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Guitarmakermark
December 10th 09, 09:06 PM
Hi, All.....

We have a new cat in our home, she adopted us. She apparently was
abandoned nearby, and she just showed up on our doorstep.

Problem is, our original cat will not accept the new kitty into the
household. He fights with her at every opportunity, so we keep them
separated at all times....(one cat in, the other out, and vice-versa.)

Original cat is neutered male, adopted and bottle-fed by us when he
was an orphaned feral infant. He is bonded closely to my wife and me,
but always shys away from other people.

New stray cat is 5 to 7 years old, spayed and healthy, very sweet
people-loving kitty, very accepting of strangers.

Are we forever going to have these conflicts going on, or is there a
way to get our original cat to lighten up and accept the new kitty?

We're hoping someone here can offer some constructive advice!

Thanks,

Mark

Bill Graham
December 11th 09, 12:22 AM
"Guitarmakermark" > wrote in message
...
> Hi, All.....
>
> We have a new cat in our home, she adopted us. She apparently was
> abandoned nearby, and she just showed up on our doorstep.
>
> Problem is, our original cat will not accept the new kitty into the
> household. He fights with her at every opportunity, so we keep them
> separated at all times....(one cat in, the other out, and vice-versa.)
>
> Original cat is neutered male, adopted and bottle-fed by us when he
> was an orphaned feral infant. He is bonded closely to my wife and me,
> but always shys away from other people.
>
> New stray cat is 5 to 7 years old, spayed and healthy, very sweet
> people-loving kitty, very accepting of strangers.
>
> Are we forever going to have these conflicts going on, or is there a
> way to get our original cat to lighten up and accept the new kitty?
>
> We're hoping someone here can offer some constructive advice!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mark

Generally, these problems sort themselves out with time. Keep putting the
two together, and shout at them when they fight and/or hiss at one
another.....Pretty soon they will learn to at least tolerate one another. We
have had this problem with each new cat we got, and now we have 5 of them.
The newest one took a year before she was accepted into the group. It helps
if there is some outside the group threat that they can fight, or be
frightened by together.....We have wild raccoons that we feed, and the cats
refuse to allow the raccoons into the house, so they guard the cat doors at
night for this purpose, and they take turns doing this. The two who had the
most trouble accepting one another were sharing the same inside hall one
night during a thunderstorm.....Threats like this tend to draw them
together.

Mark Earnest
December 11th 09, 05:14 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Guitarmakermark" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi, All.....
>>
>> We have a new cat in our home, she adopted us. She apparently was
>> abandoned nearby, and she just showed up on our doorstep.
>>
>> Problem is, our original cat will not accept the new kitty into the
>> household. He fights with her at every opportunity, so we keep them
>> separated at all times....(one cat in, the other out, and vice-versa.)
>>
>> Original cat is neutered male, adopted and bottle-fed by us when he
>> was an orphaned feral infant. He is bonded closely to my wife and me,
>> but always shys away from other people.
>>
>> New stray cat is 5 to 7 years old, spayed and healthy, very sweet
>> people-loving kitty, very accepting of strangers.
>>
>> Are we forever going to have these conflicts going on, or is there a
>> way to get our original cat to lighten up and accept the new kitty?
>>
>> We're hoping someone here can offer some constructive advice!
>>
>> Thanks,
>>
>> Mark
>
> Generally, these problems sort themselves out with time. Keep putting the
> two together, and shout at them when they fight and/or hiss at one
> another.....Pretty soon they will learn to at least tolerate one another.
> We have had this problem with each new cat we got, and now we have 5 of
> them. The newest one took a year before she was accepted into the group.
> It helps if there is some outside the group threat that they can fight, or
> be frightened by together.....We have wild raccoons that we feed, and the
> cats refuse to allow the raccoons into the house, so they guard the cat
> doors at night for this purpose, and they take turns doing this. The two
> who had the most trouble accepting one another were sharing the same
> inside hall one night during a thunderstorm.....Threats like this tend to
> draw them together.

**Your cats have quite a responsibility and trust to keep those raccoons out
of the house.
I'm sure the cats know it is great to have such a qualified job.

**My two cats' only responsibility seems to be to go into all the nooks and
crannies "dead" areas of the house, sit down there, and liven things up,
if that makes any sense.

---MIKE---
December 11th 09, 12:46 PM
Bill Graham rote:

>Generally, these problems sort
> themselves out with time. Keep putting
> the two together, and shout at them
> when they fight and/or hiss at one
> another.

