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View Full Version : OT. What does car insurance cost in the US?


Christina Websell[_2_]
November 9th 09, 06:42 PM
Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it with
what I just paid for my renewal.
Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits too.

Tweed

Adrian[_2_]
November 9th 09, 07:24 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
> our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want
> to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits too.
> Tweed

My insurance is due at the end of January, last year I paid 131.80.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy, Bagheera & Shadow)
Cats leave pawprints on your heart
http://community.webshots.com/user/clowderuk

~*LiveLoveLaugh*~[_2_]
November 9th 09, 07:35 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
> with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
> too.


I pay $85.00/monthly.

--

. )) -::-
. .))
Laurie
((. ..
-::- (( .

*~*LiveLoveLaugh*~*

All that I am or hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.
~Abraham Lincoln


>
> Tweed
>
>
>
>

Pat[_4_]
November 9th 09, 07:53 PM
Dave's bill is for $180/year I believe. That's about what I was paying, too,
when I could afford to drive.

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 9th 09, 07:53 PM
"~*LiveLoveLaugh*~" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>> too.
>
>
> I pay $85.00/monthly.
>
That seems quite a lot.

Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 9th 09, 08:12 PM
"Adrian" > wrote in message
...
> Christina Websell wrote:
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>> our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want
>> to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>> too.
>> Tweed
>
> My insurance is due at the end of January, last year I paid 131.80.

Mine is 199 but I go to and from to work to have cover for that. I seem to
remember that you are not able to work now I might ask you for guidance.

Tweed

MatSav
November 9th 09, 08:59 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in
message ...
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for
> the average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car
> that meets our needs...

460 - for an (almost) 50-year-old driver of a 16-year-old
2-litre Volvo Estate that's done over 215,000 miles. Social,
domestic and pleasure useIncludes business use (for no extra
premium), car kept off road overnight, in a slightly higher than
average "crime postcode".

As I'm on a medically restricted licence, some insurers (like
Direct Line, More Than, &c - all the "big box" shifters) refuse
to quote for the risk. That's how they keep relatively low
premiums - they don't take any proposal that has abnormally high
risk.

--
MatSav

Adrian[_2_]
November 9th 09, 09:09 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> "Adrian" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>> our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want
>>> to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and
>>> Brits too.
>>> Tweed
>>
>> My insurance is due at the end of January, last year I paid 131.80.
>
> Mine is 199 but I go to and from to work to have cover for that. I
> seem to remember that you are not able to work now I might ask you
> for guidance.
> Tweed

I got widely varying quotes, I got my insurance from Saga and the quote from
confused.com
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy, Bagheera & Shadow)
Cats leave pawprints on your heart
http://community.webshots.com/user/clowderuk

Matthew[_3_]
November 9th 09, 09:25 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
> with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
> too.
>
> Tweed
>
>
>

I have full coverage on my 2007 F 150
no deductible
max full rental car coverage of 45 days
tow coverage up to 250 miles
uninsured motorist
PIP and Body liability 100/300 maxed out
Also stacked insurance up to 4 times coverage so that means I am covered up
to a million dollars for every accident I cause
I pay $59.60 a month pay six months in advance it is $325

might be more to have stacked but in Florida it is worth it

Yowie
November 9th 09, 09:32 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message

> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
> our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want
> to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits too.

In Australia it depends on alot of things:.

1) The type of insurance you are seeking: do you want compulsorary third
party, third party property ('bomb insurance'), or comprehensive?

2) The age & gender of the drivers. For every year you are under 30 (even if
29 years and 364 days) it will cost more. If you are over 55, you get a
discount. If you,the main driver, is over 30, but might have tenagers
driving the car on more than (IIRC) 12 occasions in a year, then it will
cost more - but not as much as if it was the teenager trying to get
insurance. Women tend to pay slightly less than men (we have more accidents,
but said accidents are usually minor scratches and dings that barely make it
past the excess value)

3) Your licence type: if you are on a restricted licence (learner, P1 or P2)
or have restricted licence driving the car more than 12 times a year, it
will cost more again.

3) Age, type and value of vehicle (for example, a $25,000 ferrari is going
to cost more to insure than a $25,000 camry, and for a ferrari you might
need a specialist insurer rather than a regular one)

4) Where the car lives at night (highly dependant on the suburb you live in,
*especially* for comprehensive)

5) Your insurance history - both in terms of whether you've made any claims
in the last 5 years and whether you're entitled to a 'loyalty bonus' for
sticking with the same insurance company for a few years.

6) How much excess you are willing to pay. Not always available from every
insurer, but some are willing to decrease the cost if you are willing to pay
more excess.

For my car (a recent Camry sedan) with my details the on-line quote was:

Compulsorary:
CTP Greenslip: $351.82

Optional:
Third party property only (aka 'bomb insurance'): $293.81 ($500 excess,
$1200 excess for drivers under 25, $900 excess for drivers under 30)
Comprehensive (includes third party property), no extra windshield or hire
car options: $638.45 with a standard $600 excess, and an excess of $1,600 if
driven by a driver under the age of $25.

Information from www.nrma.com.au.

Yowie
--
If you're paddling upstream in a canoe and a wheel falls off, how many
pancakes can you fit in a doghouse? None, icecream doesn't have bones.

Sherry
November 9th 09, 10:11 PM
On Nov 9, 12:42*pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car *but for the average
> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? *I just want to compare it with
> what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, *I'd like to hear from Europeans and *Brits too.
>
> Tweed

It is a worthless comparison unless you know the specifics of various
policies. Even
though we're not teenagers, there are a lot of variables.
1. Is your policy for liability only (required by law here). How much
liability do you carry?
I think the minimum now is 25/50/25, but you can buy as much coverage
as you like.
2. Or, does your policy cover comprehensive/collision too?
3. How many cars are covered? Most companies have multi-car
discounts.
4. Do you live in a large city? Rates are higher than a rural area.
5. How's your credit? As unfair as it is, your credit rating dictates
your premium.
6. Are you an accident-free, and ticket-free driver? Rates are lower
for you.
7. How about add-ons? You can add roadside assistance, rental car in
case of
accident, and medical coverage for yourself in case of injury.

There's a lot more that don't come to mind right now, and I'm starting
to sound like
that cute little tart on the TV commercials.

Sherry

November 9th 09, 10:36 PM
Sherry wrote:

> 7. How about add-ons? You can add roadside assistance, rental car in
> case of
> accident, and medical coverage for yourself in case of injury.

> There's a lot more that don't come to mind right now, and I'm starting
> to sound like that cute little tart on the TV commercials.

There's only one? :) You mean the cartoons, right? One has pink hair and
the other is blonde. I can't remember which goes with which company, but
I do remember that one of them is Progressive, which is my auto insurance
company.

As they go, Progressive is pretty decent. They insured me at a time when
I was broke and had been canceled by my previous company due to chronic
late payments, and I couldn't find any ins. company to take me. Progressive
charged me more, of course, but it wasn't exorbitant. WHen I had an accident
a few years back, they fought hard for me when the jerk in the other car
lied through his teeth about what happened. Meanwhile, although my car
was severely damaged, they didn't total it, and I got a free loaner car
and rides to and from the auto rental place. They treated me well!

