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cybercat
December 26th 09, 06:56 AM
She hardly took notice of the elf hat the first time we put it on, just
leaped around in it after the feather on a string. Hilarious. This is a
lovely, bright, gentle cat, who plays a lot but never bites hard, loves
snuggling and even kisses, and cuts the worst poots ever. Hence her
secondary name, "Pootie Jane." :) Health and happiness to you all and all
your family members human, feline and other species.

http://s333.photobucket.com/albums/m391/sweetiecats/Bella/

Allan Smith
December 26th 09, 10:06 AM
cybercat,

And to you and yours.

What lovely color - I've not often seen such a rich brown. Perhaps she has
a bit of Burmese in her.

Roundworms often cause a gassy, foul-smelling intestinal tract, especially
in kittens. You might take a stool sample to the vet for a parasite-check.
Most don't charge more than $20, and results are typically available in 15
to 30 minutes.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> She hardly took notice of the elf hat the first time we put it on, just
> leaped around in it after the feather on a string. Hilarious. This is a

Phil P.
December 26th 09, 12:53 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> She hardly took notice of the elf hat the first time we put it on, just
> leaped around in it after the feather on a string. Hilarious. This is a
> lovely, bright, gentle cat, who plays a lot but never bites hard, loves
> snuggling and even kisses, and cuts the worst poots ever. Hence her
> secondary name, "Pootie Jane." :) Health and happiness to you all and all
> your family members human, feline and other species.
>
> http://s333.photobucket.com/albums/m391/sweetiecats/Bella/


What a little sweetie! She has such beautiful coloring. I know you're going
to spoil the hell out her- its hard not to when they're so young.

The shelter should have given you her medical records with the dates of her
vaccinations, FeLV/FIV testing, and worming. If her last worming was more
than 10 days ago, she may need to be wormed again. Some shelters skip the
second worming if the cat is adopted before she's due to be wormed again.
When you bring her in for her first check up next week, tell your vet about
the malodorous poop and ask him to check her poop. He'll probably just worm
her again.

This little guy has been tugging on my heartstrings. He was abandoned in an
apartment for almost 3 weeks after his owners moved and left him behind.
He's recovering nicely and looks like a completely different cat. When we
got him he was just fur and bones.

http://maxshouse.com/Mine/Rudy/pages/Rudy_DSC_0011214.htm


Here's a funny sequence of the clique in my shelter colony. The three are
always together. If you follow the sequence, you'll see how two are
actually waiting for the third to catch up. It was hilarious to watch.
Makes you laugh at the "studies" that said cats are solitary and asocial.
lol!

http://maxshouse.com/Feral/Shelter_colony_2/index.htm

Phil

cybercat
December 26th 09, 07:43 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote
>
> This little guy has been tugging on my heartstrings. He was abandoned in
> an
> apartment for almost 3 weeks after his owners moved and left him behind.
> He's recovering nicely and looks like a completely different cat. When we
> got him he was just fur and bones.
>
> http://maxshouse.com/Mine/Rudy/pages/Rudy_DSC_0011214.htm
>

Oh Phil, he is so beautiful and what an expression. You take the best cat
photos. He already loves you. Have you been fostering him at home?

Cheryl[_3_]
December 26th 09, 08:20 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> She hardly took notice of the elf hat the first time we put it on, just
> leaped around in it after the feather on a string. Hilarious. This is a
> lovely, bright, gentle cat, who plays a lot but never bites hard, loves
> snuggling and even kisses, and cuts the worst poots ever. Hence her
> secondary name, "Pootie Jane." :) Health and happiness to you all and all
> your family members human, feline and other species.
>
> http://s333.photobucket.com/albums/m391/sweetiecats/Bella/
>

Ok, she is just adorable! I love black cats! Funny how most kitten
pictures are of them sleeping. About the only time you can get them to stay
still long enough. :)

cybercat
December 26th 09, 08:34 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat,
>
> And to you and yours.
>
> What lovely color - I've not often seen such a rich brown. Perhaps she
> has a bit of Burmese in her.

