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View Full Version : The spay..... not a grat day. :*(


Kelly Greene
December 10th 09, 06:36 AM
We had Zephyr spayed today and brought her home dinnertime. She was still a
little wobbly but acted like we're total strangers! She so afraid of us she
wont come out from under the bed if one of us is in there. We check on her
every 15 minutes and she dashes under the bed as soon a as she sees us.
There's no response to our voices. There's no recognition in her eyes. She
has a wild frantic look. I've never seen this before after having a cat or
dog spayed. What could have happened to her there to make her so terrified,
so frightened? We're understandably very upset over this.

Yes, she's in a room by herself. It's the bedroom she likes to nap in to get
away from Phaedra and strangers when they come in the house. She has water
and a litter pan in there plus a small amount of food. We're worried.

Gandalf
December 11th 09, 11:20 PM
On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 23:36:36 -0600, "Kelly Greene" >
wrote:

>We had Zephyr spayed today and brought her home dinnertime. She was still a
>little wobbly but acted like we're total strangers! She so afraid of us she
>wont come out from under the bed if one of us is in there. We check on her
>every 15 minutes and she dashes under the bed as soon a as she sees us.
>There's no response to our voices. There's no recognition in her eyes. She
>has a wild frantic look. I've never seen this before after having a cat or
>dog spayed. What could have happened to her there to make her so terrified,
>so frightened? We're understandably very upset over this.
>
>Yes, she's in a room by herself. It's the bedroom she likes to nap in to get
>away from Phaedra and strangers when they come in the house. She has water
>and a litter pan in there plus a small amount of food. We're worried.

The most commonly used anesthetic for cat is Ketamine. It's a single
intramuscular injection that is very easy to administer. The dose is
based on weight, but there is fair amount of latitude.

It's nasty: it's also hallucinogenic. Think bad LSD trip; every time
it's used.

I don't let my vet use Ketamine, I demand that they use isoflurane, an
inhaled anesthetic. It costs a bit more, but when my cat wakes up, she's
'back to normal' in a MUCH shorter period of time.

For now, I would recommend that you just leave your cat alone, while the
effects of the Ketamine wear off. Put out just a LITTLE food and water;
she could vomit and aspirate, that's how Jimi Hendrix died.

By 24 hours, she'll be back to normal.

Keep an eye on her sutures. If she doesn't have the cone head collar
(which freaks them out, but IS very necessary) she will likely chew at
her sutures, which can be very, very bad. Virtually every vet uses them,
but not all.

Keep an eye on her incision, for signs of infection: redness, swelling,
fluid discharge.

If you see any of that get to the vet *immediately*: you don't want
pathogenic bacteria to get a foothold in her abdominal cavity.

Good luck.


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FirstHit
December 12th 09, 02:53 AM
On Dec 9, 9:36*pm, "Kelly Greene" > wrote:
> We had Zephyr spayed today and brought her home dinnertime. She was still a
> little wobbly but acted like we're total strangers! She so afraid of us she
> wont come out from under the bed if one of us is in there. *We check on her
> every 15 minutes and she dashes under the bed as soon a as she sees us.
> There's no response to our voices. There's no recognition in her eyes. She
> has a wild frantic look. I've never seen this before after having a cat or
> dog spayed. What could have happened to her there to make her so terrified,
> so frightened? We're understandably very upset over this.
>
> Yes, she's in a room by herself. It's the bedroom she likes to nap in to get
> away from Phaedra and strangers when they come in the house. She has water
> and a litter pan in there plus a small amount of food. *We're worried.

Things will be ok. The cat is sick right now, and sick cats can act
that way.

FirstHit

Lesley
December 12th 09, 06:55 PM
On 11 Dec, 14:20, (Gandalf) wrote:

>
> I don't let my vet use Ketamine, I demand that they use isoflurane, an
> inhaled anesthetic. It costs a bit more, but when my cat wakes up, she's
> 'back to normal' in a MUCH shorter period of time.
>

My vet only uses Ketamine if there is a clinical reason to do so and
recommends isoflurane for routine surgery. Isoflurane is wonderful
stuff, When I took my first cats for their spay in 21 years ago, they
were at the vets all day and one of them had needed a double dose of
an injectable anaesthetic with the result that night we had to stay up
with her and thought she had a chance of not lasting the night. 6
years ago when the Fabulous Furballs were done using isoflurane- I
took them in just before 9.00 and collected them a few hours later-
both a bit groggy but after sleeping in the carrier on the way home
when they woke up again they were almost back to normal and within an
hour or two of getting home the only evidence they'd been to the vet
was the bald patches...and my vet charges the same whatever
anaesthetic they use

