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Kathy
October 20th 09, 03:42 PM
We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
suggestions?

Kathy

cybercat
October 20th 09, 03:53 PM
"Kathy" > wrote in message
...


> forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's 7
> months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
> suggestions?

A loud "OW" and withdrawing, no more playing, no petting, no attention at
all is a good place to start. And don't use your hands to play with the cat,
use a toy like a feather on a stick. Don't smack him and don't spray him
with water, just a loud OW and withdraw. Over and over again. Bless you for
taking him in and getting him the vet care he needs. BTW, I think you can
find a vet who will neuter him before he is 7 months old.

Rene S.
October 20th 09, 09:19 PM
I agree with what cybercat says--use a toy or laser light to play with
him, never your hands. If he does bite your hand, yell OW loudly and
let your hand go limp. Quietly and slowly get up and stop the play
session. He'll learn quickly.

Make sure to play with him regularly to release that energy--he has a
lot right now.

I also agree with cybercat about asking another vet about neutering
him sooner. The idea of waiting until 6 months or later to perform the
surgery is outdated thinking.

Kathy
October 20th 09, 10:05 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Kathy" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>
>> forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's 7
>> months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
>> suggestions?
>
> A loud "OW" and withdrawing, no more playing, no petting, no attention at
> all is a good place to start.

That's funny, because that was my instinct. He does stop when I do
that, but goes right back to it in a minute.

And don't use your hands to play with the cat,

That's probably my mistake. I tickle him and poke him while playing (my
form of roughhousing with the little guy), probably just encouraging the
biting. I'll stop doing that, though I hate to.

> use a toy like a feather on a stick. Don't smack him and don't spray him
> with water, just a loud OW and withdraw. Over and over again. Bless you for
> taking him in and getting him the vet care he needs. BTW, I think you can
> find a vet who will neuter him before he is 7 months old.
>

Thanks.

Kathy

Kathy
October 20th 09, 10:07 PM
Rene S. wrote:
> I agree with what cybercat says--use a toy or laser light to play with
> him, never your hands. If he does bite your hand, yell OW loudly and
> let your hand go limp. Quietly and slowly get up and stop the play
> session. He'll learn quickly.
>
> Make sure to play with him regularly to release that energy--he has a
> lot right now.
>
> I also agree with cybercat about asking another vet about neutering
> him sooner. The idea of waiting until 6 months or later to perform the
> surgery is outdated thinking.

Can't think of leaving my vet (he's been great) but maybe if I ask him,
he'll do it sooner.

Thanks.

Kathy

cybercat
October 20th 09, 10:23 PM
"Kathy" > wrote
>
> And don't use your hands to play with the cat,
>
> That's probably my mistake. I tickle him and poke him while playing (my
> form of roughhousing with the little guy), probably just encouraging the
> biting. I'll stop doing that, though I hate to.
>

It's so much fun when they are little. :) Problem is they get bigger.

cybercat
October 20th 09, 10:24 PM
"Kathy" > wrote
> Can't think of leaving my vet (he's been great) but maybe if I ask him,
> he'll do it sooner.
>
You could show him some research. Google Cornell Veterinary Hospital they
are pretty respected, and see what they have to say about neutering age.
Good luck. He is very lucky to have you. Also we love pictures. If you put
some of him up, do post a link so we can see him. :)

dberrycat
October 20th 09, 10:41 PM
On Oct 20, 10:42*am, Kathy > wrote:
> We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
> approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
> me. *He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
> which cleared right up with medication. *He was given tests (all
> negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
> happy and thriving. *The only problem is he bites. *Just my hands and
> forearms but it's painful. *The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
> 7 months old. *Is it likely that will help with the biting? *Any other
> suggestions?
>
> Kathy

Thank you for taking this kitten in. It sounds like you and he are
doing
great, except for the biting issue. That is commonly a problem when
a young kitten doesn't get well socialized living with his mom and
siblings.
They will bite and "attack" because they haven't learned cat manners.
When they bite mom or other kittens, they get a loud yell or hiss or
swat. You need to give him similar feed back when he bites you.
I have found that a hiss works. They soon learn and when they get
bitten by other kittens themselves they realize that it hurts! If you
are
interested in adopting another kitten to be his buddy, he will
probably
learn better manners from the other kitten and he will have someone
to play with and use up some energy.

