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Deuteros
July 16th 09, 03:41 PM
I posted about this here several months ago:

I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
behavior seems normal.

He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).

And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.

I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
choice but to put him outside.

Rene S
July 16th 09, 04:57 PM
I hope you are kidding about putting him outside. . .

I am not sure why your vet would suggest a high fiber food, unless he
thought your cat was constipated. IMO he should have a wet, grain free
diet (NO dry).

I would add at least one more box, possibly two in new location, He
might not like the location of one of the boxes. Also, what kind of
litter do you use? Try an unscented litter, or set out some boxes with
different kinds of litter to see what he likes. You can also try a
brand of litter called Cat Attract, which has an herbal additive
designed to lure cats back to their boxes (it does help, I've used
it).

Also, are any of your boxes covered? If yes, remove the covers to see
if that helps.

How often do you scoop your boxes? MINIMUM once per day, twice is much
better.

Remove any and all items from your floor to lessen the temptation.
Clean any soiled areas thoroughly with an enzymatic cleaner such as
Petzyme.

Deuteros
July 16th 09, 05:13 PM
Both boxes are uncovered. Litter is unscented. Both boxes are cleaned
every day and fresh litter is added. Spots have been cleaned (he
doesn't poop in the same place twice and now he is pooping on our
furniture).

Matthew[_3_]
July 16th 09, 05:50 PM
IF they vet has ruled out medical than it is behavioral something has the
cat ****ed or nervous about the environment. take a look around is there a
new person in the house, is there a lot of stress in the household animals
can pick up on it. the cat is telling you something you just have to figure
it out.

Oh a little FYI don't freaking make comments like you did. All you will do
is **** people off and end up becoming a target. even if you are desperate
and say it and don't mean it.

"Deuteros" > wrote in message
...
> Both boxes are uncovered. Litter is unscented. Both boxes are cleaned
> every day and fresh litter is added. Spots have been cleaned (he
> doesn't poop in the same place twice and now he is pooping on our
> furniture).

cybercat
July 16th 09, 07:06 PM
"Deuteros" > wrote:.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.

I had a cat that did this. The only thing that worked was to confine her in
the utility room with her box, bed, toys, and food and water, and go see her
and praise her and give her a lot of attention from time to time. After a
couple of days, I let her out. If she "eliminated inappropriately" again,
back in she went. She stopped after three-four times being confined. And she
stopped for years.

Rene S
July 16th 09, 08:24 PM
On Jul 16, 11:50*am, "Matthew" >
wrote:
> IF they vet has ruled out medical *than it is behavioral *something has the
> cat ****ed or nervous about the environment. *take a look around *is there a
> new person in the house, is there a lot of stress in the household animals
> can pick up on it. *the cat is telling you something you just have to figure
> it out.


Matthew has a point. Has anything stressful happened in the household
lately--new person, different hours due to job, moving furniture? Cats
can get upset with changes in routine.

Try adding some extra boxes and see what happens. At this point, what
do you have to lose by trying this?

MaryL
July 18th 09, 06:50 PM
"Deuteros" > wrote in message
...
>I posted about this here several months ago:
>
> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
> behavior seems normal.
>
> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>
> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.

Does your cat show any signs of arthritis or pain in his paws? By any
chance, has your cat been declawed? I had a cat a number of years ago that
had been declawed on all four paws (done *before* I adopted her). She
eventually began to poop outside the litter box (and, still later, to
urinate outside the box). I watched her an finally realized that her feet
were tender, and it seemed that the coarse litter might be aggravating them.
I searched for the very *softest* litter I could find and settled on Better
Way. That solved the problem for several years. As she aged, she eventually
went back to urinating outside the box. Fortunately, she kept using the same
spot, so I did not have the problem all over the house. I considered that to
be a medical problem and not a behavioral problem (but not one that was
picked up by the vet), and I just kept cleaning as best I could. After she
died at the age of 16, I had that area of carpet and padding removed, sealed
the concrete underneath, and replaced the carpet (just a small square of
carpet--not an entire room). Anyway, if any of this is a possibility, you
might want to consider looking at the *texture* of the litter. You have
already said you use unscented litter, which is appropriate.

You have also said that the litter is scooped daily. It might be a good idea
to scoop at least twice daily and see if that makes a difference. How often
do you completely change litter instead of just adding litter on top?
Sometimes we make the mistake of not changing it often enough because our
noses are not as sensitive as a cat's nose.
I would also like to reinforce what Rene wrote. I am not a vet, but I do
know that high fiber food can increase the bulk and density of feces. That
can make it very uncomfortable for a cat, particularly if constipation is
involved. I have had my best results with a good quality *no carbs/grains*
canned food--NO dry food.

If you eventually decide that this is a behavioral problem, please do *not*
consider putting him outside. Instead, I suggest that you contact Tufts
consider the Tufts University Petfax Program (through their School of
Veterinary Medicine). The Tufts Petfax Program is a consulting service for
pet behavioral problems. I have read many positive reports about them, and
my sister used the service at one time. She had done everything she could
think of to solve aspraying problem, and her entire house reeked. This
service was very helpful. I think the original consultation is $250.00, but
it included an extensive written report and 3 follow-ups (with some options
for telephone consultation). She had great success after following their
advice. There is a report to fill out first, and the people who posted
about it stressed that it is very important to include *all details.*

Here are two links --
Tufts School of Veterinary Medicine Petfax Program:
http://www.tufts.edu/vet/petfax/
About the Petfax Program:
http://www.tufts.edu/vet/petfax/about.html

MaryL

starcat
July 18th 09, 09:04 PM
"Deuteros" > wrote in message
...
>I posted about this here several months ago:
>
> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
> behavior seems normal.
>
> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>
> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.