In person, she looks shiny black, with just an amber spot on her chest and
little bits on her toes.
>
> Roundworms often cause a gassy, foul-smelling intestinal tract, especially
> in kittens. You might take a stool sample to the vet for a parasite-check.
> Most don't charge more than $20, and results are typically available in 15
> to 30 minutes.
>

Thank you, Allan. I was unclear--I have had her since November 26th, when I
got her from the SPCA. Her paperwork included a complete history of her vet
care, just as Phil expected. She was born on September 10, and during her
stay at the SPCA had a distemper shot that needed a booster by the time I
got her. She had been wormed, tested for FIV (neg), spayed on November 10,
microchipped and tattooed while there. We took her to the vet a couple of
weeks ago and brought a fecal sample whioh came back negative. She had her
distemper booser and a thorough exam, was found to have the usual herpes
(runny eyes) and upper respiratory infection found in shelter cats and was
put on Clava mox (antibioti) liquid and ointment for her eyes. Within days
her eyes were better and her cold was gone in a week or so. They did tell us
that she only got canned food "as a treat" because the cats ate donated
food, which was usually dry. Since being home with us Bella gets Fancy Feast
every twelve hours and I leave dry down for her because she is very skinny,
and eats like there was a time she was hungry and there was no food. I think
her poots have to do with the change in her diet.

cybercat
December 26th 09, 08:35 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
> ...
>> She hardly took notice of the elf hat the first time we put it on, just
>> leaped around in it after the feather on a string. Hilarious. This is a
>> lovely, bright, gentle cat, who plays a lot but never bites hard, loves
>> snuggling and even kisses, and cuts the worst poots ever. Hence her
>> secondary name, "Pootie Jane." :) Health and happiness to you all and all
>> your family members human, feline and other species.
>>
>> http://s333.photobucket.com/albums/m391/sweetiecats/Bella/
>>
>
> Ok, she is just adorable! I love black cats! Funny how most kitten
> pictures are of them sleeping. About the only time you can get them to
> stay still long enough. :)
That's a fact! For every clear photo I know I have 10 blurry ones! You might
be about due for a kitten again, eh Cheryl? :) Let me enable you ....

cybercat
December 26th 09, 08:45 PM
"Phil P." > wrote
>
> What a little sweetie! She has such beautiful coloring. I know you're
> going
> to spoil the hell out her- its hard not to when they're so young.

Yeah, I am smitten. :) Babies are so affectionate, and this kitten is so
relaxed, she handles like a ragdoll when you pick her up.

>
> The shelter should have given you her medical records with the dates of
> her
> vaccinations, FeLV/FIV testing, and worming. If her last worming was more
> than 10 days ago, she may need to be wormed again. Some shelters skip the
> second worming if the cat is adopted before she's due to be wormed again.
> When you bring her in for her first check up next week, tell your vet
> about
> the malodorous poop and ask him to check her poop. He'll probably just
> worm
> her again.

The vet asked for a fecal sample, and it came back negative. It isn't so
much smelly poops, she just passes truly evil gas. Clouds and clouds of it.
:)

>
> This little guy has been tugging on my heartstrings. He was abandoned in
> an
> apartment for almost 3 weeks after his owners moved and left him behind.
> He's recovering nicely and looks like a completely different cat. When we
> got him he was just fur and bones.
>
> http://maxshouse.com/Mine/Rudy/pages/Rudy_DSC_0011214.htm
>
>
There was an orange boy at the SPCA I wanted, but I knew I had better get
one kitten this time, until I get used to kittens, since I have never raised
one. I picked him up and was almost out the door with him, but when he
spotted Bella he hissed, and that gave my FIL time to say, "you know, you
might want to hold off on another kitten right now." He was right--because
Gracie has been very upset and it has kept me busy introducing them, giving
her a break fro Bella, making sure she gets some of her food, etc.


> Here's a funny sequence of the clique in my shelter colony. The three are
> always together. If you follow the sequence, you'll see how two are
> actually waiting for the third to catch up. It was hilarious to watch.
> Makes you laugh at the "studies" that said cats are solitary and asocial.
> lol!
>
> http://maxshouse.com/Feral/Shelter_colony_2/index.htm
>
Love these.