Now I'm starting to sound like a commercial. :)

Joyce


--
As an atheist, I believe that all life is unspeakably precious, because
it's only here for a brief moment, a flare against the dark, and then it's
gone forever. No afterlives, no second chances. So there can be nothing
crueler than the abuse, destruction or wanton taking of a life.
-- J. Michael Straczynski

William Hamblen[_2_]
November 9th 09, 10:44 PM
On Mon, 9 Nov 2009 14:11:08 -0800 (PST), Sherry >
wrote:

>On Nov 9, 12:42*pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car *but for the average
>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? *I just want to compare it with
>> what I just paid for my renewal.
>> Thinking about it further, *I'd like to hear from Europeans and *Brits too.
>>
>> Tweed
>
>It is a worthless comparison unless you know the specifics of various
>policies. Even
>though we're not teenagers, there are a lot of variables.
>1. Is your policy for liability only (required by law here). How much
>liability do you carry?
>I think the minimum now is 25/50/25, but you can buy as much coverage
>as you like.
>2. Or, does your policy cover comprehensive/collision too?
>3. How many cars are covered? Most companies have multi-car
>discounts.
>4. Do you live in a large city? Rates are higher than a rural area.
>5. How's your credit? As unfair as it is, your credit rating dictates
>your premium.
>6. Are you an accident-free, and ticket-free driver? Rates are lower
>for you.
>7. How about add-ons? You can add roadside assistance, rental car in
>case of
>accident, and medical coverage for yourself in case of injury.
>
>There's a lot more that don't come to mind right now, and I'm starting
>to sound like
>that cute little tart on the TV commercials.

Because automobile insurance is regulated by the states in the US and
not by the federal government you get at least 50 different answers.

Bud

Jofirey
November 9th 09, 10:55 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in
message ...
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that
> meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to
> compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and
> Brits too.
>
> Tweed
>
>

For just liability insurance, nothing that would fix his own car if
he wrecked it, my twenty year old grandson pays about $50 a month.
Charlie and I for the two of us for full coverage on two cars with a
low deductable it costs about $100 a month.

Jo
>
>

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
November 10th 09, 02:24 AM
Christina Websell wrote:
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it with
> what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits too.
>
> Tweed
>
In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live!
Also upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
people use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor,
too - how many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how
many accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
complicated.
>
>
>

jmcquown[_2_]
November 10th 09, 02:49 AM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
m...
>
>
> Christina Websell wrote:
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>> too.
>>
>> Tweed
>>
> In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live! Also
> upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many people
> use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor, too - how
> many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how many
> accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
> complicated.
>>

Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability coverage,
uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an accident.
There are a lot of factors.

Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a discount.
I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.

Jill

Jane
November 10th 09, 11:37 AM
On Nov 9, 9:49*pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
>
> m...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Christina Websell wrote:
> >> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car *but for the average
> >> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs..
> >> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? *I just want to compare it
> >> with what I just paid for my renewal.
> >> Thinking about it further, *I'd like to hear from Europeans and *Brits
> >> too.
>
> >> Tweed
>
> > In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live! Also
> > upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many people
> > use your car (and their ages). *Your driving record is a factor, too - how
> > many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how many
> > accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
> > complicated.
>
> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability coverage,
> uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an accident..
> There are a lot of factors.
>
> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a discount..
> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
> dependents). *I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>
> Jill- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I pay just under $100 a month to Allstate, but I'm thoroughly covered
for almost
any problem (it's new-car coverage and I never dropped it). I have a
really high
deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.

Jane

~*LiveLoveLaugh*~[_2_]
November 10th 09, 12:00 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "~*LiveLoveLaugh*~" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our
>>> needs.
>>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>> too.
>>
>>
>> I pay $85.00/monthly.
>>
> That seems quite a lot.

New car that has the name "sport coupe" in it, so that's one reason it's
high. I also have the very best coverage, no deductable, and car rental
insurance as well. Then add on that I live in the state of NY!!

--

. )) -::-
. .))
Laurie
((. ..
-::- (( .

*~*LiveLoveLaugh*~*

All that I am or hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.
~Abraham Lincoln


>
> Tweed
>
>
>
>
>

~*LiveLoveLaugh*~[_2_]
November 10th 09, 12:13 PM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
> m...
>>
>>
>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our
>>> needs.
>>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>> too.
>>>
>>> Tweed
>>>
>> In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live! Also
>> upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
>> people use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor,
>> too - how many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how
>> many accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
>> complicated.
>>>
>
> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability
> coverage, uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an
> accident. There are a lot of factors.
>
> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a discount.
> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
> dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.

Jill,

I have USAA too. That's b/c my ex was a Naval pilot. I was surprised that
USAA would carry me after our divorce. I also forgot to mention when I
replied to Tweed that my coverage also has home owner's, as well.
($85.00/mo.)

--

. )) -::-
. .))
Laurie
((. ..
-::- (( .

*~*LiveLoveLaugh*~*

All that I am or hope to be, I owe to my angel mother.
~Abraham Lincoln

>
> Jill

wafflycat[_2_]
November 10th 09, 03:32 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
> with what I just paid for my renewal.
> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
> too.
>
> Tweed
>
>
>

It very much depends upon car, mileage, use class, driving history, age,
gender, number of years no claims bonus you have, is it protected or not...
there is no such thing as the average sensible adult when it comes to
insurance. And it is also affected by what your insurance provides in terms
of cover, such as roadside assistance, courtesy car, legal help etc. and
also whether a given insurance company wants your business or not. So it is
very difficult to work out who that 'average sensible adult is'. Not being
picky here, but having worked in the insurance business for many years, it
is not simple.

Me - fully comp, protected, small Mercedes, social, business (class one),
domestic etc., company director, middle-aged woman, paid just over 200pa

jmcquown[_2_]
November 11th 09, 02:00 PM
"~*LiveLoveLaugh*~" > wrote in message
...
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
>> m...
>>>
>>>
>>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>>> our needs.
>>>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>>> too.
>>>>
>>>> Tweed
>>>>
>>> In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live!
>>> Also upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
>>> people use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor,
>>> too - how many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how
>>> many accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
>>> complicated.
>>>>
>>
>> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
>> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability
>> coverage, uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in
>> an accident. There are a lot of factors.
>>
>> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a
>> discount. I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and
>> their dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and
>> medical) and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>
> Jill,
>
> I have USAA too. That's b/c my ex was a Naval pilot. I was surprised
> that USAA would carry me after our divorce. I also forgot to mention when
> I replied to Tweed that my coverage also has home owner's, as well.
> ($85.00/mo.)
>
> --
>
> . )) -::-
> . .))
> Laurie
> ((. ..
> -::- (( .
>

>
Once a dependent, always a dependent ;) USAA recently expanded their
membership offering to include *any* honorably discharged veteran and their
dependents. A few years ago John (who was honorably discharged from the
Army but it was years ago) inquired and they said no, if he hadn't become a
member within three years of his detachment he wasn't qualified. They've
just changed that.

Jill

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 09:00 PM
"Adrian" > wrote in message
...
> Christina Websell wrote:
>> "Adrian" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>>> our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want
>>>> to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and
>>>> Brits too.
>>>> Tweed
>>>
>>> My insurance is due at the end of January, last year I paid 131.80.
>>
>> Mine is 199 but I go to and from to work to have cover for that. I
>> seem to remember that you are not able to work now I might ask you
>> for guidance.
>> Tweed
>
> I got widely varying quotes, I got my insurance from Saga and the quote
> from confused.com
> --
Have you ever claimed from Saga? I have a friend who insured her car with
Saga and they were very difficult about paying out for a genuine claim.

Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 09:04 PM
"~*LiveLoveLaugh*~" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "~*LiveLoveLaugh*~" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>>> our needs.
>>>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>>> too.
>>>
>>>
>>> I pay $85.00/monthly.
>>>
>> That seems quite a lot.
>
> New car that has the name "sport coupe" in it, so that's one reason it's
> high. I also have the very best coverage, no deductable, and car rental
> insurance as well. Then add on that I live in the state of NY!!
>
Oh, well, I guess 85 dollars/month is quite lucky then ;-)

Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 09:35 PM
"MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot | com> wrote
in message ...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs...
>
> 460 - for an (almost) 50-year-old driver of a 16-year-old 2-litre Volvo
> Estate that's done over 215,000 miles. Social, domestic and pleasure
> useIncludes business use (for no extra premium), car kept off road
> overnight, in a slightly higher than average "crime postcode".
>
> As I'm on a medically restricted licence, some insurers (like Direct Line,
> More Than, &c - all the "big box" shifters) refuse to quote for the risk.
> That's how they keep relatively low premiums - they don't take any
> proposal that has abnormally high risk.

ISTR that you have epilepsy? which even if well controlled freaks out car
insurers. Did I remember this right? If so you are lucky to get insurance
at all and grab that 460 quid premium.
I don't think your premium is based on what your car is worth but what you
are likely to do to others if you smash into a BMW convertible and what your
insurance company might have to pay if you do.
Consider finding yourself a broker. Mine knows every insurance company
known to man, gets me the best deal and if I ever have an accident he deals
with it for me. OK it costs me an extra 20 quid a year, it's well worth it.
He's never suggested Direct Line or More Than.


Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 09:46 PM
"William Hamblen" > wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 9 Nov 2009 14:11:08 -0800 (PST), Sherry >
> wrote:
>
>>On Nov 9, 12:42 pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
>>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
>>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>> with
>>> what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>> too.
>>>
>>> Tweed
>>
>>It is a worthless comparison unless you know the specifics of various
>>policies. Even
>>though we're not teenagers, there are a lot of variables.
>>1. Is your policy for liability only (required by law here). How much
>>liability do you carry?
>>I think the minimum now is 25/50/25, but you can buy as much coverage
>>as you like.
>>2. Or, does your policy cover comprehensive/collision too?
>>3. How many cars are covered? Most companies have multi-car
>>discounts.
>>4. Do you live in a large city? Rates are higher than a rural area.
>>5. How's your credit? As unfair as it is, your credit rating dictates
>>your premium.
>>6. Are you an accident-free, and ticket-free driver? Rates are lower
>>for you.
>>7. How about add-ons? You can add roadside assistance, rental car in
>>case of
>>accident, and medical coverage for yourself in case of injury.
>>
>>There's a lot more that don't come to mind right now, and I'm starting
>>to sound like
>>that cute little tart on the TV commercials.
>
> Because automobile insurance is regulated by the states in the US and
> not by the federal government you get at least 50 different answers.
>
I hadn't thought about that.

Tweed

Adrian[_2_]
November 11th 09, 10:38 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> "Adrian" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>> "Adrian" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Christina Websell wrote:
>>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that
>>>>> meets our needs. Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I
>>>>> just want to compare it with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>>>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and
>>>>> Brits too.
>>>>> Tweed
>>>>
>>>> My insurance is due at the end of January, last year I paid
>>>> 131.80.
>>>
>>> Mine is 199 but I go to and from to work to have cover for that. I
>>> seem to remember that you are not able to work now I might ask you
>>> for guidance.
>>> Tweed
>>
>> I got widely varying quotes, I got my insurance from Saga and the
>> quote from confused.com
>> --
> Have you ever claimed from Saga? I have a friend who insured her car
> with Saga and they were very difficult about paying out for a genuine
> claim.
> Tweed

Fortunately I've never had to claim off my insurance.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy, Bagheera & Shadow)
Cats leave pawprints on your heart
http://community.webshots.com/user/clowderuk

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 10:45 PM
"Jane" > wrote in message
...
On Nov 9, 9:49 pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
>
> m...
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Christina Websell wrote:
> >> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
> >> average
> >> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
> >> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
> >> with what I just paid for my renewal.
> >> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
> >> too.
>
> >> Tweed
>
> > In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live!
> > Also
> > upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
> > people
> > use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor, too -
> > how
> > many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how many
> > accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
> > complicated.
>
> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability
> coverage,
> uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an accident.
> There are a lot of factors.
>
> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a discount.
> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
> dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>
> Jill- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I pay just under $100 a month to Allstate, but I'm thoroughly covered
for almost
any problem (it's new-car coverage and I never dropped it). I have a
really high
deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.

-------

What is renter's insurance?

Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 11th 09, 11:11 PM
"wafflycat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the average
>> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our needs.
>> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>> too.
>>
>> Tweed
>>
>>
>>
>
> It very much depends upon car, mileage, use class, driving history, age,
> gender, number of years no claims bonus you have, is it protected or
> not... there is no such thing as the average sensible adult when it comes
> to insurance. And it is also affected by what your insurance provides in
> terms of cover, such as roadside assistance, courtesy car, legal help etc.
> and also whether a given insurance company wants your business or not. So
> it is very difficult to work out who that 'average sensible adult is'. Not
> being picky here, but having worked in the insurance business for many
> years, it is not simple.
>
> Me - fully comp, protected, small Mercedes, social, business (class one),
> domestic etc., company director, middle-aged woman, paid just over 200pa
Identical to you in lots of ways, fully comp, protected Small Citroen, 8
years no claim bonus.
199. work and domestic.

Tweed

jmcquown[_2_]
November 12th 09, 01:08 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Jane" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Nov 9, 9:49 pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
>>
>> m...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > Christina Websell wrote:
>> >> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>> >> average
>> >> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our
>> >> needs.
>> >> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>> >> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>> >> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>> >> too.
>>
>> >> Tweed
>>
>> > In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live!
>> > Also
>> > upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
>> > people
>> > use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor, too -
>> > how
>> > many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how many
>> > accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
>> > complicated.
>>
>> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
>> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability
>> coverage,
>> uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an
>> accident.
>> There are a lot of factors.
>>
>> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a
>> discount.
>> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
>> dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
>> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>>
>> Jill- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> I pay just under $100 a month to Allstate, but I'm thoroughly covered
> for almost
> any problem (it's new-car coverage and I never dropped it). I have a
> really high
> deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.
>
> -------
>
> What is renter's insurance?
>
> Tweed
>
>

If you rent/lease a flat (apartment) you can (should) purchase renters
insurance to cover all of your personal belongings in case of a fire,
burglary, plumbing mishap or even a natural disaster (that coverage is
usually extra... I had an earthquake rider when I lived on the New Madrid
fault in Tennessee). The owner of the property is supposed to carry
insurance to cover the actual structure, but your personal belongings are
your own problem.

