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John Hinson[_2_]
June 3rd 09, 12:14 AM
Hello,

I had Daisy spayed today; I was shocked at the length ot the incision
(about 4 inches) and now wonder about the credentials of the vet.

I'm really upset about this and blame myself for maybe not asking
enough questions about the surgery beforehand.

When I adopted my first 2 cats the SPCA spayed them before I took them
home. Their incisions were only about an inch long and I didn't have
to take them back to have stitches removed.

Are there different surgical techniques that explain the disparity?

Thanks.

Netmask
June 3rd 09, 01:55 AM
John Hinson wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I had Daisy spayed today; I was shocked at the length ot the incision
> (about 4 inches) and now wonder about the credentials of the vet.
>
> I'm really upset about this and blame myself for maybe not asking
> enough questions about the surgery beforehand.
>
> When I adopted my first 2 cats the SPCA spayed them before I took them
> home. Their incisions were only about an inch long and I didn't have
> to take them back to have stitches removed.
>
> Are there different surgical techniques that explain the disparity?
>
> Thanks.

50 to 100mm seems to be the normal range and yes there are different
techniques employed just as in human surgery. If you have any
preferences you should ask about the technique employed.

Asking "what is the best?" is a meaningless question as there will be
dozens of answers depending on ones perspective.

Regardless whether internal or external suturing or a combination of
both have been employed one should always return the cat for inspection
a week to 10 days post operation to check for inflammation and possible
infections. Not sure of the system in the USA but in Australia there is
normally no charge for the post operation inspection and is expected.

Some veterinary surgeons are now doing keyhole surgery which results in
much smaller wound sites and quicker recovery time and in most cases
lessens the possibility of post operative infections.

It pays to write out a list of questions before hand just as you would
for yourself imo

John Hinson[_2_]
June 3rd 09, 02:15 AM
I didn't realize that there would be a variety of techniques of what
I had perceived to be a rather straight-forward procedure.

I merely assumed it would be as simple as my first 2 went through.

I wish I had known enough to inquire.

I still have her 5 kittens to be de-sexed: I will definately do better
by them.

Thanks.

On Wed, 03 Jun 2009 00:55:35 GMT, Netmask >
wrote:

>John Hinson wrote:
>> Hello,
>>
>> I had Daisy spayed today; I was shocked at the length ot the incision
>> (about 4 inches) and now wonder about the credentials of the vet.
>>
>> I'm really upset about this and blame myself for maybe not asking
>> enough questions about the surgery beforehand.
>>
>> When I adopted my first 2 cats the SPCA spayed them before I took them
>> home. Their incisions were only about an inch long and I didn't have
>> to take them back to have stitches removed.
>>
>> Are there different surgical techniques that explain the disparity?
>>
>> Thanks.
>
>50 to 100mm seems to be the normal range and yes there are different
>techniques employed just as in human surgery. If you have any
>preferences you should ask about the technique employed.
>
>Asking "what is the best?" is a meaningless question as there will be
>dozens of answers depending on ones perspective.
>
>Regardless whether internal or external suturing or a combination of
>both have been employed one should always return the cat for inspection
>a week to 10 days post operation to check for inflammation and possible
>infections. Not sure of the system in the USA but in Australia there is
>normally no charge for the post operation inspection and is expected.
>
>Some veterinary surgeons are now doing keyhole surgery which results in
>much smaller wound sites and quicker recovery time and in most cases
>lessens the possibility of post operative infections.
>
>It pays to write out a list of questions before hand just as you would
>for yourself imo