Bill Graham
December 26th 09, 09:02 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...

> That's a fact! For every clear photo I know I have 10 blurry ones!

You can fix this by buying a strobe light for your camera. (assuming it can
take one) This will freeze your kitty's motion and give you sharp pictures,
but they might be a bit harsh, unless you set up some reflectors to
distribute the light, or use a second, "slave" flash.....

Allan Smith
December 26th 09, 10:18 PM
cybercat,

Clavamox will do that. Most antibiotics wiil alter the intestinal flora.
Diet changes can be disruptive as well.

Get some active-culture yogurt, and see if she likes it (don't bother with
sweetened, as cats can't taste sweet, or most fruits). Most cats will eat it
off a spoon or fingertip, but you can mix a small amount in with her food.
Try for a teaspoon-full once or twice a day.

The active cultures in the yogurt will replace the intestinal microbes
killed-off by the antibiotic. You should notice a significant difference
within 48 hours.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat,
>>
>> And to you and yours.

cybercat
December 26th 09, 10:48 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat,
>
> Clavamox will do that. Most antibiotics wiil alter the intestinal flora.
> Diet changes can be disruptive as well.
>
> Get some active-culture yogurt, and see if she likes it (don't bother with
> sweetened, as cats can't taste sweet, or most fruits). Most cats will eat
> it off a spoon or fingertip, but you can mix a small amount in with her
> food. Try for a teaspoon-full once or twice a day.
>
> The active cultures in the yogurt will replace the intestinal microbes
> killed-off by the antibiotic. You should notice a significant difference
> within 48 hours.
>

She just has gas, not the runs. But you're right, my older cat Gracie got
her URI and needed a round of Clavamox and she did get the runs for a couple
of days.

jmc
December 27th 09, 01:06 AM
Suddenly, without warning, cybercat exclaimed (12/26/2009 3:45 PM):

> The vet asked for a fecal sample, and it came back negative. It isn't so
> much smelly poops, she just passes truly evil gas. Clouds and clouds of it.
> :)
>

Meep did that as a kitten. Our vet at the time suggested we put her on
adult food, which did help a little. What really helped was switching
her food away from Science Diet. At the time she was eating dry.

Tried a can of SD just recently, and she almost immediately became
Smelly Cat again. Phewy!

So, if Bella is on any kind of Science Diet, it might be worth trying a
different brand. Or trying the adult version rather than kitten food.

She's adorable, btw :)

jmc

Cheryl[_3_]
December 27th 09, 03:41 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...

> That's a fact! For every clear photo I know I have 10 blurry ones! You
> might be about due for a kitten again, eh Cheryl? :) Let me enable you
> ....

You can't! I've been that route. :) Kittens are so fun but they are like
having a baby in the house. Scarlett and Rhett took so much time and care,
but they were 2 sickly ones instead of one.

Actually, I sent an email about this girl.
http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=15309582

Call me the crazy cat lady and get it over with, if I take in another.

cybercat
December 27th 09, 05:14 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote
> Actually, I sent an email about this girl.
> http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=15309582
>

Her story is heart rending. I hope you get her.

> Call me the crazy cat lady and get it over with, if I take in another.

The only thing holding me back is my husband. Hell, I aspire to be the crazy
cat lady.

Allan Smith
December 27th 09, 09:16 AM
Kelly,

Most, but not all, cats become lactose-intolerant at about 6 months. You can
still feed them things like yogurt and cheese, because the microbes have
already consumed the milk proteins, and what you're really eating is the
bugs that ate the milk. They are good sources of protein for cats.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat,
>>
>> And to you and yours.
>>
>> What lovely color - I've not often seen such a rich brown. Perhaps she
>> has a bit of Burmese in her.
>>

Allan Smith
December 27th 09, 09:34 AM
cyber,

It isn't so much about the diarrhea, but about the gut-bugs. There are many
different organisms present in the intestine, and they live in an ecology,
that, when out of balance, can produce undesirable effects.