Teach him that hands and feet are not playthings. Never play with him
by wrestling him with your hands or feet. Using a stuffed animal that
is about his size or a thick oven mitt on your hand will allow him to
wrestle, but not directly with your hand. Play with him with
a feline flyer (stick, string, feather on the end) or a feather wand,
a stuffed mouse on a string (don't leave strings or ribbons out when
you are not supervising, they can be swallowed and cause GI
problems), a plastic or cloth tape measure, balls with jingles in
them.

Hope that helps a little. Good luck.

Debbie

Kathy
October 21st 09, 04:38 AM
dberrycat wrote:
> On Oct 20, 10:42 am, Kathy > wrote:
>> We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
>> approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
>> me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
>> which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
>> negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
>> happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
>> forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
>> 7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
>> suggestions?
>>
>> Kathy
>
> Thank you for taking this kitten in. It sounds like you and he are
> doing
> great, except for the biting issue. That is commonly a problem when
> a young kitten doesn't get well socialized living with his mom and
> siblings.
> They will bite and "attack" because they haven't learned cat manners.
> When they bite mom or other kittens, they get a loud yell or hiss or
> swat. You need to give him similar feed back when he bites you.
> I have found that a hiss works. They soon learn and when they get
> bitten by other kittens themselves they realize that it hurts! If you
> are
> interested in adopting another kitten to be his buddy, he will
> probably
> learn better manners from the other kitten and he will have someone
> to play with and use up some energy.
>
> Teach him that hands and feet are not playthings. Never play with him
> by wrestling him with your hands or feet. Using a stuffed animal that
> is about his size or a thick oven mitt on your hand will allow him to
> wrestle, but not directly with your hand. Play with him with
> a feline flyer (stick, string, feather on the end) or a feather wand,
> a stuffed mouse on a string (don't leave strings or ribbons out when
> you are not supervising, they can be swallowed and cause GI
> problems), a plastic or cloth tape measure, balls with jingles in
> them.
>
> Hope that helps a little. Good luck.
>
> Debbie

A big thanks to you and everyone who responded. I'll check back with a
progress report!

Kathy

Gandalf
October 21st 09, 08:24 AM
On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 10:42:17 -0400, Kathy > wrote:

>We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
>approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
>me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
>which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
>negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
>happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
>forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
>7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
>suggestions?
>
>Kathy


he vet said he can't be neutered until he's
months old. WTF. It's TIME to get him spayed NOW, or he nay start
spraying.

You need a MUCH better vet.

It's pretty routine now for most vets to do spays, which are a MUCH more
involved surgery, at 10 to 12 weeks.

I worked for a vet, and neuters are VERY easy to do.

I can't figure WHY a vet, who isn't mentally ill, would say at cat
'can't be neutered' at 7 months.

That's just plain insane, and some of the worst vet advice I've seen in
a very long time.

Rene S.
October 22nd 09, 05:39 PM
> You could show him some research. Google Cornell Veterinary Hospital they
> are pretty respected, and see what they have to say about neutering age.
> Good luck. He is very lucky to have you. Also we love pictures. If you put
> some of him up, do post a link so we can see him. :)

I suggest doing this. I've personally printed out articles online
(from reputable sources, such as Cornell) and showed them to my vet
before.

It's best to get him spayed now. If he starts spraying before he's
neutered, he might not stop even after being neutered. And, of course,
you want to avoid that at all costs!

Please keep us posted!

Netmask[_2_]
October 22nd 09, 10:26 PM
Kathy wrote:
> We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
> approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
> me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
> which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
> negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
> happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
> forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
> 7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
> suggestions?
>
> Kathy


a rule of thumb vets use down her in Oz is when the kitten is 1KG
weight. So I could have had my Burmese done at 3 months but I waited
till he was 4.5 months and his weight was up to 1.5KG.

Some argue you need the hormones in the early growing stage but some
cats are done at 6 weeks without any adverse effects.

Mine still bites a bit but a deep growl from me stops him. (I have a
very deep bass voice)

Kathy
October 23rd 09, 01:23 PM
Rene S. wrote:
>> You could show him some research. Google Cornell Veterinary Hospital they
>> are pretty respected, and see what they have to say about neutering age.
>> Good luck. He is very lucky to have you. Also we love pictures. If you put
>> some of him up, do post a link so we can see him. :)
>
> I suggest doing this. I've personally printed out articles online
> (from reputable sources, such as Cornell) and showed them to my vet
> before.
>
> It's best to get him spayed now. If he starts spraying before he's
> neutered, he might not stop even after being neutered. And, of course,
> you want to avoid that at all costs!
>
> Please keep us posted!