That is terrible advice. Keep the new cat in a room by herself for a
week at least. Then put a baby gate at the door so the two can see each
other - this for another week. Then try letting them get together.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

cybercat
December 11th 09, 04:56 PM
"---MIKE---" > wrote in message
...
Bill Graham rote:

>>Generally, these problems sort
>> themselves out with time. Keep putting
>> the two together, and shout at them
>> when they fight and/or hiss at one
>> another.

>That is terrible advice. Keep the new cat in a room by herself for a
>week at least. Then put a baby gate at the door so the two can see each
>other - this for another week. Then try letting them get together.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Mike is right. "Bill Graham" is here to upset the stupid, softhearted cat
people.

Matthew[_3_]
December 11th 09, 05:04 PM
"Bill Graham" >
< snipped>

ARE YOU AN IDIOT????


You never force any animal to be with one another. Man I hope you aren't in
an area where there are rabies concern. Raccoons are one of the number one
carriers where I am.

Sherry
December 11th 09, 07:41 PM
On Dec 10, 3:06*pm, Guitarmakermark > wrote:
> Hi, All.....
>
> We have a new cat in our home, she adopted us. *She apparently was
> abandoned nearby, and she just showed up on our doorstep.
>
> Problem is, our original cat will not accept the new kitty into the
> household. *He fights with her at every opportunity, so we keep them
> separated at all times....(one cat in, the other out, and vice-versa.)
>
> Original cat is neutered male, adopted and bottle-fed by us when he
> was an orphaned feral infant. *He is bonded closely to my wife and me,
> but always shys away from other people.
>
> New stray cat is 5 to 7 years old, spayed and healthy, very sweet
> people-loving kitty, very accepting of strangers.
>
> Are we forever going to have these conflicts going on, or is there a
> way to get our original cat to lighten up and accept the new kitty?
>
> We're hoping someone here can offer some constructive advice!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mark

They may not ever be best friends, but they'll learn to tolerate each
other,
if they're introduced properly and slowly. (I'm sure others have
already
given you lots of info. about that)
My advice would be to target Resident Cat with a lot of extra
attention, while
he's getting used to the idea of an interloper. Sometimes even
neutered cats
can get all territorial and start showing their displeasure by peeing/
pooping
inappropriately. Some neutered males even start spraying.
I think it's awesome that you took in the stray. The best cats I ever
had were
strays. It's almost like they're....*grateful* or something.

Sherry

Bill Graham
December 11th 09, 09:58 PM
"---MIKE---" > wrote in message
...
Bill Graham rote:

>Generally, these problems sort
> themselves out with time. Keep putting
> the two together, and shout at them
> when they fight and/or hiss at one
> another.

That is terrible advice. Keep the new cat in a room by herself for a
week at least. Then put a baby gate at the door so the two can see each
other - this for another week. Then try letting them get together.

---MIKE---

No, THAT is terrible advice.....The first step in training any animal (or
human) is to let them know what you want them to do. If they don't know
that, then there is no hope of them ever doing what you want.

Bill Graham
December 11th 09, 10:07 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> "Bill Graham" >
> < snipped>
>
> ARE YOU AN IDIOT????
>
>
> You never force any animal to be with one another. Man I hope you aren't
> in an area where there are rabies concern. Raccoons are one of the number
> one carriers where I am.
>
Idiots are those who have trouble reading.....Where did I ever say that I
force my cats to associate with raccoons? My cats are outside cats. They
will be exposed to the raccoons whether I like it or not. We feed squirrels,
raccoons, birds, possums and stray cats, as well as our own cats. The
raccoons don't bother with my cats because they don't compete for the same
food.....The raccoons eat dog kibbles, and my cats eat cat food which they
get inside my house. Unfortunately, the cats get outside through two cat
doors that we have in both sides of the house, and the smaller raccoons can
fit through these doors also, so the cats keep the raccoons out of the
house, as a simple exercise in territorial imperative.

Bill Graham
December 11th 09, 10:15 PM
"Sherry" > wrote in message
...
On Dec 10, 3:06 pm, Guitarmakermark > wrote:
> Hi, All.....
>
> We have a new cat in our home, she adopted us. She apparently was
> abandoned nearby, and she just showed up on our doorstep.
>
> Problem is, our original cat will not accept the new kitty into the
> household. He fights with her at every opportunity, so we keep them
> separated at all times....(one cat in, the other out, and vice-versa.)
>
> Original cat is neutered male, adopted and bottle-fed by us when he
> was an orphaned feral infant. He is bonded closely to my wife and me,
> but always shys away from other people.
>
> New stray cat is 5 to 7 years old, spayed and healthy, very sweet
> people-loving kitty, very accepting of strangers.
>
> Are we forever going to have these conflicts going on, or is there a
> way to get our original cat to lighten up and accept the new kitty?
>
> We're hoping someone here can offer some constructive advice!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Mark

