:
>> On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:01:36 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>>> Hactar wrote:
>>>> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>>>>> Hactar wrote:
>>>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>>>>> prison.
>>>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>>>>> would work.
>>>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
>>>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
>>>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
>>>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
>>>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
>>>> to put significant force on the mounting.
>>>>
>>
>>> You could put one on each side. MLB
>>
>> Is this a joke? Close the door.
>>
>> Want some thing easy for humans but impossible for cats? There's a lovely
>> invention that has been around for centuries. It's called a door knob.


>He said this is a pocket door -- no knobs. MLB
thanks. I knew I must have missed something.

There are locks available for pocket doors.

https://www.hardwareworld.com/334-10b-Pocket-Door-Lock-pYB7J88.aspx

http://www.johnsonhardware.com/1521.htm

http://www.handlesets.com/index.cfm?page=product:display&productid=991B&manufacturer=Ives&categoryID=269

Hactar
May 30th 09, 02:27 AM
In article >,
AZ Nomad > wrote:
> On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:01:36 -0600, MLB > wrote:
> >Hactar wrote:
> >> In article >, MLB
> > wrote:
> >>> Hactar wrote:
> >>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> >>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
> >>>>
> >>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> >>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> >>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> >>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> >>>> prison.
> >>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
> >>> would work.
> >>
> >> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
> >> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
> >> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
> >> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
> >> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
> >> to put significant force on the mounting.
> >>
>
> >You could put one on each side. MLB
>
> Is this a joke? Close the door.

Won't stay closed under cat assault. Note in the first sentence where I
stated that these are "sliding (pocket) doors". They don't have strong
latches.

> Want some thing easy for humans but impossible for cats? There's a lovely
> invention that has been around for centuries. It's called a door knob.

See my previous paragraph.
--
-eben http://royalty.mine.nu:81
GEMINI: Your birthday party will be ruined once again by your explosive
flatulence. Your love life will run into trouble when your fiancee hurls
a javelin through your chest. -- Weird Al, _Your Horoscope for Today_

AZ Nomad[_2_]
May 30th 09, 03:17 AM
On Fri, 29 May 2009 21:34:04 -0400, Hactar > wrote:
>In article >,
>AZ Nomad > wrote:
>> On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:38:34 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>> >AZ Nomad wrote:
>> >> On Fri, 29 May 2009 18:01:36 -0600, MLB > wrote:
>> >>> Hactar wrote:
>> >>>> In article >, MLB
>> > wrote:
>> >>>>> Hactar wrote:
>> >>>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>> >>>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>> >>>>>>
>> >>>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>> >>>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>> >>>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>> >>>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>> >>>>>> prison.
>> >>>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>> >>>>> would work.
>> >>>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
>> >>>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
>> >>>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
>> >>>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
>> >>>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
>> >>>> to put significant force on the mounting.
>> >>>>
>> >>> You could put one on each side. MLB
>> >>
>> >> Is this a joke? Close the door.
>> >>
>> >> Want some thing easy for humans but impossible for cats? There's a lovely
>> >> invention that has been around for centuries. It's called a door knob.
>>
>> >He said this is a pocket door -- no knobs. MLB
>> thanks. I knew I must have missed something.
>>
>> There are locks available for pocket doors.
>>
>> https://www.hardwareworld.com/334-10b-Pocket-Door-Lock-pYB7J88.aspx

>2nd quoted paragraph, 4th line. This is only operable from one side,
>assuming it's like the similar-looking one from Kwikset. (I checked.)

>> http://www.johnsonhardware.com/1521.htm

>Interesting. I'll look into it.

>> http://www.handlesets.com/index.cfm?page=product:display&productid=991B&manufacturer=Ives&categoryID=269

>Appears to have the lock mechanism on only one side: "Pre-assembled for
>doors opening left to right. Plates are reversible." If the mechanism
>were on both sides, it wouldn't _need_ to be reversed.

They can be nonsymetrical yet be accessible from either side. It depends
on the shape of the striker.

The ones I've seen can be opened from either side, but only locked from
one side.

MLB
May 30th 09, 03:37 AM
Hactar wrote:
> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>> Hactar wrote:
>>> In article >, MLB > wrote:
>>>> Hactar wrote:
>>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
>>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
>>>>>
>>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
>>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
>>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
>>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
>>>>> prison.
>>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
>>>> would work.
>>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
>>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
>>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
>>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
>>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
>>> to put significant force on the mounting.
>> You could put one on each side. MLB
>
> They'd have to be linked. If the inner one is locked, you're blocked
> from entering the room unless you can change it somehow.
>
> Anyhow, I got some refills for my Ssscats and made them pretty well
> untippable (and un-accidently-reaimable), so I'll see if that works.
>

How many people going in and out? If there is only one person, there is
no proble,. MLB

Hactar
May 31st 09, 05:09 AM
In article >, MLB > wrote:
> Hactar wrote:
> > In article >, MLB > wrote:
> >> Hactar wrote:
> >>> In article >, MLB > wrote:
> >>>> Hactar wrote:
> >>>>> We have sliding (pocket) doors connecting the "catty" and (ostensibly)
> >>>>> "non-catty" sides of the house.
> >>>>>
> >>>>> So, is there anything that can reliably keep the cats in their half the
> >>>>> house? I'm thinking about a latch for the doors. The sticking point is
> >>>>> finding something that's easy for humans and impossible for cats, can be
> >>>>> operated from both sides, and doesn't make it look like we're in a
> >>>>> prison.
> >>>> How about a hook and eye near the top of the door? Not beautiful but it
> >>>> would work.
> >>> Hook and eye is inoperable by cats, especially these cats. It can't be
> >>> higher than a seated person can reach, but about as high as a doorknob
> >>> should be OK. It'd have to have enough slack in the mechanism to allow
> >>> a hand through so you could work it from both sides; I dunno if you can
> >>> do that unless your hook is long enough to allow enough of a cat through
> >>> to put significant force on the mounting.
> >> You could put one on each side. MLB
> >
> > They'd have to be linked. If the inner one is locked, you're blocked
> > from entering the room unless you can change it somehow.
> >
> > Anyhow, I got some refills for my Ssscats and made them pretty well
> > untippable (and un-accidently-reaimable), so I'll see if that works.
>
> How many people going in and out? If there is only one person, there is
> no proble,. MLB

Three. Cat #1 waits halfway across the room, then darts through the
door if she sees it open. (She's deaf, so she can't hear you approach
it.) If you're carrying something, there's by far room for a cat to get
through. Cat #2 waits until someone (e.g. Cat #1) leaves the door open and
then goes through.

--
-eben royalty.mine.nu:81

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity,
and I'm not sure about the former." -- Albert Einstein