Thanks. I'll look into this.

Kathy

dejablues[_4_]
October 25th 09, 04:20 AM
"Rene S." > wrote in message
...
>
>> You could show him some research. Google Cornell Veterinary Hospital they
>> are pretty respected, and see what they have to say about neutering age.
>> Good luck. He is very lucky to have you. Also we love pictures. If you
>> put
>> some of him up, do post a link so we can see him. :)
>
> I suggest doing this. I've personally printed out articles online
> (from reputable sources, such as Cornell) and showed them to my vet
> before.
>
> It's best to get him spayed now.

Spay = female cat.

Doug Turner
October 27th 09, 03:21 AM
On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 10:42:17 -0400, Kathy > wrote:

>We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
>approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
>me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
>which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
>negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
>happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
>forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
>7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
>suggestions?
>
>Kathy

Neutering may not help. We had a cat who was a holy terror. It got
so bad that my wife and I would fight with each other to see who would
go out of the bedroom first in the morning (because of allergies, he
couldn't sleep with us). His assaults were always playful, but the
bigger he got, the worse it got. "Ow," spraying with water, quiet
time, nothing helped. He never got mean or anything else but stayed
good-natured and just as playful as hell ... and I mean as hell!

After 4 months of this, we had to adopt a couple of cat "orphans" left
homeless when a relative passed away. THE AGGRESSIVE PLAY STOPPED
OVERNIGHT! One orphan cat was a male, and he and our original beast
took off from one end of the house to the other in ecstatic
play-fighting. All noise and posturing and no one got hurt. They
were and still are pals who sleep and eat together and generally share
an indoor life.

The other "orphan," the sister of the male, never participated (and
still holds herself aloof from play-fighting today), but watched with
interest. She adopted the original beast, who (neutered though he
was) followed her around for the first day. When he finally stopped,
she started following him ... and still does chase him down for
cuddling and "spooning".

The original beast, now a stately gentleman of 10 years plus, still
has his moments: if he wants a pet, he'll sit on a strategically
elevated spot and grab your sleeve when you go by, etc., but he's
really just a big teddy bear. My wife and I wonder what we would have
ended up with if we hadn't gotten the other cats ...

So, if you can handle it, try to get him a companion as close in age
as possible, and then sit back and watch the fun. But as other folks
have said, don't wait too long for neutering: I've had brothers and
best of pals become really aggressive - no play, fight to the death
kind of aggressive - when one started maturing, and the relationship
could not be mended.

Kathy
October 27th 09, 02:21 PM
Doug Turner wrote:
> On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 10:42:17 -0400, Kathy > wrote:
>
>> We have a 4-month old kitten who was abandoned at a truck stop. He was
>> approximately 6 weeks old. My son-in-law found him and brought him to
>> me. He had eye infections and an upper respiratory infection, both of
>> which cleared right up with medication. He was given tests (all
>> negative), his shots, and was dewormed. Since then he's healthy and
>> happy and thriving. The only problem is he bites. Just my hands and
>> forearms but it's painful. The vet said he can't be neutered until he's
>> 7 months old. Is it likely that will help with the biting? Any other
>> suggestions?
>>
>> Kathy
>
> Neutering may not help. We had a cat who was a holy terror. It got
> so bad that my wife and I would fight with each other to see who would
> go out of the bedroom first in the morning (because of allergies, he
> couldn't sleep with us). His assaults were always playful, but the
> bigger he got, the worse it got. "Ow," spraying with water, quiet
> time, nothing helped. He never got mean or anything else but stayed
> good-natured and just as playful as hell ... and I mean as hell!
>
> After 4 months of this, we had to adopt a couple of cat "orphans" left
> homeless when a relative passed away. THE AGGRESSIVE PLAY STOPPED
> OVERNIGHT! One orphan cat was a male, and he and our original beast
> took off from one end of the house to the other in ecstatic
> play-fighting. All noise and posturing and no one got hurt. They
> were and still are pals who sleep and eat together and generally share
> an indoor life.
>
> The other "orphan," the sister of the male, never participated (and
> still holds herself aloof from play-fighting today), but watched with
> interest. She adopted the original beast, who (neutered though he
> was) followed her around for the first day. When he finally stopped,
> she started following him ... and still does chase him down for
> cuddling and "spooning".
>
> The original beast, now a stately gentleman of 10 years plus, still
> has his moments: if he wants a pet, he'll sit on a strategically
> elevated spot and grab your sleeve when you go by, etc., but he's
> really just a big teddy bear. My wife and I wonder what we would have
> ended up with if we hadn't gotten the other cats ...
>
> So, if you can handle it, try to get him a companion as close in age
> as possible, and then sit back and watch the fun. But as other folks
> have said, don't wait too long for neutering: I've had brothers and
> best of pals become really aggressive - no play, fight to the death
> kind of aggressive - when one started maturing, and the relationship
> could not be mended.

