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dragon[_2_]
May 28th 09, 04:08 PM
We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
years old. He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. We'd like to take him in
this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
spraying. Any experiences you can share?

---MIKE---
May 28th 09, 04:23 PM
When I adopted Ike (RB) at age 9 he had just been neutered. He never
sprayed.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Sweetness
May 28th 09, 07:41 PM
dragon wrote:
> We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
> years old. He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
> he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. We'd like to take him in
> this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
> spraying. Any experiences you can share?

Once its balls are gone it won't spray.

(Ignore the subject line, that's just to get AZ Nomad going. Heehee)

--
What would Fred Hall say ?

May 28th 09, 07:43 PM
On May 28, 10:08*am, dragon > wrote:
> We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
> years old. *He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
> he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. *We'd like to take him in
> this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
> spraying. *Any experiences you can share?

It's really hard to know if he'll stop spraying. After neutering, it
will take several weeks for his hormones to level out. Only after that
will you know. IMO I would get him neutered now--the younger he's
neutered, the better. You can also buy a Feliway diffuser once you
bring him in. They were designed for cats who spray/urinate
inappropriately.

Bob Larter
May 29th 09, 11:37 AM
Sweetness wrote:
> dragon wrote:
>> We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
>> years old. He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
>> he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. We'd like to take him in
>> this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
>> spraying. Any experiences you can share?
>
> Once its balls are gone it won't spray.
>
> (Ignore the subject line, that's just to get AZ Nomad going. Heehee)

**** off, froger.

--
W
. | ,. w , "Some people are alive only because
\|/ \|/ it is illegal to kill them." Perna condita delenda est
---^----^---------------------------------------------------------------

Sweetness
May 29th 09, 03:17 PM
Netmask wrote:
>
> I have placed the poster "sweetness" in my email killfile so the posts
> no longer appear - it would be best if he was ignored. As the saying
> goes "don't feed the troll" You need a better mail client than Outlook
> Express to set up a killfile but you could always setup a rule to block
> his rantings.

X-Complaints-To:

Report sent.

The next one's going to your local police if you keep it up. Think I'm
kidding or trolling or whatever? Notice that certain others haven't
been posting lately -- guess what happened to them. Yeah. You can't
use Usenet from jail.

--
What would Fred Hall say ?

Wingnut
May 29th 09, 08:48 PM
"Netmask" > wrote in message
...
> I have placed the poster "sweetness" in my email killfile so the posts
> no longer appear - it would be best if he was ignored. As the saying goes
> "don't feed the troll" You need a better mail client than Outlook Express
> to set up a killfile but you could always setup a rule to block his
> rantings. Some immature persons get some comfort out of outraging others
> and feeding off the "bite" so the best strategy is to simply ignore.

Outlook Express has a killfile feature (Mr. Sweetness currently resides
there). You just go to "Message" and then "Block Sender".

Calvin
May 31st 09, 03:29 AM
On May 28, 11:08*am, dragon > wrote:
> We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
> years old. *He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
> he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. *We'd like to take him in
> this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
> spraying. *Any experiences you can share?

A stray tomcat that I adopted and had neutered in 2003
continued to spray. He may not have done it as much as
before he was neutered but he continued to do it from time
to time until he died five years later (last year).

It was not really a bad problem, though, because he did not
live in the main part of the house. He lived in the basement
and fenced in back yard with some other cats.

Granby
June 3rd 09, 01:51 PM
My son has four male cats around his house. It stopped three from spraying
and greatly slowed down, but not stop the fourth. FYI
"Cathy" > wrote in message
...
>
> "dragon" > wrote in message
> ...
>> We've been looking after a stray since last fall who is at least two
>> years old. He's intact and I'm wondering what the chances are that
>> he'll stop spraying once we get him fixed. We'd like to take him in
>> this winter and will pay for the neutering if it will stop his
>> spraying. Any experiences you can share?
>
> I've had 3 neighborhood intact stray toms neutered, one 10 years ago, and
> two other in the last year to year & a half. All were sexually mature at
> the time of their ops, & one was known to spray beforehand. I adopted the
> first stray, & he's never sprayed in the house. The other two were adopted
> by neighbors around the corner form me, one of the cats being the known
> sprayer. He no longer sprays - in their house or mine (he still visits
> here now & again). That's anecdotal, of course - I don't know the actual
> stats. Neutering helps greatly, but doesn't guarantee no more spraying:
> another neighbor's cat was neutered when they adopted him as a small
> kitten, & he's been spraying for the last few years - reason unknown.
>
> In any event, I'd personally get him neutered, even if it didn't halt his
> spraying - no more possibility of him impregnating another cat & producing
> yet more strays...
>
> Cathy
>
>
>