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FirstHit
July 20th 09, 09:59 AM
There is a sweet cat I am interested in at the shelter. The cat looks
emaciated. She is sickly right now and is not very energetic, but she
is eating and I hope she will put on weight. If the cat gains weight
and starts appearing to be healthier, I wonder if she will be plagued
with health problems down the line. I have heard that fatty liver
disease can take hold in cats after just 24-48 hours of not eating,
and this cat looks like she's had a lot of time without food.

This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
and shows a lot of affection.

If anyone has some wisdom with situations like this, I would
appreciate hearing what you have to say. I think she is about four
years old.

FirstHit

jweeks
July 20th 09, 07:05 PM
On Jul 20, 4:59*am, FirstHit > wrote:
> There is a sweet cat I am interested in at the shelter. *The cat looks
> emaciated. *She is sickly right now and is not very energetic, but she
> is eating and I hope she will put on weight. *If the cat gains weight
> and starts appearing to be healthier, I wonder if she will be plagued
> with health problems down the line. *I have heard that fatty liver
> disease can take hold in cats after just 24-48 hours of not eating,
> and this cat looks like she's had a lot of time without food.
>
> This kitty touches my heart. *She is a bit shy but if you gently
> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
> and shows a lot of affection.
>
> If anyone has some wisdom with situations like this, I would
> appreciate hearing what you have to say. *I think she is about four
> years old.
>
> FirstHit

Hi, if she touches your heart, she is meant to live with you...because
you probably touch her's. As far as health concerns, my cat was fine
when I got him from the shelter...I grew up with cats and they've
always lived very long lives. One of my dogs was emaciated when I got
him from the pound...the vet didn't know if he was 9 months or 3 years
old! He was like one of those dying dogs on Animal Cops...that was 10
years ago. He's fantastic! I don't buy his kibble from the
supermarket...I always try to spend more on dog and cat food because
it saves vet bills down the road...So if you get your kitty...get her
the proper nutrition and she'll have a long healthy life with you...I
recommend EVO...GreatLife4Pets- doctor's Finest online is the VERY
best I've found......Spend at least 12.00 and up on a dry food for a 4
lb bag..it'll last almost all month. If your kitty is getting proper
nutrition, she won't always be hungry...you'll a huge difference. My
cat and 2 dogs are all seniors and you'd never know it...they all run
and play and are like kittens and puppies still. Take her home today
and be happy..My best to you! ~ Jenny ^..^ '

Rene
July 20th 09, 07:13 PM
> This kitty touches my heart. *She is a bit shy but if you gently
> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
> and shows a lot of affection.

She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
Many cats don't do well in a shelter environment, so she may just be
upset and not eating as much as she should. Cages are very stressful
for cats.

Many shelters offer a one-month free trial of pet insurance. Get her
in to the vet right away for bloodwork, check up, etc.

IMO I would not feed dry food, but that's another topic. . .

cybercat
July 20th 09, 07:50 PM
"Rene" > wrote in message
...

> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
> and shows a lot of affection.

She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.


Yes.

Granby
July 20th 09, 11:27 PM
Keep us posted on how it goes but, take her home!!!!!!!
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Rene" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
>> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
>> and shows a lot of affection.
>
> She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
>
>
> Yes.
>

FirstHit
July 21st 09, 08:37 AM
On Jul 20, 3:27 pm, "Granby" > wrote:
> Keep us posted on how it goes but, take her home!!!!!!!"cybercat" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > "Rene" > wrote in message
> ...
>
> >> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
> >> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
> >> and shows a lot of affection.
>
> > She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
>
> > Yes.

Thanks to all for your responses. I agree that when you connect with
a potential adoptee that all concerned can really miss out on
something special if you get hung up on some issue which might not be
big at all. Still, I would like to learn what I can about her
situation.

I can't take the kitty home right now for several reasons, including
heath issues with an elderly parent. Additionally, my temporarily out-
of-town partner has to approve of the cat too, and the shelter
requires that he be there before the cat can go home with me. Bottom
line is there is a good chance I will lose her, but I also think she
may be there for a while. Most people go for the kittens there, and
there are a number of very friendly, outgoing, healthy adults there
too, so this shy and skinny kitty is not taken very seriously by the
people that I've observed there.

If she is adopted by someone else, the person will probably be the
nurturing type, so she'll *probably* have a good home. I know for
sure that if she comes home with me a while from now she will have a
loving home. I am normally home most of the time and would love to
give her lots of attention.