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Kelly Greene
December 13th 09, 05:58 AM
"Gandalf" > wrote in message
...
> On Wed, 9 Dec 2009 23:36:36 -0600, "Kelly Greene" >
> wrote:
>
>>We had Zephyr spayed today and brought her home dinnertime. She was still
>>a
>>little wobbly but acted like we're total strangers! She so afraid of us
>>she
>>wont come out from under the bed if one of us is in there. We check on
>>her
>>every 15 minutes and she dashes under the bed as soon a as she sees us.
>>There's no response to our voices. There's no recognition in her eyes. She
>>has a wild frantic look. I've never seen this before after having a cat or
>>dog spayed. What could have happened to her there to make her so
>>terrified,
>>so frightened? We're understandably very upset over this.
>>
>>Yes, she's in a room by herself. It's the bedroom she likes to nap in to
>>get
>>away from Phaedra and strangers when they come in the house. She has water
>>and a litter pan in there plus a small amount of food. We're worried.
>
> The most commonly used anesthetic for cat is Ketamine. It's a single
> intramuscular injection that is very easy to administer. The dose is
> based on weight, but there is fair amount of latitude.
>
> It's nasty: it's also hallucinogenic. Think bad LSD trip; every time
> it's used.
>
> I don't let my vet use Ketamine, I demand that they use isoflurane, an
> inhaled anesthetic. It costs a bit more, but when my cat wakes up, she's
> 'back to normal' in a MUCH shorter period of time.
>
> For now, I would recommend that you just leave your cat alone, while the
> effects of the Ketamine wear off. Put out just a LITTLE food and water;
> she could vomit and aspirate, that's how Jimi Hendrix died.
>
> By 24 hours, she'll be back to normal.
>
> Keep an eye on her sutures. If she doesn't have the cone head collar
> (which freaks them out, but IS very necessary) she will likely chew at
> her sutures, which can be very, very bad. Virtually every vet uses them,
> but not all.
>
> Keep an eye on her incision, for signs of infection: redness, swelling,
> fluid discharge.
>
> If you see any of that get to the vet *immediately*: you don't want
> pathogenic bacteria to get a foothold in her abdominal cavity.
>
> Good luck.

Thank you for the advice. She is doing fine now. :-) It did take about 24
hours for her to get back to normal. I don't know what kind of anesthesia
they used. I didn't think to ask. Her incision looks really good with no
redness, weeping or swellings. She doesn't lick at it. They used some kind
of skin glue instead of sutures. Her sutures are internal. She's eating
like a horse again and even played a little with her rabbit fur ball
tonight.

>
>
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> http://www.avast.com
>
>
>

Kelly Greene
December 13th 09, 06:04 AM
"Lesley" > wrote in message
...
> On 11 Dec, 14:20, (Gandalf) wrote:
>
>>
>> I don't let my vet use Ketamine, I demand that they use isoflurane, an
>> inhaled anesthetic. It costs a bit more, but when my cat wakes up, she's
>> 'back to normal' in a MUCH shorter period of time.
>>
>
> My vet only uses Ketamine if there is a clinical reason to do so and
> recommends isoflurane for routine surgery. Isoflurane is wonderful
> stuff, When I took my first cats for their spay in 21 years ago, they
> were at the vets all day and one of them had needed a double dose of
> an injectable anaesthetic with the result that night we had to stay up
> with her and thought she had a chance of not lasting the night. 6
> years ago when the Fabulous Furballs were done using isoflurane- I
> took them in just before 9.00 and collected them a few hours later-
> both a bit groggy but after sleeping in the carrier on the way home
> when they woke up again they were almost back to normal and within an
> hour or two of getting home the only evidence they'd been to the vet
> was the bald patches...and my vet charges the same whatever
> anaesthetic they use

Where I worked the vets used Flourahane (sp?) for spays and Ketamine
injection for castrations. Another vet I knew at the time used Fleuro' even
for castrations. They apparently do feel pain with Ket' but are unable to
react to it as it paralyzes them. They cry and growl during the procedure.
I knew because I held them wrapped in a towel as they were done. :*( I'm
sure they have new and safer updated products these days than Flourathane.
:-)

>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

Kelly Greene
December 13th 09, 06:05 AM
"FirstHit" > wrote in message
...
On Dec 9, 9:36 pm, "Kelly Greene" > wrote:
> We had Zephyr spayed today and brought her home dinnertime. She was still
> a
> little wobbly but acted like we're total strangers! She so afraid of us
> she
> wont come out from under the bed if one of us is in there. We check on her
> every 15 minutes and she dashes under the bed as soon a as she sees us.
> There's no response to our voices. There's no recognition in her eyes. She
> has a wild frantic look. I've never seen this before after having a cat or
> dog spayed. What could have happened to her there to make her so
> terrified,
> so frightened? We're understandably very upset over this.
>
> Yes, she's in a room by herself. It's the bedroom she likes to nap in to
> get
> away from Phaedra and strangers when they come in the house. She has water
> and a litter pan in there plus a small amount of food. We're worried.

Things will be ok. The cat is sick right now, and sick cats can act
that way.

FirstHit

I shudder to think we have to put Phaedra through this in Feb. :*(