The primary 'sweeteners' among them are lactobacillus acidophilus,and
lactobacillus bulgaricus, both found in active yougurt cultures, along with
streptococcus thermophilius. Most "probiotic" products contain those, plus
bifidobacterium.

Generally, it is the gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria that will sometimes
be overcome by the other bugs or antibiotics, to foul effect. Fortunately,
they are easy to replace.

If you don't want to use yogurt, you can go to the drugstore and buy a
product called Lactinex without a prescription (though it must is
refrigerated, as it is live, but inactive). It is designed to rebalance the
ecology in the human intestine, and works well for cats. Mix a little in
some moist food at room temperature.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat,
>>
>> Clavamox will do that. Most antibiotics wiil alter the intestinal flora.
>> Diet changes can be disruptive as well.
>>

Bill Graham
December 28th 09, 08:07 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Cheryl" > wrote
>> Actually, I sent an email about this girl.
>> http://www.petfinder.com/petnote/displaypet.cgi?petid=15309582
>>
>
> Her story is heart rending. I hope you get her.
>
>> Call me the crazy cat lady and get it over with, if I take in another.
>
> The only thing holding me back is my husband. Hell, I aspire to be the
> crazy cat lady.
>
Do you have a purple hat?

Bill Graham
December 28th 09, 08:26 AM
"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Kelly,
>>
>> Most, but not all, cats become lactose-intolerant at about 6 months. You
>> can still feed them things like yogurt and cheese, because the microbes
>> have already consumed the milk proteins, and what you're really eating is
>> the bugs that ate the milk. They are good sources of protein for cats.
>
>
> That's good to know. :-)
>
> Tonight they feasted on fresh raw chicken livers and canned Friskies Mixed
> Grill. They both look like they ate baseballs. :-D I also ordered bone
> meal and more Missing Link for them. Although they like raw meat the
> don't care much for raw chicken bones. The other day we picked up Pro-Pet
> Skin and Coat for them. I ordered Capstar for them (fleas) for this
> spring. What do you think of that product? Even indoor pets here get
> fleas thanks to the constant passage of wild animals through everyone's
> property.


Fleas don't like to live on animals, but usually live in the rugs and
bedding, and hop on your cats just to feed.....I have found that frequent
vacuuming and washing their blankets and bedding will keep the flea count
down to an acceptable level.

Allan Smith
December 28th 09, 10:08 AM
Kelly,

I should add that "cat milk" is available in most stores. It is low-fat milk
that has had lactamase, the enzyme that breaks down lactose, added. Mine
enjoy a couple of ounces of Whiska's Cat Milk as a treat a few times a week,
and it doesn't bother them at all. There are other brands available, but
mine have a clear preference for Whiska's.

Some people aere lactose-intolerant as well, and you can find
reduced-lactose or lactose-free millk for people who are. Usually, it does
not cause problems in cats.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Kelly,
>
> Most, but not all, cats become lactose-intolerant at about 6 months. You
> can

Allan Smith
December 28th 09, 11:15 AM
Kelly,

Liver, and also heart and kidney, are good treats for cats on an otherwise
balanced diet, but keep the balance. Too much organ meat doesn't give them
the nutrients they need from muscle tissue. Mine ooccasionally get all three
organ meats as treats. I get it at the supermarket, divide it into
meal-sized portions, and repackage and freeze it.

Fleas, the scourge of critters, including us. The flea life-cycle is
complex, enabling them to survive most short-term solutions, but
understanding it provides several opportunities to interrupt it. For indoor
cats, the most likely source of fleas is the owner bringing them in from the
outdoors on clothing.

The flea has four stages in its life-cycle, and it takes about two weeks to
a couple of months to happen, depending on temperature and humidity. In
summer, two to three weeeks is sufficient, but it may take a couple of
months in winter (that's how fleas survive winter). Capstar is a good
product, as far as it goes. Keep in mind that Capstar only kills the adult
fleas on the cat and is short-acting, and that isn't always good enough
unless you give it every few days for an extended period (that can get
expensive).