They may not ever be best friends, but they'll learn to tolerate each
other,
if they're introduced properly and slowly. (I'm sure others have
already
given you lots of info. about that)
My advice would be to target Resident Cat with a lot of extra
attention, while
he's getting used to the idea of an interloper. Sometimes even
neutered cats
can get all territorial and start showing their displeasure by peeing/
pooping
inappropriately. Some neutered males even start spraying.
I think it's awesome that you took in the stray. The best cats I ever
had were
strays. It's almost like they're....*grateful* or something.

Sherry

I agree....The best cats are the strays that you take in and save from a
miserable life eating garbage and living in the cold. Smokey, our feral cat,
and B-K, our Burger King parking lot cat, are the most appreciative cats we
have. B-K really learned how to get along with people in that parking lot.
Today, he is known by everyone on our block, and goes in all their houses.

Guitarmakermark
December 12th 09, 02:12 AM
We have been attempting to introduce those two, but it has not been
going well. At our sliding glass patio door, Resident Cat lunges at
the stray, and the stray lunges back only after she has exhausted all
her attempts to signal Mr. Resident that she is willing to
negotiate....she rolls on her back and shows her belly, etc.

We cannot afford a vet bill if something were to happen, were these
two to meet face-to-face inside our house.

They have squared off a few times in our back yard, with Resident
Kitty chasing her out of the yard, every time.

We want Stray kitty to come live with us, but it has been a few weeks
already and it doesn't seem to be getting any better.

More (constructive) comments or ideas, anyone?

Thanks!

Mark

cybercat
December 12th 09, 02:27 AM
"Guitarmakermark" > wrote in message
...
> We have been attempting to introduce those two, but it has not been
> going well. At our sliding glass patio door, Resident Cat lunges at
> the stray, and the stray lunges back only after she has exhausted all
> her attempts to signal Mr. Resident that she is willing to
> negotiate....she rolls on her back and shows her belly, etc.
>
> We cannot afford a vet bill if something were to happen, were these
> two to meet face-to-face inside our house.
>
> They have squared off a few times in our back yard, with Resident
> Kitty chasing her out of the yard, every time.
>
> We want Stray kitty to come live with us, but it has been a few weeks
> already and it doesn't seem to be getting any better.
>
> More (constructive) comments or ideas, anyone?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mark

You bring the stray in, put her in a room with food box water toys bed. It
would be best if the room had a screened door, but it is fine if you just
let your cat sniff her under the door. Patience. Keep both cats inside and
separated. Patience. Weeks. Pet your cat when you have the stray's scent all
over you.

If you are not willing to do this, for starters, forget about it.

Sherry
December 12th 09, 03:35 AM
On Dec 11, 8:12*pm, Guitarmakermark > wrote:
> We have been attempting to introduce those two, but it has not been
> going well. *At our sliding glass patio door, Resident Cat lunges at
> the stray, and the stray lunges back only after she has exhausted all
> her attempts to signal Mr. Resident that she is willing to
> negotiate....she rolls on her back and shows her belly, etc.
>
> We cannot afford a vet bill if something were to happen, were these
> two to meet face-to-face inside our house.
>
> They have squared off a few times in our back yard, with Resident
> Kitty chasing her out of the yard, every time.
>
> We want Stray kitty to come live with us, but it has been a few weeks
> already and it doesn't seem to be getting any better.
>
> More (constructive) comments or ideas, anyone?
>
> Thanks!
>
> Mark

I would bring Stray Cat in the house immediately and lock her up in a
bedroom,
or bathroom if you don't have a bedroom. Sounds mean, but there's a
big
payoff down the road for her. IIRC Bosley stayed in the bedroom two
months,
but Bosley was extreme aggressive.
Take her to the vet and get her tested for
FeLV, worms, fleas, ear mites, anything communicable.
Cybercat pretty well summed up the rest of it. It just takes time.
Lots of time. I bet
I have introduced a dozen cats over the last ten years. I NEVER had
one who
didn't finally come around, and the others give up hissing and
spitting. It'll work

Good luck!.