Jill

Jofirey
November 12th 09, 02:16 AM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in
> message ...
>>
>> "Jane" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> On Nov 9, 9:49 pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
>>> message
>>>
>>> m...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> > Christina Websell wrote:
>>> >> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for
>>> >> the average
>>> >> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>> >> our needs.
>>> >> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to
>>> >> compare it
>>> >> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> >> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans
>>> >> and Brits
>>> >> too.
>>>
>>> >> Tweed
>>>
>>> > In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you
>>> > live! Also
>>> > upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how
>>> > many people
>>> > use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a
>>> > factor, too - how
>>> > many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how
>>> > many
>>> > accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be
>>> > very
>>> > complicated.
>>>
>>> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the
>>> lower the
>>> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple
>>> liability coverage,
>>> uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an
>>> accident.
>>> There are a lot of factors.
>>>
>>> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a
>>> discount.
>>> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and
>>> their
>>> dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and
>>> medical)
>>> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>>>
>>> Jill- Hide quoted text -
>>>
>>> - Show quoted text -
>>
>> I pay just under $100 a month to Allstate, but I'm thoroughly
>> covered
>> for almost
>> any problem (it's new-car coverage and I never dropped it). I
>> have a
>> really high
>> deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.
>>
>> -------
>>
>> What is renter's insurance?
>>
>> Tweed
>>
>>
>
> If you rent/lease a flat (apartment) you can (should) purchase
> renters insurance to cover all of your personal belongings in case
> of a fire, burglary, plumbing mishap or even a natural disaster
> (that coverage is usually extra... I had an earthquake rider when
> I lived on the New Madrid fault in Tennessee). The owner of the
> property is supposed to carry insurance to cover the actual
> structure, but your personal belongings are your own problem.
>
> Jill

I had an office in an apartment building at one time. Another
'small' incidental that renter's insurance should cover is if you
accidently cause a problem such as starting a fire that causes
damage to the building or other tenants.

Jo

MatSav
November 12th 09, 08:07 AM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote
>> ...
>> What is renter's insurance?
>>
>> Tweed
>>
>>
>
> If you rent/lease a flat (apartment) you can (should) purchase
> renters insurance to cover all of your personal belongings in
> case of a fire, burglary, plumbing mishap or even a natural
> disaster...

Ah, OK. In the UK we call that "Contents insurance", but it's not
only tenants and leaseholders who buy the product - it's
available to freeholders (owners) as well, as a separate
insurance from the structural "Buildings insurance".

--
MatSav

MatSav
November 12th 09, 08:43 AM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in
message ...
>
> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot
> | com> wrote in message
> ...
>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in
>> message ...
>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for
>>> the average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car
>>> that meets our needs...
>>
>> 460 - for an (almost) 50-year-old driver of a 16-year-old
>> 2-litre Volvo Estate that's done over 215,000 miles. Social,
>> domestic and pleasure useIncludes business use (for no extra
>> premium), car kept off road overnight, in a slightly higher
>> than average "crime postcode".
>>
>> As I'm on a medically restricted licence, some insurers (like
>> Direct Line, More Than, &c - all the "big box" shifters)
>> refuse to quote for the risk. That's how they keep relatively
>> low premiums - they don't take any proposal that has
>> abnormally high risk.
>
> ISTR that you have epilepsy? which even if well controlled
> freaks out car insurers. Did I remember this right?

Indeed, you have.

> If so you are lucky to get insurance at all and grab that 460
> quid premium.

I know, I know! However, I don't think the premium is heavily
loaded because of the epilepsy. I understand a legal challenge
using the Disability Discrimination Act put an end to that - but
it's also a reason why so many insurers decline to accept a
proposal. My last insurer raised their premium from 390 to
almost 700 - they didn't get my business!

> I don't think your premium is based on what your car is worth
> but what you are likely to do to others if you smash into a BMW
> convertible and what your insurance company might have to pay
> if you do.

In the UK, vehicles are assigned to a Group, between 1 and 21
(lowest to highest risk). Mine's a Group 16 car. (I forgot, it's
2-litre *turbo*, 165 BHP - and I've also got maximum NCB). The
vehicle's value is only a factor if it's very valuable (over
23k), according to my broker. Other factors do affect the
premium though. I changed my "occupation" from "Technical
Manager" to "Civil Servant", although I haven't actually changed
my job, and saved over 100 on the original quote!

> Consider finding yourself a broker. Mine knows every insurance
> company known to man, gets me the best deal and if I ever have
> an accident he deals with it for me. OK it costs me an extra
> 20 quid a year, it's well worth it. He's never suggested Direct
> Line or More Than..
>

I use a broker - a family friend for more than 25 years. He was a
friend long before he became a broker! He got me insured after I
had my licence re-issued after a one-year suspension following a
seizure. My previous insurer wouldn't re-insure me :-(

--
MatSav

William Hamblen[_2_]
November 12th 09, 01:47 PM
On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 08:07:58 -0000, "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage |
at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot | com> wrote:

>"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
>> "Christina Websell" > wrote
>>> ...
>>> What is renter's insurance?
>>>
>>> Tweed
>>>
>>>
>>
>> If you rent/lease a flat (apartment) you can (should) purchase
>> renters insurance to cover all of your personal belongings in
>> case of a fire, burglary, plumbing mishap or even a natural
>> disaster...
>
>Ah, OK. In the UK we call that "Contents insurance", but it's not
>only tenants and leaseholders who buy the product - it's
>available to freeholders (owners) as well, as a separate
>insurance from the structural "Buildings insurance".

The building and contents usually are insured under one policy in the
US. In a homeowner's policy there is coverage for the physical damage
to the building, contents and "appurtenant structures" (i.e., the
garden shed) and legal liability. The contents and appurtenant
structures are automatically insured to a percentage of the coverage
on the dwelling. The amount of coverage on contents and other
buildings can be changed when needed.

Bud

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
November 12th 09, 06:36 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> "Jane" > wrote in message
> deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.
>
> -------
>
> What is renter's insurance?
>
> Tweed

Essentially "homeowner's" insurance for people who rent their dwellings.
It covers your personal belongings and insures you against
liability for guests or workers who are injured on your premises. Mine
costs me about $265 a year, because I never changed the "replacement"
value set up when I had several more roomsfull of furniture (including
the piano I sold when I moved from a house to an apartment, while I
still lived in California). I keep meaning to get a new estimate from
my agent, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
November 12th 09, 06:37 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> "Jane" > wrote in message
> deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.
>
> -------
>
> What is renter's insurance?
>
> Tweed

Essentially "homeowner's" insurance for people who rent their dwellings.
It covers your personal belongings and insures you against
liability for guests or workers who are injured on your premises. Mine
costs me about $265 a year, because I never changed the "replacement"
value set up when I had several more roomsfull of furniture (including
the piano I sold when I moved from a house to an apartment, while I
still lived in California). I keep meaning to get a new estimate from
my agent, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 12th 09, 07:19 PM
"MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot | com> wrote
in message ...
>
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot | com>
>> wrote in message ...
>>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets
>>>> our needs...
>>>
>>> 460 - for an (almost) 50-year-old driver of a 16-year-old 2-litre Volvo
>>> Estate that's done over 215,000 miles. Social, domestic and pleasure
>>> useIncludes business use (for no extra premium), car kept off road
>>> overnight, in a slightly higher than average "crime postcode".
>>>
>>> As I'm on a medically restricted licence, some insurers (like Direct
>>> Line, More Than, &c - all the "big box" shifters) refuse to quote for
>>> the risk. That's how they keep relatively low premiums - they don't take
>>> any proposal that has abnormally high risk.
>>
>> ISTR that you have epilepsy? which even if well controlled freaks out
>> car insurers. Did I remember this right?
>
> Indeed, you have.
>
>> If so you are lucky to get insurance at all and grab that 460 quid
>> premium.
>
> I know, I know! However, I don't think the premium is heavily loaded
> because of the epilepsy. I understand a legal challenge using the
> Disability Discrimination Act put an end to that - but it's also a reason
> why so many insurers decline to accept a proposal. My last insurer raised
> their premium from 390 to almost 700 - they didn't get my business!
>
>> I don't think your premium is based on what your car is worth but what
>> you are likely to do to others if you smash into a BMW convertible and
>> what your insurance company might have to pay if you do.
>
> In the UK, vehicles are assigned to a Group, between 1 and 21 (lowest to
> highest risk). Mine's a Group 16 car. (I forgot, it's 2-litre *turbo*, 165
> BHP - and I've also got maximum NCB). The vehicle's value is only a factor
> if it's very valuable (over 23k), according to my broker. Other factors
> do affect the premium though. I changed my "occupation" from "Technical
> Manager" to "Civil Servant", although I haven't actually changed my job,
> and saved over 100 on the original quote!
>

Well, if you drive a car like that, it's your own fault that your insurance
is high!
I drive a small car (Citroen) - I think it's Group 3. 0-60 in 10 minutes
<joke> but it's sufficient for my needs.
It gets me to work, to the shops and the boot is big enough to get 3/4 cwt
of chicken food in, plus a bale of straw if I collapse the back seats. What
more could I want?
I hesitate to get a newer car. I would dread it if I scratched it.
For now my P reg car suits me just fine. It's very reliable and if I
reverse round a tree (I do a lot of that) it's not that important if a
branch scratches my car- which is not to say my car is covered with
scratches, it isn't. I know how to avoid damaging my car, but if I did it
wouldn't be the end of the world.