An excellent article on fleas is available on Wikipedia, and the life-cycle
is described at
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flea#Life_cycle_and_habitat
and also at
http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/diseasesall/a/befreeoffleas.htm
A graphic is at
http://blog.ecosmart.com/wp-content/flea_lifecycle.gif

The Wiki article describes several non-toxic methods to control fleas
through the various stages of life-cycle.

I've found the key is to intercept the life-cycle on the pet to prevent
fleas from establishing themselves in the home. The section "For the home"
mentions the long-acting larvacide and adulticide method using the cat to
"mop-up" the larva and adults, and that's what I use (my cats are
indoor-outdoor). I've found Advantage to be the most effective, and have had
excellent results by applying it roughly every four to six weeks from late
spring through summer, once in the fall, and once in mid-winter. Exact
timings will vary depending on the climate where you live.

In the interest of using Advantage as little as possible, I use a flea-comb
once a week or so to check for flea-dirt or adult fleas, and the schedule is
modified by the results. If you hold the fur up to a light, or over a sheet
of white paper, spread it apart, and notice black specks in it, that's a cue
to treat, even if off-schedule.

In Australia, flea products are non-prescription, and are quite a bit less
expensive than here (about 40 to 50 percent less). I've used both of the
following suppliers. Products are mailed, and usually arrive within 7 to 10
calendar days. Both have Capstar as well, for much less than you'll find it
here.

http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Advocate%20Cat%22

http://www.petshed.com/products/item3622.asp

The product listed in the first link is a new one, and quite complete. Sold
in Europe as Advocate, and here as Advantage Multi, it even gets ear mites,
heartworms and intestinal worms as well. I have always found Bayer
Phamaceuticals to be a very ethical and conservative company, and I trust
their products.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Kelly,
>>
>> Most, but not all, cats become lactose-intolerant at about 6 months. You

Kelly Greene
December 31st 09, 10:10 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Tonight they feasted on fresh raw chicken livers and canned Friskies
>> Mixed Grill. They both look like they ate baseballs. :-D I also
>> ordered bone meal and more Missing Link for them. Although they like raw
>> meat the don't care much for raw chicken bones. The other day we picked
>> up Pro-Pet Skin and Coat for them. I ordered Capstar for them (fleas) for
>> this spring. What do you think of that product? Even indoor pets here
>> get fleas thanks to the constant passage of wild animals through
>> everyone's property.
>
>
> Fleas don't like to live on animals, but usually live in the rugs and
> bedding, and hop on your cats just to feed.....I have found that frequent
> vacuuming and washing their blankets and bedding will keep the flea count
> down to an acceptable level.

We had a flea infestation some years back when we had 3 dogs and a foster
cat. No amount of vacuuming and bedding washing and airing helped. We
finally used a hormone spray that kept the flea grubs from turning into
adults. In less than a month we were flea free! But I can't recall the
name of the product. I liked the product as it didn't go ON the animals and
was 100% non toxic to dogs, cats and people.

Bill Graham
December 31st 09, 11:23 PM
"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Tonight they feasted on fresh raw chicken livers and canned Friskies
>>> Mixed Grill. They both look like they ate baseballs. :-D I also
>>> ordered bone meal and more Missing Link for them. Although they like
>>> raw meat the don't care much for raw chicken bones. The other day we
>>> picked up Pro-Pet Skin and Coat for them. I ordered Capstar for them
>>> (fleas) for this spring. What do you think of that product? Even indoor
>>> pets here get fleas thanks to the constant passage of wild animals
>>> through everyone's property.
>>
>>
>> Fleas don't like to live on animals, but usually live in the rugs and
>> bedding, and hop on your cats just to feed.....I have found that frequent
>> vacuuming and washing their blankets and bedding will keep the flea count
>> down to an acceptable level.
>
> We had a flea infestation some years back when we had 3 dogs and a foster
> cat. No amount of vacuuming and bedding washing and airing helped. We
> finally used a hormone spray that kept the flea grubs from turning into
> adults. In less than a month we were flea free! But I can't recall the
> name of the product. I liked the product as it didn't go ON the animals
> and was 100% non toxic to dogs, cats and people.
I think I remember that Winter.....We had the same problem here....We
removed all the cats (I think we only had two then) and sprinkled flea
powder everywhere and left the house for a day or more, and then vacuumed
everything before we moved ourselves and the cats back in.....It was a real
bad flea infestation, and all our friends had the same problem.......