I was browsing the shelters mostly to get an idea of what kinds of
cats are available; I had planned on getting a cat in a month or two
down the line. I have found a few cats that I connected with in
addition to the emaciated cat. I guess it was my own nurturing nature
that got me thinking that there is a possibility that I might be able
to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
up on her and get to know her better.

FirstHit

sativasam
July 21st 09, 09:14 AM
Maybe you could get her a bag of 'posh nosh' as a gift to help build her up.

"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
> On Jul 20, 3:27 pm, "Granby" > wrote:
>> Keep us posted on how it goes but, take her home!!!!!!!"cybercat"
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > "Rene" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>> >> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
>> >> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
>> >> and shows a lot of affection.
>>
>> > She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
>>
>> > Yes.
>
> Thanks to all for your responses. I agree that when you connect with
> a potential adoptee that all concerned can really miss out on
> something special if you get hung up on some issue which might not be
> big at all. Still, I would like to learn what I can about her
> situation.
>
> I can't take the kitty home right now for several reasons, including
> heath issues with an elderly parent. Additionally, my temporarily out-
> of-town partner has to approve of the cat too, and the shelter
> requires that he be there before the cat can go home with me. Bottom
> line is there is a good chance I will lose her, but I also think she
> may be there for a while. Most people go for the kittens there, and
> there are a number of very friendly, outgoing, healthy adults there
> too, so this shy and skinny kitty is not taken very seriously by the
> people that I've observed there.
>
> If she is adopted by someone else, the person will probably be the
> nurturing type, so she'll *probably* have a good home. I know for
> sure that if she comes home with me a while from now she will have a
> loving home. I am normally home most of the time and would love to
> give her lots of attention.
>
> I was browsing the shelters mostly to get an idea of what kinds of
> cats are available; I had planned on getting a cat in a month or two
> down the line. I have found a few cats that I connected with in
> addition to the emaciated cat. I guess it was my own nurturing nature
> that got me thinking that there is a possibility that I might be able
> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
> up on her and get to know her better.
>
> FirstHit

cybercat
July 21st 09, 08:52 PM
"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
> On Jul 20, 3:27 pm, "Granby" > wrote:
>> Keep us posted on how it goes but, take her home!!!!!!!"cybercat"
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > "Rene" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>> >> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
>> >> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
>> >> and shows a lot of affection.
>>
>> > She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
>>
>> > Yes.
>
> Thanks to all for your responses. I agree that when you connect with
> a potential adoptee that all concerned can really miss out on
> something special if you get hung up on some issue which might not be
> big at all. Still, I would like to learn what I can about her
> situation.
>
> I can't take the kitty home right now for several reasons, including
> heath issues with an elderly parent. Additionally, my temporarily out-
> of-town partner has to approve of the cat too, and the shelter
> requires that he be there before the cat can go home with me. Bottom
> line is there is a good chance I will lose her, but I also think she
> may be there for a while. Most people go for the kittens there, and
> there are a number of very friendly, outgoing, healthy adults there
> too, so this shy and skinny kitty is not taken very seriously by the
> people that I've observed there.
>
> If she is adopted by someone else, the person will probably be the
> nurturing type, so she'll *probably* have a good home. I know for
> sure that if she comes home with me a while from now she will have a
> loving home. I am normally home most of the time and would love to
> give her lots of attention.
>
> I was browsing the shelters mostly to get an idea of what kinds of
> cats are available; I had planned on getting a cat in a month or two
> down the line. I have found a few cats that I connected with in
> addition to the emaciated cat. I guess it was my own nurturing nature
> that got me thinking that there is a possibility that I might be able
> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
> up on her and get to know her better.
>

Well just break everybody's ****ing heart. ASSHOLE.

MaryL
July 21st 09, 09:13 PM
"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
> On Jul 20, 3:27 pm, "Granby" > wrote:
>> Keep us posted on how it goes but, take her home!!!!!!!"cybercat"
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > "Rene" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>> >> This kitty touches my heart. She is a bit shy but if you gently
>> >> approach her and speak softly to her she opens up to you right away
>> >> and shows a lot of affection.
>>
>> > She is "speaking" to you. Put your concerns aside and take her home.
>>
>> > Yes.
>
> Thanks to all for your responses. I agree that when you connect with
> a potential adoptee that all concerned can really miss out on
> something special if you get hung up on some issue which might not be
> big at all. Still, I would like to learn what I can about her
> situation.
>
> I can't take the kitty home right now for several reasons, including
> heath issues with an elderly parent. Additionally, my temporarily out-
> of-town partner has to approve of the cat too, and the shelter
> requires that he be there before the cat can go home with me. Bottom
> line is there is a good chance I will lose her, but I also think she
> may be there for a while. Most people go for the kittens there, and
> there are a number of very friendly, outgoing, healthy adults there
> too, so this shy and skinny kitty is not taken very seriously by the
> people that I've observed there.
>
> If she is adopted by someone else, the person will probably be the
> nurturing type, so she'll *probably* have a good home. I know for
> sure that if she comes home with me a while from now she will have a
> loving home. I am normally home most of the time and would love to
> give her lots of attention.
>
> I was browsing the shelters mostly to get an idea of what kinds of
> cats are available; I had planned on getting a cat in a month or two
> down the line. I have found a few cats that I connected with in
> addition to the emaciated cat. I guess it was my own nurturing nature
> that got me thinking that there is a possibility that I might be able
> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
> up on her and get to know her better.
>
> FirstHit

Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to adopt
may be her death sentence. If you will adopt her, give her good care and
love, you may be surprised at how well she adapts. At the very least, have
her checked by a vet to see if you can give her the love and care she needs.
My little Duffy was in the shelter for several months. He was skinny and
looked like a little old man--think of a cat being in a cage and hearing
dogs barking and all sorts of other commotion, and it's no wonder that he
did not look well. After just a short time in his new home, he began to
perk up and he is now a *gorgeous* and *healthy* cat. But, more
importantly, he is a *happy* and *well adjusted* kitty. Please take a look
at the first picture in his album (under my sig) and compare that to how he
looks now.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

cybercat
July 21st 09, 09:54 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
>> up on her and get to know her better.
>>
>> FirstHit
>
> Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to adopt
> may be her death sentence.


Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good home
for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this asshole
finds her and adopts her.

MaryL
July 21st 09, 11:15 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>>> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
>>> up on her and get to know her better.
>>>
>>> FirstHit
>>
>> Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to
>> adopt may be her death sentence.
>
>
> Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good
> home for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this
> asshole finds her and adopts her.

Well, I have to admit that was my first thought. It hurts me every time I
hear of a cat (or dog) that is left lingering in a shelter as people bypass
them for a "more perfect" companion. But it's true that "any home" is not
necessarily better.

MaryL

cybercat
July 21st 09, 11:53 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>>>> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
>>>> up on her and get to know her better.
>>>>
>>>> FirstHit
>>>
>>> Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to
>>> adopt may be her death sentence.
>>
>>
>> Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good
>> home for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this
>> asshole finds her and adopts her.
>
> Well, I have to admit that was my first thought. It hurts me every time I
> hear of a cat (or dog) that is left lingering in a shelter as people
> bypass them for a "more perfect" companion. But it's true that "any home"
> is not necessarily better.
>

You know me. If I had not already gotten into trouble doing stuff like this
before, I'd be trying to find out where the cat is.

FirstHit
July 22nd 09, 10:28 AM
On Jul 21, 1:54 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>
> >> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
> >> up on her and get to know her better.
>
> >> FirstHit
>
> > Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to adopt
> > may be her death sentence.
>
> Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good home
> for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this asshole
> finds her and adopts her.

Cybercat, I was stunned by your attacks on me and my character. Your
hostility was uncalled for.

If I were the coldhearted A-hole you say I am, I would have passed the
poor kitty up and never given her a second thought, and I certainly
wouldn't have posted about her here.

I am working on the situation day to day, and right now the only thing
I can do is visit her and talk to others about her. As I said before,
my partner is out of town/state, and the shelter's policy is that all
household members have to come to the shelter to interact with the cat
before the adoption can take place. I'm not allowed to take the cat
home now! I also mentioned my elderly dad's health issue. He lives
out of state, and his recent breathing issues and health decline lead
me to believe I might need to take a trip there soon. If I leave town
for a week or more after I bring her home, that's not going to be good
for the cat, and I don't want to subject her to that. I personally
don't feel I should have to elaborate on these personal matters to
you. I hope this clears up why I can't have kitty right now and may
never be able to have her.

FirstHit

FirstHit
July 22nd 09, 10:30 AM
On Jul 21, 3:15 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
> >>> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
> >>> up on her and get to know her better.
>
> >>> FirstHit
>
> >> Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to
> >> adopt may be her death sentence.
>
> > Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good
> > home for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this
> > asshole finds her and adopts her.
>
> Well, I have to admit that was my first thought. It hurts me every time I
> hear of a cat (or dog) that is left lingering in a shelter as people bypass
> them for a "more perfect" companion. But it's true that "any home" is not
> necessarily better.