Sherry

Matthew[_3_]
December 12th 09, 07:56 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> g.com...
>>
>> "Bill Graham" >
>> < snipped>
>>
>> ARE YOU AN IDIOT????
>>
>>
>> You never force any animal to be with one another. Man I hope you aren't
>> in an area where there are rabies concern. Raccoons are one of the
>> number one carriers where I am.
>>
> Idiots are those who have trouble reading.....Where did I ever say that I
> force my cats to associate with raccoons? My cats are outside cats. They
> will be exposed to the raccoons whether I like it or not. We feed
> squirrels, raccoons, birds, possums and stray cats, as well as our own
> cats. The raccoons don't bother with my cats because they don't compete
> for the same food.....The raccoons eat dog kibbles, and my cats eat cat
> food which they get inside my house. Unfortunately, the cats get outside
> through two cat doors that we have in both sides of the house, and the
> smaller raccoons can fit through these doors also, so the cats keep the
> raccoons out of the house, as a simple exercise in territorial imperative.

NO I CALLED YOU AN IDIOT for forcing the cats to be together with out proper
introductions
And you are in idiot for feeding wild animals

starcat
December 12th 09, 04:06 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Guitarmakermark" > wrote in message
> ...
>> We have been attempting to introduce those two, but it has not been
>> going well. At our sliding glass patio door, Resident Cat lunges at
>> the stray, and the stray lunges back only after she has exhausted all
>> her attempts to signal Mr. Resident that she is willing to
>> negotiate....she rolls on her back and shows her belly, etc.
>>
>> We cannot afford a vet bill if something were to happen, were these
>> two to meet face-to-face inside our house.
>>
>> They have squared off a few times in our back yard, with Resident
>> Kitty chasing her out of the yard, every time.
>>
>> We want Stray kitty to come live with us, but it has been a few weeks
>> already and it doesn't seem to be getting any better.
>>
>> More (constructive) comments or ideas, anyone?
>>
>> Thanks!
>>
>> Mark
>
> You bring the stray in, put her in a room with food box water toys bed. It
> would be best if the room had a screened door, but it is fine if you just
> let your cat sniff her under the door. Patience. Keep both cats inside and
> separated. Patience. Weeks. Pet your cat when you have the stray's scent
> all over you.
>
> If you are not willing to do this, for starters, forget about it.
>
Excellent advice. And be aware it can take more than a month, but they WILL
learn to tolerate one another. Cats are not like dogs. They do not "work
it out" when forced together. Cats, in fact, are much more territorial than
dogs, so introducing a newcomer can take more time than with a dog. Ignore
Mr. Graham. His so-called advice is useless.

Bill Graham
December 12th 09, 10:09 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Matthew" > wrote in message
>> g.com...
>>>
>>> "Bill Graham" >
>>> < snipped>
>>>
>>> ARE YOU AN IDIOT????
>>>
>>>
>>> You never force any animal to be with one another. Man I hope you
>>> aren't in an area where there are rabies concern. Raccoons are one of
>>> the number one carriers where I am.
>>>
>> Idiots are those who have trouble reading.....Where did I ever say that I
>> force my cats to associate with raccoons? My cats are outside cats. They
>> will be exposed to the raccoons whether I like it or not. We feed
>> squirrels, raccoons, birds, possums and stray cats, as well as our own
>> cats. The raccoons don't bother with my cats because they don't compete
>> for the same food.....The raccoons eat dog kibbles, and my cats eat cat
>> food which they get inside my house. Unfortunately, the cats get outside
>> through two cat doors that we have in both sides of the house, and the
>> smaller raccoons can fit through these doors also, so the cats keep the
>> raccoons out of the house, as a simple exercise in territorial
>> imperative.
>
> NO I CALLED YOU AN IDIOT for forcing the cats to be together with out
> proper introductions
> And you are in idiot for feeding wild animals
>
No.....It's your God who starves millions of little furry creatures to death
every Winter.....I make it a practice to feed as many of them as I can
afford to feed. - And, I am not exactly sure what you mean by, "proper
introductions". I introduce my cats to one another as soon as I can, and in
the most proper way possible, but I do not cater to their tendency to not
tolerate one another.....I make it known to them that I expect them to get
along, and share their territory as soon as possible, and it works....They
do get along, especially when I am around.