Tweed

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 12th 09, 07:22 PM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Jane" > wrote in message
>> ...
>> On Nov 9, 9:49 pm, "jmcquown" > wrote:
>>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
>>>
>>> m...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> > Christina Websell wrote:
>>> >> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>> >> average
>>> >> sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that meets our
>>> >> needs.
>>> >> Would you all mind telling me what you pay? I just want to compare it
>>> >> with what I just paid for my renewal.
>>> >> Thinking about it further, I'd like to hear from Europeans and Brits
>>> >> too.
>>>
>>> >> Tweed
>>>
>>> > In the U.S., it depends upon many factors, including where you live!
>>> > Also
>>> > upon how far you drive on a regular basis - to work, etc., how many
>>> > people
>>> > use your car (and their ages). Your driving record is a factor, too -
>>> > how
>>> > many traffic citations you've received in a given period, how many
>>> > accidents you've had (whether your fault or not).... it can be very
>>> > complicated.
>>>
>>> Also what deductible you choose (the higher the deductible the lower the
>>> premium), whether you want collision rather than simple liability
>>> coverage,
>>> uninsured motorist, medical coverage if someone is injured in an
>>> accident.
>>> There are a lot of factors.
>>>
>>> Mine is bundled with my homeowners insurance so I get a bit of a
>>> discount.
>>> I'm covered by USAA (available only to military personnel and their
>>> dependents). I have full coverage (liability, collision, UI and medical)
>>> and pay about $40 a month with a $500 deductible.
>>>
>>> Jill- Hide quoted text -
>>>
>>> - Show quoted text -
>>
>> I pay just under $100 a month to Allstate, but I'm thoroughly covered
>> for almost
>> any problem (it's new-car coverage and I never dropped it). I have a
>> really high
>> deductible and a discount because I also have renter's insurance.
>>
>> -------
>>
>> What is renter's insurance?
>>
>> Tweed
>>
>>
>
> If you rent/lease a flat (apartment) you can (should) purchase renters
> insurance to cover all of your personal belongings in case of a fire,
> burglary, plumbing mishap or even a natural disaster (that coverage is
> usually extra... I had an earthquake rider when I lived on the New Madrid
> fault in Tennessee). The owner of the property is supposed to carry
> insurance to cover the actual structure, but your personal belongings are
> your own problem.
>
Thanks for the explanation.

Tweed


>

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 12th 09, 07:31 PM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Christina Websell wrote:
>> "Jane" > wrote in message deductible and a discount
>> because I also have renter's insurance.
>>
>> -------
>>
>> What is renter's insurance?
>>
>> Tweed
>
> Essentially "homeowner's" insurance for people who rent their dwellings.
> It covers your personal belongings and insures you against
> liability for guests or workers who are injured on your premises. Mine
> costs me about $265 a year, because I never changed the "replacement"
> value set up when I had several more roomsfull of furniture (including
> the piano I sold when I moved from a house to an apartment, while I
> still lived in California). I keep meaning to get a new estimate from
> my agent, but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Maybe you should, might save you some money.

Tweed

Adrian[_2_]
November 12th 09, 09:07 PM
Christina Websell wrote:
> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot |
> com> wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot |
>>> com> wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> "Christina Websell" > wrote in
>>>> message ...
>>>>> Not for a teenager rushing around a high-powered car but for the
>>>>> average sensible adult like we all are on here with a car that
>>>>> meets our needs...
>>>>
>>>> 460 - for an (almost) 50-year-old driver of a 16-year-old 2-litre
>>>> Volvo Estate that's done over 215,000 miles. Social, domestic and
>>>> pleasure useIncludes business use (for no extra premium), car kept
>>>> off road overnight, in a slightly higher than average "crime
>>>> postcode". As I'm on a medically restricted licence, some insurers
>>>> (like
>>>> Direct Line, More Than, &c - all the "big box" shifters) refuse to
>>>> quote for the risk. That's how they keep relatively low premiums -
>>>> they don't take any proposal that has abnormally high risk.
>>>
>>> ISTR that you have epilepsy? which even if well controlled freaks
>>> out car insurers. Did I remember this right?
>>
>> Indeed, you have.
>>
>>> If so you are lucky to get insurance at all and grab that 460 quid
>>> premium.
>>
>> I know, I know! However, I don't think the premium is heavily loaded
>> because of the epilepsy. I understand a legal challenge using the
>> Disability Discrimination Act put an end to that - but it's also a
>> reason why so many insurers decline to accept a proposal. My last
>> insurer raised their premium from 390 to almost 700 - they didn't
>> get my business!
>>> I don't think your premium is based on what your car is worth but
>>> what you are likely to do to others if you smash into a BMW
>>> convertible and what your insurance company might have to pay if
>>> you do.
>>
>> In the UK, vehicles are assigned to a Group, between 1 and 21
>> (lowest to highest risk). Mine's a Group 16 car. (I forgot, it's
>> 2-litre *turbo*, 165 BHP - and I've also got maximum NCB). The
>> vehicle's value is only a factor if it's very valuable (over 23k),
>> according to my broker. Other factors do affect the premium though.
>> I changed my "occupation" from "Technical Manager" to "Civil
>> Servant", although I haven't actually changed my job, and saved over
>> 100 on the original quote!
>
> Well, if you drive a car like that, it's your own fault that your
> insurance is high!
> I drive a small car (Citroen) - I think it's Group 3. 0-60 in 10
> minutes <joke> but it's sufficient for my needs.
> It gets me to work, to the shops and the boot is big enough to get
> 3/4 cwt of chicken food in, plus a bale of straw if I collapse the
> back seats. What more could I want?
> I hesitate to get a newer car. I would dread it if I scratched it.
> For now my P reg car suits me just fine. It's very reliable and if I
> reverse round a tree (I do a lot of that) it's not that important if a
> branch scratches my car- which is not to say my car is covered with
> scratches, it isn't. I know how to avoid damaging my car, but if I
> did it wouldn't be the end of the world.
>
> Tweed

Mine's a P reg Escort, worth next to nothing, hence the cheaper insurance.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy, Bagheera & Shadow)
Cats leave pawprints on your heart
http://community.webshots.com/user/clowderuk

MatSav
November 13th 09, 07:35 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in
message ...
>
> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot
> | com> wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> ...
>> In the UK, vehicles are assigned to a Group, between 1 and 21
>> (lowest to highest risk). Mine's a Group 16 car. (I forgot,
>> it's 2-litre *turbo*, 165 BHP ...
>
> Well, if you drive a car like that, it's your own fault that
> your insurance is high!