MaryL, I'm sad to see that you've had unflattering thoughts of me. Do
you think I'm bypassing the undernourished kitty for a "more perfect"
companion? I thought I kind of indicated in my second post that I had
connected with a few other kitties but my nurturing nature had drawn
me to the skinny girl over the others. Maybe that wasn't perfectly
clear, but otherwise I wouldn't have made my original post.

FirstHit

MaryL
July 24th 09, 02:01 AM
"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
> On Jul 21, 3:15 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>> "cybercat" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>> >>> to love and help her. For now, I will be visiting her often to check
>> >>> up on her and get to know her better.
>>
>> >>> FirstHit
>>
>> >> Please reconsider. Leaving her in the shelter for "someone else" to
>> >> adopt may be her death sentence.
>>
>> > Do you really think someone this coldhearted could ever provide a good
>> > home for a cat? I sure don't. Let's just hope someone better than this
>> > asshole finds her and adopts her.
>>
>> Well, I have to admit that was my first thought. It hurts me every time
>> I
>> hear of a cat (or dog) that is left lingering in a shelter as people
>> bypass
>> them for a "more perfect" companion. But it's true that "any home" is
>> not
>> necessarily better.
>
> MaryL, I'm sad to see that you've had unflattering thoughts of me. Do
> you think I'm bypassing the undernourished kitty for a "more perfect"
> companion? I thought I kind of indicated in my second post that I had
> connected with a few other kitties but my nurturing nature had drawn
> me to the skinny girl over the others. Maybe that wasn't perfectly
> clear, but otherwise I wouldn't have made my original post.
>
> FirstHit

Yes, that was my reaction to your original post, but I was disturbed by your
next post when you began to talk only about visiting and the possibility of
others adopting, etc. A cat that has problems usually never gets adopted
and many (perhaps most) are euthanized. "Visiting" simply does not overcome
those problems. My Duffy is an example of cats that remain in the shelter
for months--a perfectly wonderful little cat but bypassed for several months
because he is blind. Actually, he was fortunate because the people in that
shelter clearly wanted to find a home for him, so they kept him far longer
than usual. And then I became the lucky person who got to adopt him. I
*hope* I overreacted, and in that case, I will apologize. That is, I hope
you will not decide to move on to "healthier" cats and leave the emaciated
cat behind.

MaryL

cyberpurrs
July 24th 09, 02:35 AM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote
>> MaryL, I'm sad to see that you've had unflattering thoughts of me. Do
>> you think I'm bypassing the undernourished kitty for a "more perfect"
>> companion? I thought I kind of indicated in my second post that I had
>> connected with a few other kitties but my nurturing nature had drawn
>> me to the skinny girl over the others. Maybe that wasn't perfectly
>> clear, but otherwise I wouldn't have made my original post.
>>
>> FirstHit
>
> Yes, that was my reaction to your original post, but I was disturbed by
> your next post when you began to talk only about visiting and the
> possibility of others adopting, etc. A cat that has problems usually
> never gets adopted and many (perhaps most) are euthanized. "Visiting"
> simply does not overcome those problems. My Duffy is an example of cats
> that remain in the shelter for months--a perfectly wonderful little cat
> but bypassed for several months because he is blind. Actually, he was
> fortunate because the people in that shelter clearly wanted to find a home
> for him, so they kept him far longer than usual. And then I became the
> lucky person who got to adopt him. I *hope* I overreacted, and in that
> case, I will apologize. That is, I hope you will not decide to move on to
> "healthier" cats and leave the emaciated cat behind.
>
He has already made this decision.

FirstHit
July 26th 09, 09:52 AM
On Jul 23, 6:01 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:

> > MaryL, I'm sad to see that you've had unflattering thoughts of me. Do
> > you think I'm bypassing the undernourished kitty for a "more perfect"
> > companion? I thought I kind of indicated in my second post that I had
> > connected with a few other kitties but my nurturing nature had drawn
> > me to the skinny girl over the others. Maybe that wasn't perfectly
> > clear, but otherwise I wouldn't have made my original post.
>
> > FirstHit
>
> Yes, that was my reaction to your original post, but I was disturbed by your
> next post when you began to talk only about visiting and the possibility of
> others adopting, etc. A cat that has problems usually never gets adopted
> and many (perhaps most) are euthanized. "Visiting" simply does not overcome
> those problems. My Duffy is an example of cats that remain in the shelter
> for months--a perfectly wonderful little cat but bypassed for several months
> because he is blind. Actually, he was fortunate because the people in that
> shelter clearly wanted to find a home for him, so they kept him far longer
> than usual. And then I became the lucky person who got to adopt him. I
> *hope* I overreacted, and in that case, I will apologize. That is, I hope
> you will not decide to move on to "healthier" cats and leave the emaciated
> cat behind.
>
> MaryL

MaryL,

I looked at Duffy's pictures, and he looks great! I am glad that you
and Duffy found each other and are making each other happy!