Bill Graham
December 12th 09, 10:20 PM
"starcat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Guitarmakermark" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> We have been attempting to introduce those two, but it has not been
>>> going well. At our sliding glass patio door, Resident Cat lunges at
>>> the stray, and the stray lunges back only after she has exhausted all
>>> her attempts to signal Mr. Resident that she is willing to
>>> negotiate....she rolls on her back and shows her belly, etc.
>>>
>>> We cannot afford a vet bill if something were to happen, were these
>>> two to meet face-to-face inside our house.
>>>
>>> They have squared off a few times in our back yard, with Resident
>>> Kitty chasing her out of the yard, every time.
>>>
>>> We want Stray kitty to come live with us, but it has been a few weeks
>>> already and it doesn't seem to be getting any better.
>>>
>>> More (constructive) comments or ideas, anyone?
>>>
>>> Thanks!
>>>
>>> Mark
>>
>> You bring the stray in, put her in a room with food box water toys bed.
>> It would be best if the room had a screened door, but it is fine if you
>> just let your cat sniff her under the door. Patience. Keep both cats
>> inside and separated. Patience. Weeks. Pet your cat when you have the
>> stray's scent all over you.
>>
>> If you are not willing to do this, for starters, forget about it.
>>
> Excellent advice. And be aware it can take more than a month, but they
> WILL learn to tolerate one another. Cats are not like dogs. They do not
> "work it out" when forced together. Cats, in fact, are much more
> territorial than dogs, so introducing a newcomer can take more time than
> with a dog. Ignore Mr. Graham. His so-called advice is useless.
My wife's daughter had two cats who never learned to get along. they
separated the house into two halves, and each one occupied it's own half
exclusively until the day they died. If you tolerate that, then have at it.
In my case, I have five cats, and they all get along together fine in all
parts of our home. I have even caught as many as four of them all sleeping
on our dining room table in the morning. Let your cats know what you want
and expect, and their behavior will approach that end, either rapidly or
slowly, depending on your tolerance for the opposite behavior.

Matthew[_3_]
December 12th 09, 11:02 PM
"Bill Graham" >

< snipped >

Hmmm Control issues I see. They do have medication for that and 800 help
lines

cybercat
December 12th 09, 11:49 PM
"Matthew" > wrote :>> convince......Were
you president of your college debating team? - You
>> should consider a career as a trail lawyer......
>
> You are dangerous don't need to argue that. Your own statements prove it.
>
No really, you should be a trail lawyer, Maffew. :D kf this asshole and be
finished with it, c'monnnnn ....

cybercat
December 12th 09, 11:50 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> "Bill Graham" >
>
> < snipped >
>
> Hmmm Control issues I see. They do have medication for that and 800
> help lines

Another ignorant, arrogant, aggressive slob going for Usenet Therapy. heh

Matthew[_3_]
December 13th 09, 01:17 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Matthew" > wrote :>> convince......Were
> you president of your college debating team? - You
>>> should consider a career as a trail lawyer......
>>
>> You are dangerous don't need to argue that. Your own statements prove
>> it.
>>
> No really, you should be a trail lawyer, Maffew. :D kf this asshole and
> be finished with it, c'monnnnn ....

I can't he is way to dangerous to kill file. He keeps giving this bad of
advice and someone follows it I hate to see the out come

cybercat
December 13th 09, 02:30 AM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
g.com...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Matthew" > wrote :>> convince......Were
>> you president of your college debating team? - You
>>>> should consider a career as a trail lawyer......
>>>
>>> You are dangerous don't need to argue that. Your own statements prove
>>> it.
>>>
>> No really, you should be a trail lawyer, Maffew. :D kf this asshole and
>> be finished with it, c'monnnnn ....
>
> I can't he is way to dangerous to kill file. He keeps giving this bad of
> advice and someone follows it I hate to see the out come

You're right Matthew. The Stupid People need you. You are a saint. I
couldn't do it.

Rene
December 15th 09, 09:21 PM
> I would bring Stray Cat in the house immediately and lock her up in a
> bedroom,
> or bathroom if you don't have a bedroom. Sounds mean, but there's a
> big
> payoff down the road for her. IIRC Bosley stayed in the bedroom two
> months,

I agree. I have integrated several cats (and have also had to re-
introduce after a traumatic experience after a vet visit). Here are
some tips.

1. PATIENCE, it may take weeks or even months. Take it slowly and
don't rush anything.
2. Take a towel and rub it over one cat, then the other, repeat, to
exchange smells.
3. Have a positive attitude. This can go a long way. Cats pick up on
vibes.
4. After several days, rotate where the cats are (without them seeing
each other) and let them smell each other's smells.
5. Play with them under a door.
6. Feed them on either side of the door.
7. Once all hissing stops, try installing a screen in the door to let
them see, but not touch, each other. Another idea, if you don't have a
screen, is to buy two baby gates and stack them in the doorway. Play
with them/feed them near one another.

They may not ever be best friends, but they certainly can live
together peacefully. Our oldest doesn't care for our youngest, for
example, but he will not hurt her (and she's not afraid of him).

You may also want to buy some Feliway diffusers and place near where
the cats frequent. They do help take the edge off.