I like safety - or at least a perception thereof. In the
unfortunate event of a head-on collision, with a large car like a
Volvo, the engine won't end up in my lap - plus I use the load
carrying capacity very often for my activities (such as canoeing)
with a local Scout Troop. I also learnt to drive in a big heavy
car - a Morris Oxford!

--
MatSav

Cheryl[_5_]
November 13th 09, 07:56 PM
MatSav wrote:
> "Christina Websell" > wrote in
> message ...
>> "MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot
>> | com> wrote in message
>> ...
>>> ...
>>> In the UK, vehicles are assigned to a Group, between 1 and 21
>>> (lowest to highest risk). Mine's a Group 16 car. (I forgot,
>>> it's 2-litre *turbo*, 165 BHP ...
>> Well, if you drive a car like that, it's your own fault that
>> your insurance is high!
>
> I like safety - or at least a perception thereof. In the
> unfortunate event of a head-on collision, with a large car like a
> Volvo, the engine won't end up in my lap - plus I use the load
> carrying capacity very often for my activities (such as canoeing)
> with a local Scout Troop. I also learnt to drive in a big heavy
> car - a Morris Oxford!
>

I heard of someone who was working in my old home town, which is located
in a fairly isolated area. After surviving a collision with a moose
(common enough in this part of the world in far less rural areas) he
replaced his car with the heaviest and biggest one he could manage - for
safety reasons!

Some people need sturdy cars.

--
Cheryl

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 14th 09, 08:59 PM
"Adrian" > wrote in message
om...
>>>> Indeed, you have.
>>>
>>>> If so you are lucky to get insurance at all and grab that 460 quid
>>>> premium.
>>>
>>
>> Well, if you drive a car like that, it's your own fault that your
>> insurance is high!
>> I drive a small car (Citroen) - I think it's Group 3. 0-60 in 10
>> minutes <joke> but it's sufficient for my needs.
>> It gets me to work, to the shops and the boot is big enough to get
>> 3/4 cwt of chicken food in, plus a bale of straw if I collapse the
>> back seats. What more could I want?
>> I hesitate to get a newer car. I would dread it if I scratched it.
>> For now my P reg car suits me just fine. It's very reliable and if I
>> reverse round a tree (I do a lot of that) it's not that important if a
>> branch scratches my car- which is not to say my car is covered with
>> scratches, it isn't. I know how to avoid damaging my car, but if I
>> did it wouldn't be the end of the world.
>>
>> Tweed
>
> Mine's a P reg Escort, worth next to nothing, hence the cheaper insurance.

I suppose I should get a better car, but why? I have a good mechanic who
keeps it well serviced and it's mega-reliable. I'd faint on the spot if it
didn't start first time or ever broke down (so would my mechanic!) Not a
spot of rust on it either.
I like French cars, I've had two Renaults which were brilliant and a Ford
Fiesta that let me down regularly.
We won't talk about the Lada. What a car that was and not in a positive
way.

Tweed

Lesley
November 15th 09, 03:25 PM
On Nov 14, 12:59*pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
>
> I suppose I should get a better car, but why?
*
What do you mean a better car? You say your car is reliable, cheap to
run and insure, carries what you need it to carry- sounds just right
to me. I view cars as steel cans with a wheel on each corner for
getting people and things from A to B with the minimum of fuss so your
car sounds perfect for what you need it for.

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

jmcquown[_2_]
November 16th 09, 07:23 AM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
...
On Nov 14, 12:59 pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
>
> I suppose I should get a better car, but why?

What do you mean a better car? You say your car is reliable, cheap to
run and insure, carries what you need it to carry- sounds just right
to me. I view cars as steel cans with a wheel on each corner for
getting people and things from A to B with the minimum of fuss so your
car sounds perfect for what you need it for.

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs



I feel the same way. I drive a 2002 Hyundai. It's an inexpensive but very
reliable car. It gets me where I want to go and back, what more could I
ask? And it doesn't go through fuel as if it was an alcoholic in search of
its next drink :) I've only ever done basic maintenance (oil & fluid
changes). Oh, I did just have to have the freon recharged. There was no
leak, it just needed a boost. (Living in the southern U.S., having A/C in a
vehicle is absolutely essential, even at this time of year!)

Jill

Jofirey
November 16th 09, 04:58 PM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "Lesley" > wrote in message
> ...
> On Nov 14, 12:59 pm, "Christina Websell"
> > wrote:
>>
>> I suppose I should get a better car, but why?
>
> What do you mean a better car? You say your car is reliable,
> cheap to
> run and insure, carries what you need it to carry- sounds just
> right
> to me. I view cars as steel cans with a wheel on each corner for
> getting people and things from A to B with the minimum of fuss so
> your
> car sounds perfect for what you need it for.
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs
>
>
>
> I feel the same way. I drive a 2002 Hyundai. It's an inexpensive
> but very reliable car. It gets me where I want to go and back,
> what more could I ask? And it doesn't go through fuel as if it
> was an alcoholic in search of its next drink :) I've only ever
> done basic maintenance (oil & fluid changes). Oh, I did just have
> to have the freon recharged. There was no leak, it just needed a
> boost. (Living in the southern U.S., having A/C in a vehicle is
> absolutely essential, even at this time of year!)
>
> Jill

You just described the truck my grandson has been driving back and
forth to school very vividly. Its costing my about $70 a week to
keep gas in the darn thing to keep him in school. And that's
without him doing a lot of running around. He can't take it to go
running around because it panics if it gets more than five miles
from the nearest gas.

Jo

Jofirey
November 16th 09, 07:59 PM
"Jack Campin - bogus address" > wrote in
message ...
>> Oh, I did just have to have the freon recharged. There was no
>> leak,
>> it just needed a boost.
>
> Jesus, is that **** still legal in the US? I thought it was
> banned
> worldwide for all but life-critical applications.
>
>> (Living in the southern U.S., having A/C in a vehicle is
>> absolutely
>> essential, even at this time of year!)
>
> Having your own vehicle isn't essential; neither is any form of
> private airconditioning, anywhere. Americans invented the slogan
> "if you can't take the heat get out of the kitchen" - how about
> living by it?
>
Sweetie, we never meant by that that everyone else should get out of
the kitchen. No one is planning to quit eating. We just let
someone else cook!

Personally, my allergies are such that I cannot go anywhere in the
car with the windows open. There are plenty of people with worse
allergies than mine. You solution would require that everyone who
can't function without air conditioning stop being a contributing
member of society.

Jo

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
November 16th 09, 08:58 PM
Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:

> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;

Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true where
adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents of New
York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the related
expense and inconvenience). However most of the American Southwest was
developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I live in Arizona,
there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest bus-line available runs
once an hour during the week, and not at all at night or on weekends!
In Greater Los Angeles, most household servants (unless they "live in")
need a car to get to their place of employment, because many of the
wealthier residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!

> neither is any form of
> private airconditioning, anywhere.

That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest part of
the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive heat has
never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the American Southwest can
die of heatstroke if they are limited to the outdoors and have no
shelter from the heat of the day.)

Jofirey
November 16th 09, 09:36 PM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
message m...
>
>
> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>
>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>
> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true
> where adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents
> of New York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the
> related expense and inconvenience). However most of the American
> Southwest was developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I
> live in Arizona, there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest
> bus-line available runs once an hour during the week, and not at
> all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los Angeles, most
> household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get to
> their place of employment, because many of the wealthier
> residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>
>> neither is any form of
>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>
> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
> desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
> California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest
> part of the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive
> heat has never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the
> American Southwest can die of heatstroke if they are limited to
> the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the day.)