I did talk about others adopting, but I know others might not take
her. She is definitely more on my radar screen than the "perfect"
kitties I connected with. I'm not taking the attitude that I don't
need to be concerned about her because others will worry about her.

I agree that visiting is no substitute for taking a kitty home. But
at the moment, visiting and voicing concerns to the people at the
shelter is the best I can do. My visits with her last about 45
minutes. Friday I learned that she has other visitors, and between
the lot of us I think it does do her some good emotionally because she
has company and must see that she is valued.

You may be wondering why I have been looking in the shelters at a time
when there are obstacles to bringing a new cat home. Near the end of
May, I had to make the decision to put my cat to sleep. She had
kidney disease and was my angel for 16.5 years. Her death has been a
real blow to me. By the beginning of July, I started wanting to open
my heart to another cat. I began looking in the shelters to get an
idea of what the cats there were like and also just to get some feline
love. Soon I connected with a couple of healthy cats and then met the
skinny kitty.

The shelter is giving her some special attention to fatten her up. (I
know this is not like being in a home.) I have seen some progress in
her mood and playfulness, but I can't tell with my eye if she's
gaining weight. They have no intention of euthanizing her and haven't
euthanized a cat in a long time.

FirstHit

MaryL
July 26th 09, 01:27 PM
"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
> On Jul 23, 6:01 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>
>> > MaryL, I'm sad to see that you've had unflattering thoughts of me. Do
>> > you think I'm bypassing the undernourished kitty for a "more perfect"
>> > companion? I thought I kind of indicated in my second post that I had
>> > connected with a few other kitties but my nurturing nature had drawn
>> > me to the skinny girl over the others. Maybe that wasn't perfectly
>> > clear, but otherwise I wouldn't have made my original post.
>>
>> > FirstHit
>>
>> Yes, that was my reaction to your original post, but I was disturbed by
>> your
>> next post when you began to talk only about visiting and the possibility
>> of
>> others adopting, etc. A cat that has problems usually never gets adopted
>> and many (perhaps most) are euthanized. "Visiting" simply does not
>> overcome
>> those problems. My Duffy is an example of cats that remain in the
>> shelter
>> for months--a perfectly wonderful little cat but bypassed for several
>> months
>> because he is blind. Actually, he was fortunate because the people in
>> that
>> shelter clearly wanted to find a home for him, so they kept him far
>> longer
>> than usual. And then I became the lucky person who got to adopt him. I
>> *hope* I overreacted, and in that case, I will apologize. That is, I
>> hope
>> you will not decide to move on to "healthier" cats and leave the
>> emaciated
>> cat behind.
>>
>> MaryL
>
> MaryL,
>
> I looked at Duffy's pictures, and he looks great! I am glad that you
> and Duffy found each other and are making each other happy!
>
> I did talk about others adopting, but I know others might not take
> her. She is definitely more on my radar screen than the "perfect"
> kitties I connected with. I'm not taking the attitude that I don't
> need to be concerned about her because others will worry about her.
>
> I agree that visiting is no substitute for taking a kitty home. But
> at the moment, visiting and voicing concerns to the people at the
> shelter is the best I can do. My visits with her last about 45
> minutes. Friday I learned that she has other visitors, and between
> the lot of us I think it does do her some good emotionally because she
> has company and must see that she is valued.
>
> You may be wondering why I have been looking in the shelters at a time
> when there are obstacles to bringing a new cat home. Near the end of
> May, I had to make the decision to put my cat to sleep. She had
> kidney disease and was my angel for 16.5 years. Her death has been a
> real blow to me. By the beginning of July, I started wanting to open
> my heart to another cat. I began looking in the shelters to get an
> idea of what the cats there were like and also just to get some feline
> love. Soon I connected with a couple of healthy cats and then met the
> skinny kitty.
>
> The shelter is giving her some special attention to fatten her up. (I
> know this is not like being in a home.) I have seen some progress in
> her mood and playfulness, but I can't tell with my eye if she's
> gaining weight. They have no intention of euthanizing her and haven't
> euthanized a cat in a long time.
>
> FirstHit


But: This kitty really needs a home. A home with loving, caring people.
There simply is no substitute for that. When will your partner be home so
the two of you can make a decision? I was sorry to read about your father's
health problems, but your partner should be able to take care of kitty if
you have to make a trip out of town. Adoption might be something good for
all of you--you, your partner, and kitty.

MaryL