Thanks for your response. I'm glad that it all worked out ok. My kitty
is not as bad as that. If I didn't pick him up or try to play with him
on my lap, there wouldn't be a problem. He really is an angel and
sleeps on my bed at night. He likes to chase after balls (currently all
7 of them are missing - probably under the stove!), and other active play.

Getting another cat isn't an option. One is all I can handle, both
financially and physically.

Someone suggested hissing at him when he bites (thank you!) and that
seems to be working better than just yelling 'OW!'. We'll see.

Kathy

cybercat
October 27th 09, 02:31 PM
"Kathy" > wrote
>
> Thanks for your response. I'm glad that it all worked out ok. My kitty
> is not as bad as that. If I didn't pick him up or try to play with him on
> my lap, there wouldn't be a problem. He really is an angel and sleeps on
> my bed at night. He likes to chase after balls (currently all 7 of them
> are missing - probably under the stove!), and other active play.
>
> Getting another cat isn't an option. One is all I can handle, both
> financially and physically.
>
> Someone suggested hissing at him when he bites (thank you!) and that seems
> to be working better than just yelling 'OW!'. We'll see.
>
Hissing is a great idea!

cybercat
October 27th 09, 02:37 PM
"Doug Turner" > wrote in message
...

>
> After 4 months of this, we had to adopt a couple of cat "orphans" left
> homeless when a relative passed away. THE AGGRESSIVE PLAY STOPPED
> OVERNIGHT! One orphan cat was a male, and he and our original beast
> took off from one end of the house to the other in ecstatic
> play-fighting. All noise and posturing and no one got hurt. They
> were and still are pals who sleep and eat together and generally share
> an indoor life.
>
> The other "orphan," the sister of the male, never participated (and
> still holds herself aloof from play-fighting today), but watched with
> interest. She adopted the original beast, who (neutered though he
> was) followed her around for the first day. When he finally stopped,
> she started following him ... and still does chase him down for
> cuddling and "spooning".
>
> The original beast, now a stately gentleman of 10 years plus, still
> has his moments: if he wants a pet, he'll sit on a strategically
> elevated spot and grab your sleeve when you go by, etc., but he's
> really just a big teddy bear. My wife and I wonder what we would have
> ended up with if we hadn't gotten the other cats ...
>

Your cats sound adorable.

Rene
October 27th 09, 08:19 PM
> Someone suggested hissing at him when he bites (thank you!) and that
> seems to be working better than just yelling 'OW!'. *We'll see.

Hissing really does work for some cats! I admit I feel sort of odd
doing it though.

cybercat
October 27th 09, 09:05 PM
"Rene" > wrote in message
...

> Someone suggested hissing at him when he bites (thank you!) and that
> seems to be working better than just yelling 'OW!'. We'll see.

>Hissing really does work for some cats! I admit I feel sort of odd
>doing it though.

I think I have mentioned this, but Gracie has this very expressive face--and
once I noticed her looking at me in horror after I had cleaned my glasses
by, you know, blowing on them and then polishing them with my shirt? :) She
thought I was hissing at her.

Kathy
October 27th 09, 10:12 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Kathy" > wrote
>> Thanks for your response. I'm glad that it all worked out ok. My kitty
>> is not as bad as that. If I didn't pick him up or try to play with him on
>> my lap, there wouldn't be a problem. He really is an angel and sleeps on
>> my bed at night. He likes to chase after balls (currently all 7 of them
>> are missing - probably under the stove!), and other active play.
>>
>> Getting another cat isn't an option. One is all I can handle, both
>> financially and physically.
>>
>> Someone suggested hissing at him when he bites (thank you!) and that seems
>> to be working better than just yelling 'OW!'. We'll see.
>>
> Hissing is a great idea!
>
>

He does not like it and seems to fight the urge to bite after I've done it.

Kathy