Granby
June 3rd 09, 02:58 AM
I would call the vet and ask why the difference. You may want to go
elsewhere or, maybe there is a really good reason. If you don't like what
he says then go elsewhere. I have 3 cats done by the same vet, two females
and a male. The girls have scars that one is and inch long and the other is
two and a half inches. Vet said it had to do with the placements of things
on the inside of the cat. Who knows but they did fine. All you can do is
ask.
"John Hinson" > wrote in message
...
>I didn't realize that there would be a variety of techniques of what
> I had perceived to be a rather straight-forward procedure.
>
> I merely assumed it would be as simple as my first 2 went through.
>
> I wish I had known enough to inquire.
>
> I still have her 5 kittens to be de-sexed: I will definately do better
> by them.
>
> Thanks.
>
> On Wed, 03 Jun 2009 00:55:35 GMT, Netmask >
> wrote:
>
>>John Hinson wrote:
>>> Hello,
>>>
>>> I had Daisy spayed today; I was shocked at the length ot the incision
>>> (about 4 inches) and now wonder about the credentials of the vet.
>>>
>>> I'm really upset about this and blame myself for maybe not asking
>>> enough questions about the surgery beforehand.
>>>
>>> When I adopted my first 2 cats the SPCA spayed them before I took them
>>> home. Their incisions were only about an inch long and I didn't have
>>> to take them back to have stitches removed.
>>>
>>> Are there different surgical techniques that explain the disparity?
>>>
>>> Thanks.
>>
>>50 to 100mm seems to be the normal range and yes there are different
>>techniques employed just as in human surgery. If you have any
>>preferences you should ask about the technique employed.
>>
>>Asking "what is the best?" is a meaningless question as there will be
>>dozens of answers depending on ones perspective.
>>
>>Regardless whether internal or external suturing or a combination of
>>both have been employed one should always return the cat for inspection
>>a week to 10 days post operation to check for inflammation and possible
>>infections. Not sure of the system in the USA but in Australia there is
>>normally no charge for the post operation inspection and is expected.
>>
>>Some veterinary surgeons are now doing keyhole surgery which results in
>>much smaller wound sites and quicker recovery time and in most cases
>>lessens the possibility of post operative infections.
>>
>>It pays to write out a list of questions before hand just as you would
>>for yourself imo

June 3rd 09, 05:08 PM
On Jun 2, 8:58*pm, "Granby" > wrote:
> I would call the vet and ask why the difference. *You may want to go
> elsewhere or, maybe there is a really good reason. *If you don't like what
> he says then go elsewhere. *I have 3 cats done by the same vet, two females
> and a male. *The girls have scars that one is and inch long and the other is
> two and a half inches. *Vet said it had to do with the placements of things
> on the inside of the cat. *Who knows but they did fine. *All you can do is
> ask."John Hinson" > wrote in message
>

I agree with Granby--call or stop by and ask. Don't beat yourself up
about why you didn't ask about the incision beforehand. I doubt many
people would think to ask that. Just keep a close eye on her incision
to make sure it's healing properly.

Janet
June 3rd 09, 09:04 PM
John Hinson wrote:
> Hello,
>
> I had Daisy spayed today; I was shocked at the length ot the incision
> (about 4 inches) and now wonder about the credentials of the vet.
>
> I'm really upset about this and blame myself for maybe not asking
> enough questions about the surgery beforehand.
>
> When I adopted my first 2 cats the SPCA spayed them before I took them
> home. Their incisions were only about an inch long and I didn't have
> to take them back to have stitches removed.
>
> Are there different surgical techniques that explain the disparity?
>
> Thanks.

Could this have something to do with the cat having recently had kittens?
Size of past-partum uterus, etc?

John Hinson[_2_]
June 6th 09, 03:40 PM
I plan to ask about it when I take her back to have the stitches
removed on the 15th.

She is doing okay; not happy about the collar, naturally, but is
adjusting and seems to be on the mend.

I'm trying to keep her calm by keeping her in the front bedroom by
herself. I go in and remove her collar and feed her some canned food
that I puree' in the blender with some unsalted chicken broth.

After she finishes I sit with her for a while and watch her until she
starts trying to bite the stitches and then put the collar back on.

My biggest problem is trying to get her kittens adopted out. They're
12 weeks old now and are driving my other cats nuts. Me too!

My first two cats, Callie & Coie won't leave the bedroom and spend
most of the day on top of or hiding under the bed.

Lily will go in the kitchen but travels about by jumping from
countertop to countertop and on the refrigerator. She spends most of
the day in the bedroom closet or under the bed.

There is an adoption event tomorrow. Hope I can get some adopted out.


On Wed, 3 Jun 2009 09:08:50 -0700 (PDT),
wrote:

>On Jun 2, 8:58*pm, "Granby" > wrote:
>> I would call the vet and ask why the difference. *You may want to go
>> elsewhere or, maybe there is a really good reason. *If you don't like what
>> he says then go elsewhere. *I have 3 cats done by the same vet, two females
>> and a male. *The girls have scars that one is and inch long and the other is
>> two and a half inches. *Vet said it had to do with the placements of things
>> on the inside of the cat. *Who knows but they did fine. *All you can do is
>> ask."John Hinson" > wrote in message
>>
>
>I agree with Granby--call or stop by and ask. Don't beat yourself up
>about why you didn't ask about the incision beforehand. I doubt many
>people would think to ask that. Just keep a close eye on her incision
>to make sure it's healing properly.