Bill Graham
December 31st 09, 11:40 PM
"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...

> finally used a hormone spray that kept the flea grubs from turning into
> adults. In less than a month we were flea free! But I can't recall the
> name of the product. I liked the product as it didn't go ON the animals
> and was 100% non toxic to dogs, cats and people.

Here is a link to a product that may be what you used....
http://www.e-bug.net/pests/fleas.shtml

Kelly Green[_3_]
January 1st 10, 12:34 AM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Kelly,
>
> Liver, and also heart and kidney, are good treats for cats on an otherwise
> balanced diet, but keep the balance. Too much organ meat doesn't give them
> the nutrients they need from muscle tissue. Mine ooccasionally get all
> three organ meats as treats. I get it at the supermarket, divide it into
> meal-sized portions, and repackage and freeze it.

Hi Allen. I'm giving them liver every few days. They get the muscle meat of
heart and gizzard mixed in their canned food almost daily. Ditto chicken
toes for the bone/teeth/calcium and phosphorus. I also add MissingLink to
that, and now ProPet Skin and Coat oil. You should see their coats. Are
you using any dry foods at all? What are you using as a "basic" day to day
diet? Mine despise "Wellness" and "SolidGold" dry foods.

>
> Fleas, the scourge of critters, including us. The flea life-cycle is
> complex, enabling them to survive most short-term solutions, but
> understanding it provides several opportunities to interrupt it. For
> indoor cats, the most likely source of fleas is the owner bringing them in
> from the outdoors on clothing.

There you go! :-( I know the wild critters drop them off here. Fleas have
been a problem since we moved out here. I sure wish I could find that flea
hormone spray.

>
> The flea has four stages in its life-cycle, and it takes about two weeks
> to a couple of months to happen, depending on temperature and humidity. In
> summer, two to three weeeks is sufficient, but it may take a couple of
> months in winter (that's how fleas survive winter). Capstar is a good
> product, as far as it goes. Keep in mind that Capstar only kills the adult
> fleas on the cat and is short-acting, and that isn't always good enough
> unless you give it every few days for an extended period (that can get
> expensive).

I want something longer acting like Revolution but the damn vet here wont
give prescriptions for stuff they sell themselves. I don't understand how
that can be legal.

>
> An excellent article on fleas is available on Wikipedia, and the
> life-cycle is described at
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flea#Life_cycle_and_habitat
> and also at
> http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/diseasesall/a/befreeoffleas.htm
> A graphic is at
> http://blog.ecosmart.com/wp-content/flea_lifecycle.gif
>
> The Wiki article describes several non-toxic methods to control fleas
> through the various stages of life-cycle.

Thanks,... I'll check these sites. :-)

>
> I've found the key is to intercept the life-cycle on the pet to prevent
> fleas from establishing themselves in the home. The section "For the home"
> mentions the long-acting larvacide and adulticide method using the cat to
> "mop-up" the larva and adults, and that's what I use (my cats are
> indoor-outdoor). I've found Advantage to be the most effective, and have
> had excellent results by applying it roughly every four to six weeks from
> late spring through summer, once in the fall, and once in mid-winter.
> Exact timings will vary depending on the climate where you live.

Is that a prescription product? Where are you getting it?

>
> In the interest of using Advantage as little as possible, I use a
> flea-comb once a week or so to check for flea-dirt or adult fleas, and the
> schedule is modified by the results. If you hold the fur up to a light, or
> over a sheet of white paper, spread it apart, and notice black specks in
> it, that's a cue to treat, even if off-schedule.
>
> In Australia, flea products are non-prescription, and are quite a bit less
> expensive than here (about 40 to 50 percent less). I've used both of the
> following suppliers. Products are mailed, and usually arrive within 7 to
> 10 calendar days. Both have Capstar as well, for much less than you'll
> find it here.
>
> http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Advocate%20Cat%22
>
> http://www.petshed.com/products/item3622.asp
>
> The product listed in the first link is a new one, and quite complete.
> Sold in Europe as Advocate, and here as Advantage Multi, it even gets ear
> mites, heartworms and intestinal worms as well. I have always found Bayer
> Phamaceuticals to be a very ethical and conservative company, and I trust
> their products.