Jofirey
November 16th 09, 09:44 PM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
message m...
>
>
> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>
>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>
> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true
> where adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents
> of New York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the
> related expense and inconvenience). However most of the American
> Southwest was developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I
> live in Arizona, there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest
> bus-line available runs once an hour during the week, and not at
> all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los Angeles, most
> household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get to
> their place of employment, because many of the wealthier
> residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>
>> neither is any form of
>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>
> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
> desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
> California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest
> part of the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive
> heat has never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the
> American Southwest can die of heatstroke if they are limited to
> the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the day.)

Absolutely true. A standard part of our weather forecast is for pet
and domestic animal safety. Here, its rare for it to be too cold to
leave a large dog outside overnight. Or a fluffy cat for that
matter. But it does happen and we get warnings to keep them in.
Same with the really hot, and especially hot windy weather. You
don't provide adequate water and shade you can find your butt in
jail. You'd better believe someone will turn you in. Faster than
they would for child abuse.

You don't see all that many flat faced dogs or cats around here, in
part because it is so easy for them to die of heat stroke. It is
unsafe to even walk a bulldog in the heat of the day.

And don't get me started on how on earth are we supposed to get them
to the vet without an airconditioned car?

Jo

jmcquown[_2_]
November 17th 09, 12:29 PM
"EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in message
m...
>
>
> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>
>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>
> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true where
> adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents of New York
> City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the related expense and
> inconvenience). However most of the American Southwest was developed with
> the automobile as necessity. Where I live in Arizona, there is NO bus
> service nearby, and the closest bus-line available runs once an hour
> during the week, and not at all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los
> Angeles, most household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get
> to their place of employment, because many of the wealthier residential
> areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>
There are are no bus-lines where I live. I'm on an island (one in a series
of a chain of islands) at the southernmost part of South Carolina. It's 10
miles to the nearest town to shop for food... am I supposed to *walk*? Even
when I lived in Tennessee I didn't live *in* the city limits, which is the
only place buses run. There are no subways (tubes) or trains anywhere I've
ever lived, either. So I wouldn't have been able to leave the house, forget
about going to the store or to work or anywhere else.

>> neither is any form of
>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>
> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a desert
> summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of California)!
> Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest part of the summer, but
> until the past few years, really excessive heat has never been a problem.
> (Even cats and dogs in the American Southwest can die of heatstroke if
> they are limited to the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the
> day.)
>
Same thing is true of the Deep South. When the temps soar into the hundreds
(farenheit) for weeks on end and the humidity is 95% it's unreasonable (in
this day and age) to expect people or pets to live without A/C if it's
available. Sure, they did it a century ago. And they weren't walking
around wearing shorts and tank tops, either (which is my mode of dress about
9 months out of the year). But this isn't 1909, or even 1959, it's 2009.
Even most old apartment buildings in areas that get very hot offer a window
A/C unit. (I lived in one built circa 1920 for a while in Tennessee). If
Jack is going to criticize us as lazy, spoiled Americans he should at least
know what he''s talking about.

Jill

jmcquown[_2_]
November 17th 09, 01:36 PM
"Jofirey" > wrote in message
...
>
> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
> message m...
>>
>>
>> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>>
>>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>>
>> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true
>> where adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents
>> of New York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the
>> related expense and inconvenience). However most of the American
>> Southwest was developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I
>> live in Arizona, there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest
>> bus-line available runs once an hour during the week, and not at
>> all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los Angeles, most
>> household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get to
>> their place of employment, because many of the wealthier
>> residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>>
>>> neither is any form of
>>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>>
>> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
>> desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
>> California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest
>> part of the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive
>> heat has never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the
>> American Southwest can die of heatstroke if they are limited to
>> the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the day.)
>
> Absolutely true. A standard part of our weather forecast is for pet
> and domestic animal safety. Here, its rare for it to be too cold to
> leave a large dog outside overnight. Or a fluffy cat for that
> matter. But it does happen and we get warnings to keep them in.
> Same with the really hot, and especially hot windy weather. You
> don't provide adequate water and shade you can find your butt in
> jail. You'd better believe someone will turn you in. Faster than
> they would for child abuse.
>
> You don't see all that many flat faced dogs or cats around here, in
> part because it is so easy for them to die of heat stroke. It is
> unsafe to even walk a bulldog in the heat of the day.
>
> And don't get me started on how on earth are we supposed to get them to
> the vet without an airconditioned car?
>
> Jo
>
>

A standard part of our weather and news forcasts asks for people who can to
donate fans and window A/C units if they have them, to help people who don't
have a way to cool their homes. Allergies notwithstanding, even if you open
the windows if there isn't a breeze, guess what? It's just friggin hot.
It's even hotter inside a house or a car, even with the windows open and
shades drawn against the sun. It's usually elderly people who die of heat
stroke in large numbers every year. But then again, I suppose Jack thinks
no one should need a fan, either.

Jill

MatSav
November 18th 09, 09:17 AM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> ...
> A standard part of our weather and news forcasts asks for
> people who can to donate fans and window A/C units if they have
> them, to help people who don't have a way to cool their homes.
> Allergies notwithstanding, even if you open the windows if
> there isn't a breeze, guess what? It's just friggin hot. It's
> even hotter inside a house or a car, even with the windows open
> and shades drawn against the sun. It's usually elderly people
> who die of heat stroke in large numbers every year. But then
> again, I suppose Jack thinks no one should need a fan, either.

As someone who doesn't tolerate high ambient temperatures at all
(it can trigger a seizure), I can sympathise. However, an
electrically powered fan doesn't actually cool the air. In fact,
it warms it up very slightly. It *may*, however, have a cooling
effect - on a body which is warmer than the surrounding air, due
to "wind chill", and evaporative cooling from a sweating body.

--
MatSav

jmcquown[_2_]
November 18th 09, 12:10 PM
"MatSav" <matthew | dot | savage | at | dsl | dot | pipex | dot | com> wrote
in message ...
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>> ...
>> A standard part of our weather and news forcasts asks for people who can
>> to donate fans and window A/C units if they have them, to help people who
>> don't have a way to cool their homes. Allergies notwithstanding, even if
>> you open the windows if there isn't a breeze, guess what? It's just
>> friggin hot. It's even hotter inside a house or a car, even with the
>> windows open and shades drawn against the sun. It's usually elderly
>> people who die of heat stroke in large numbers every year. But then
>> again, I suppose Jack thinks no one should need a fan, either.
>
> As someone who doesn't tolerate high ambient temperatures at all (it can
> trigger a seizure), I can sympathise. However, an electrically powered fan
> doesn't actually cool the air. In fact, it warms it up very slightly. It
> *may*, however, have a cooling effect - on a body which is warmer than the
> surrounding air, due to "wind chill", and evaporative cooling from a
> sweating body.
>
> --
> MatSav
>

I many hotter parts of the U.S. people make "swamp coolers". That is, a
deep pan filled with ice that a fan blows across. Caveat to this: The fan
and cord needs to off the floor. You really don't want to substitute
electrocution or an electrical fire for cooler air.

Jill

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 18th 09, 06:49 PM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
...
On Nov 14, 12:59 pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
>
> I suppose I should get a better car, but why?

What do you mean a better car? You say your car is reliable, cheap to
run and insure, carries what you need it to carry- sounds just right
to me. I view cars as steel cans with a wheel on each corner for
getting people and things from A to B with the minimum of fuss so your
car sounds perfect for what you need.
--------------

My colleagues have newer cars (of course they do, they have new lease cars)
and they make fun of my elderly Citreon which has never failed to start
first time.
Mine is not out of this.