I have a Persian who started doing that at the age of 6. I too took him to
the vet to rule out medical problems and then settled on behavioral issues.
First thing I did, though, was switch him to a high quality food. He gets
either Wellness or Natural Balance now. It helped a lot. Then I added not
one, but TWO extra litter pans in different rooms where he was pooping.
Since my pans were covered, I added an uncovered one. So far, he's gone
four weeks without an accident. If he recurs, I'm going to try Feliway
next, since that worked great once before for a cat who had pee/marking
issues.

The thing is to not give up. Your cat is very tuned in to his environment,
and there's something about that which doesn't suit him and scares him off
from using his pan for pooping. It's possible he had a painful or
uncomfortable poop, and he now associates his pan with that.

If worse comes to worse, try confining him to a room or two during the times
he's most apt to go, like after eating. Making him an outside cat should
definitely not be an option, and it won't help the pooping inside when he is
inside anyways.

Don't give up. Something's going on, and you just have to figure out what
it is.

Marcia Berg
July 20th 09, 05:48 AM
Deuteros wrote:

> I posted about this here several months ago:
>
> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
> behavior seems normal.
>
> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>
> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.






Cats are much like dogs in one respect; If you rub the cat's nose in
the crap a couple of times, the ****ting around the house should stop.

Matthew[_3_]
July 20th 09, 06:48 AM
"Marcia Berg" > wrote in message
...
> Deuteros wrote:
>
>> I posted about this here several months ago:
>>
>> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
>> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
>> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
>> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
>> behavior seems normal.
>>
>> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
>> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
>> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
>> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
>> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
>> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>>
>> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
>> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>>
>> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
>> choice but to put him outside.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Cats are much like dogs in one respect; If you rub the cat's nose in
> the crap a couple of times, the ****ting around the house should stop.


Um YOU ARE ABSOLUTELY WRONG IN BOTH ASPECTS


All you just did was tell them he good spot to use as a bathroom

now move back to the Beatles news group and Jewish social site and be a
complete idiot there

MaryL
July 20th 09, 07:35 AM
"Marcia Berg" > wrote in message
...
> Deuteros wrote:
>
>> I posted about this here several months ago:
>>
>> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
>> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
>> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
>> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
>> behavior seems normal.
>>
>> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
>> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
>> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
>> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
>> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
>> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>>
>> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
>> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>>
>> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
>> choice but to put him outside.
>
>
>
>
>
>
> Cats are much like dogs in one respect; If you rub the cat's nose in
> the crap a couple of times, the ****ting around the house should stop.
>
>

ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! This is meaningless cruelty. The poor cat will not
associate inappropriate litterbox habits with rubbing his nose in it. This
will simply cause him to fear and distrust, but it will not solve the
problem. You are advocating an antiquated procedure that was disproved many
years ago.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

---MIKE---
July 20th 09, 12:50 PM
Tiger will on occasion leave a poop on the floor. It seems to be a case
of the poop sticking to his butt and dropping off later (a klingon).


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

MaryL
July 20th 09, 01:57 PM
"---MIKE---" > wrote in message
...
Tiger will on occasion leave a poop on the floor. It seems to be a case
of the poop sticking to his butt and dropping off later (a klingon).


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

That's a different issue than what the OP asked about. Some people even
shave (actually, trim) that area if the fur is long enough that there are a
lot of klingons (or worse).

MaryL

jweeks
July 20th 09, 07:21 PM
On Jul 16, 10:41*am, Deuteros > wrote:
> I posted about this here several months ago:
>
> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
> behavior seems normal.
>
> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>
> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.

jweeks
July 20th 09, 07:26 PM
On Jul 16, 10:41*am, Deuteros > wrote:
> I posted about this here several months ago:
>
> I have a 7 year old male cat. He's had no behavior problems since
> we've had him but several months ago he started pooping on the floor
> in random places. He still poops in his litter box sometimes and he is
> still peeing in the box (as far as I can tell). Other than that his
> behavior seems normal.
>
> He has two litter boxes because he likes to poop and pee in separate
> boxes. I took him to the vet and spent $250 for them to do all sorts
> of tests and conclude that he is perfectly healthy. The vet did tell
> me to switch him to a high fiber cat food which I did and that seemed
> to work for about two weeks and then he was back to pooping on the
> floor again (today he crapped all over my couch).
>
> And he doesn't just poop on the floor, he has to poop on whatever we
> leave out on the floor, be it a magazine, shirt, book, etc.
>
> I don't know what else to do and if he doesn't stop I'll have no
> choice but to put him outside.

I agree it's behavioral...and that it could be an environmental
change...have you changed floor cleaners? Added a new air freshener,
changed laundry detergents...? also, could it be that the litter
you're using has changed at the manufacturer? Maybe they've added a
new agent to the mix...I use World's Best Litter...it's made out of
corn and is fantastic. The cat loves it- he's 8 years old and I
switched about a year ago. It also clumps so I just scoop everything
out easily so there's never a urine smell, ie ammonia at all...I
actually wash the box itself out every two weeks and put new bags,
etc. Also...are YOU or anyone else going through any sort of
emotional stress? Change in job, money worries etc? This is
rhetorical- don't answer...but think about it. Animals are very
sensitive and they don't know how to tell us when something is
bothering them...etc..... ~ Jenny ^..^ '