I'll check these sites out as soon as I finish this group. :-) I can't
have fleas or ear mites and other pests infesting the girls this spring.
Also, we're moving to FL this coming year and I hear the flea problem down
there are unreal.


>
> Allan
>
> --
> One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
> ---
> True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
> that they claim for themselves.
>
> "Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> Kelly,
>>>
>>> Most, but not all, cats become lactose-intolerant at about 6 months. You
>
>

Allan Smith
January 1st 10, 09:23 PM
Kelly,

> Are you buying this stuff in the USA? All the stores here have Esbilac for
> abandoned kittens. I haven't seen a Cat Milk but can call and ask those
> further away.

Yep, in the pet foods area at almost any supermarket that sells Whiskas
products. I've bought it at Kroger, Publix, PetSmart, etc. It's in a small
box with a pull-tab on top, in the section with canned and dry cat foods.

Pix and info at
http://www.whiskas.ca/catmilk.html

Suppliers here, but I've found it in almost every supermarket I've been in.
Often in a 3-pack.
http://www.bizrate.com/cat-supplies/whiskas-cat-milk/

> I'll look for Lactose free milk next shopping trip to town. How about
> fat-free cottage cheese? Would that work?

Cottage cheese ususally doesn't bother them, though I find mine prefer hard
cheeses. Classically, cottage cheese is made with milk and "rennet", a form
of 'rennin', a digestive enzyme from the stomach of young mammals used to
digest the mother's milk. Thus, the milk is already digested, and thus very
palatable.

It is believed that cottage cheese was the first cheese ever made, when it
was discovered by the ancients that milk stored in a bag made from the
stomach of a young goat, sheep, or cow would curdle in one day, and that if
salt was added before the resulting curds were dried, they were both
extremely palatable, and would keep for very long periods of time.

It is also step one in the making of most 'finished' cheeses.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Kelly,
>>
>> I should add that "cat milk" is available in most stores. It is low-fat

barb
January 3rd 10, 07:50 PM
She's a beauty! As an owner of two beautiful black cats, I can appreciate.

Barb

cybercat
January 3rd 10, 08:10 PM
"Barb" > wrote in message
...
> She's a beauty! As an owner of two beautiful black cats, I can
> appreciate.
>
> Barb

Thank you. :) You know, I bet, how hard they are to photograph. No picture
does her justice. She is very sleek and silky and completely bonkers, as
healthy kittens her age are! She and Gracie, age ten, are working things
out, but slowly and noisily. Gracie is interested in her, but it is quite an
adjustment, getting stalked constantly. I give them both "time outs" from
one another, easy to do in a three level house. Bella's eyes are still
golden, hope they will stay that way. I adore her. Love to see pics of your
cats!

Bill Graham
January 3rd 10, 10:54 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Barb" > wrote in message
> ...
>> She's a beauty! As an owner of two beautiful black cats, I can
>> appreciate.
>>
>> Barb
>
> Thank you. :) You know, I bet, how hard they are to photograph. No picture
> does her justice. She is very sleek and silky and completely bonkers, as
> healthy kittens her age are! She and Gracie, age ten, are working things
> out, but slowly and noisily. Gracie is interested in her, but it is quite
> an adjustment, getting stalked constantly. I give them both "time outs"
> from one another, easy to do in a three level house. Bella's eyes are
> still golden, hope they will stay that way. I adore her. Love to see pics
> of your cats!
>
When photographing black or dark brown animals, try doubling the time, or
opening your lens an extra f stop for the same time.......With cheaper
cameras (film) you can do this by telling the camera that your film is half
the speed it really is. this will "trick" your camera into exposing longer,
which will result in a picture that shows off the details of your pet. Do
not photograph them with a bright light, such as an open window in the
background.....This will cause your camera to expose for the light, and not
for the pet.