Christina Websell[_2_]
November 19th 09, 12:36 AM
"jmcquown" > wrote in message
...
> "Jofirey" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
>> message m...
>>>
>>>
>>> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>>>
>>>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>>>
>>> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true
>>> where adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents
>>> of New York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the
>>> related expense and inconvenience). However most of the American
>>> Southwest was developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I
>>> live in Arizona, there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest
>>> bus-line available runs once an hour during the week, and not at
>>> all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los Angeles, most
>>> household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get to
>>> their place of employment, because many of the wealthier
>>> residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>>>
>>>> neither is any form of
>>>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>>>
>>> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
>>> desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
>>> California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest
>>> part of the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive
>>> heat has never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the
>>> American Southwest can die of heatstroke if they are limited to
>>> the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the day.)
>>
>> Absolutely true. A standard part of our weather forecast is for pet
>> and domestic animal safety. Here, its rare for it to be too cold to
>> leave a large dog outside overnight. Or a fluffy cat for that
>> matter. But it does happen and we get warnings to keep them in.
>> Same with the really hot, and especially hot windy weather. You
>> don't provide adequate water and shade you can find your butt in
>> jail. You'd better believe someone will turn you in. Faster than
>> they would for child abuse.
>>
>> You don't see all that many flat faced dogs or cats around here, in
>> part because it is so easy for them to die of heat stroke. It is
>> unsafe to even walk a bulldog in the heat of the day.
>>
>> And don't get me started on how on earth are we supposed to get them to
>> the vet without an airconditioned car?
>>
>> Jo
>>
>>
>
> A standard part of our weather and news forcasts asks for people who can
> to donate fans and window A/C units if they have them, to help people who
> don't have a way to cool their homes. Allergies notwithstanding, even if
> you open the windows if there isn't a breeze, guess what? It's just
> friggin hot. It's even hotter inside a house or a car, even with the
> windows open and shades drawn against the sun. It's usually elderly
> people who die of heat stroke in large numbers every year. But then
> again, I suppose Jack thinks no one should need a fan, either.
>
>
Not to worry, It's easy for him to say that from a country that has a max
of 32C and a minimum of -16C.. What could we Brits possibly know about
weather?
Hmm.
Tweed





What do we know about weather?

jmcquown[_2_]
November 19th 09, 12:13 PM
"Christina Websell" > wrote in message
...
>
> "jmcquown" > wrote in message
> ...
>> "Jofirey" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)" > wrote in
>>> message m...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Jack Campin - bogus address wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Having your own vehicle isn't essential;
>>>>
>>>> Spoken like a true resident of the British Isles! ;-) That's true
>>>> where adequate public transportation exists (I know many residents
>>>> of New York City who wouldn't DREAM of owning a car with all the
>>>> related expense and inconvenience). However most of the American
>>>> Southwest was developed with the automobile as necessity. Where I
>>>> live in Arizona, there is NO bus service nearby, and the closest
>>>> bus-line available runs once an hour during the week, and not at
>>>> all at night or on weekends! In Greater Los Angeles, most
>>>> household servants (unless they "live in") need a car to get to
>>>> their place of employment, because many of the wealthier
>>>> residential areas are MILES from any bus-line!
>>>>
>>>>> neither is any form of
>>>>> private airconditioning, anywhere.
>>>>
>>>> That's certainly true for most of Europe, but try living through a
>>>> desert summer in Arizona, Nevada, Texas or New Mexico (or parts of
>>>> California)! Europeans may be uncomfortable during the hottest
>>>> part of the summer, but until the past few years, really excessive
>>>> heat has never been a problem. (Even cats and dogs in the
>>>> American Southwest can die of heatstroke if they are limited to
>>>> the outdoors and have no shelter from the heat of the day.)
>>>
>>> Absolutely true. A standard part of our weather forecast is for pet
>>> and domestic animal safety. Here, its rare for it to be too cold to
>>> leave a large dog outside overnight. Or a fluffy cat for that
>>> matter. But it does happen and we get warnings to keep them in.
>>> Same with the really hot, and especially hot windy weather. You
>>> don't provide adequate water and shade you can find your butt in
>>> jail. You'd better believe someone will turn you in. Faster than
>>> they would for child abuse.
>>>
>>> You don't see all that many flat faced dogs or cats around here, in
>>> part because it is so easy for them to die of heat stroke. It is
>>> unsafe to even walk a bulldog in the heat of the day.
>>>
>>> And don't get me started on how on earth are we supposed to get them to
>>> the vet without an airconditioned car?
>>>
>>> Jo
>>>
>>>
>>
>> A standard part of our weather and news forcasts asks for people who can
>> to donate fans and window A/C units if they have them, to help people who
>> don't have a way to cool their homes. Allergies notwithstanding, even if
>> you open the windows if there isn't a breeze, guess what? It's just
>> friggin hot. It's even hotter inside a house or a car, even with the
>> windows open and shades drawn against the sun. It's usually elderly
>> people who die of heat stroke in large numbers every year. But then
>> again, I suppose Jack thinks no one should need a fan, either.
>>
>>
> Not to worry, It's easy for him to say that from a country that has a max
> of 32C and a minimum of -16C.. What could we Brits possibly know about
> weather?
> Hmm.
> Tweed
>
>
32C is about 89F. A walk in the park here in the summer, comparatively
speaking. I sincerely doubt it gets down to -16C which would be around 3F.
However, if you mean 16C... well hell, that's almost 61F. Cool weather!
It's been around that temp the last few days. I've had the windows open.
Haven't had to run the heat or that dreaded evil air conditioner. <wink>

Jill

Cheryl[_5_]
November 19th 09, 12:42 PM
Christina Websell wrote:

> Not to worry, It's easy for him to say that from a country that has a max
> of 32C and a minimum of -16C.. What could we Brits possibly know about
> weather?
> Hmm.
> Tweed

That's not a very wide range of temperatures at all. It's fairly similar
to my city, although to quote the experts, is 'the foggiest (124 days),
snowiest (359 cm), wettest (1514 mm), windiest (24.3 km/h average
speed), and cloudiest (1497 hours of sunshine)' in Canada, but still
rarely goes below -10C (well, OK, it can hit -20 or more) or over 30C.
Not counting wind chill factor. Really, that's quite mild by North
American standards, as I discovered when I visited and lived in other
areas. One of my sisters lives in a Canadian city much larger than my
own, in a southern part of the country, which runs from -45C to +40C in
the course of a year - again without wind chill factors.

The southern US - well, my only visit was in spring - April, May - the
southeast (Tennessee) was already like high summer back home, and the
southwest (Utah) was like an oven.

The world's a big place. -16C to 32C is pretty moderate, as climates go.
I know, because that's ours (with the addition of all the precipitation
and wind, which IIRC most parts of the UK don't get.)

--
Cheryl

EvelynVogtGamble(Divamanque)
November 19th 09, 05:49 PM
jmcquown wrote:

>>
> 32C is about 89F. A walk in the park here in the summer, comparatively
> speaking. I sincerely doubt it gets down to -16C which would be around
> 3F. However, if you mean 16C... well hell, that's almost 61F. Cool
> weather! It's been around that temp the last few days. I've had the
> windows open. Haven't had to run the heat or that dreaded evil air
> conditioner. <wink>
>
> Jill

Here in Arizona, when the temperatures get to 89F for a few days, the
weather forecasts speak of a "cooling trend"!