PDA

View Full Version : Post Operative Questions


Seafire
December 27th 09, 12:39 AM
Hi All:

This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female
Main Coon, and for me as well.

Christmas eve Tania started bleeding from her vagina. I took her
immediately to VERG [http://www.vetemergencyreferral.com] Xrays,
ultrasound, and blood tests revealed her uterus was infected, and a Spay
operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the
director of the hospital.

I just brought her home. She is so happy! I was expecting that she would
attack me, but she is being very sweet, wanting to sit in my lap.

She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her
stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't
allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a
drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some
small cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with water.

Will she learn how to get around the impediment? Or should I see if
there is a smaller collar available? She is wobbly on her feet, bumping
into things, can't jump to her favorite places....

I am concerened about her not seemingly being able to eat and drink with
this thing on. She has to wear this for 14 days, then return to the
hospital to have the stitches removed.

Any ideas???

TIA
Bob

jmc
December 27th 09, 01:12 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Seafire exclaimed (12/26/2009 7:39 PM):
> Hi All:
>
> This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female
> Main Coon, and for me as well.
>
> Christmas eve Tania started bleeding from her vagina. I took her
> immediately to VERG [http://www.vetemergencyreferral.com] Xrays,
> ultrasound, and blood tests revealed her uterus was infected, and a Spay
> operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the
> director of the hospital.
>
> I just brought her home. She is so happy! I was expecting that she would
> attack me, but she is being very sweet, wanting to sit in my lap.
>
> She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her
> stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't
> allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a
> drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some
> small cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with water.
>
> Will she learn how to get around the impediment? Or should I see if
> there is a smaller collar available? She is wobbly on her feet, bumping
> into things, can't jump to her favorite places....
>
> I am concerened about her not seemingly being able to eat and drink with
> this thing on. She has to wear this for 14 days, then return to the
> hospital to have the stitches removed.
>
> Any ideas???
>
> TIA
> Bob


Yup. When my cat needed to wear the collar for a while, we found she
couldn't adjust to an opaque one - she would get stuck at corners and
walls because she couldn't see what was stopping her. The new collar we
bought for her was clear and a bit shorter front and back - still long
enough she couldn't get to her hind leg, but short enough that she could
maneuver it to eat and drink out of her bowls, and since she had her
peripheral vision back she got around much better.

If we were home and could watch her continuously, we'd take the collar
off for a while - but as soon as she tried to mess with her injury, it
went back on (and of course if we left the house it was on). She
learned pretty fast.

Good luck with your kitty, I hope she's feeling better soon!

jmc

jmc

cybercat
December 27th 09, 02:25 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Hi All:
>
> This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female
> Main Coon, and for me as well.
>
> Christmas eve Tania started bleeding from her vagina. I took her
> immediately to VERG [http://www.vetemergencyreferral.com] Xrays,
> ultrasound, and blood tests revealed her uterus was infected, and a Spay
> operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the
> director of the hospital.

Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?

Seafire[_2_]
December 27th 09, 03:04 AM
cybercat wrote:

>
> Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?
>
>

Because I don't believe in mutilating animals. She is a house cat,
always in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle
during those times.

Bob

Mark Earnest
December 27th 09, 03:08 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?
>
> Because I don't believe in mutilating animals. She is a house cat, always
> in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle during
> those times.

What do you do when the male cats come around and she detects them, and goes
into her mating drives?

I had a feral cat that did that, and she tore things up to get to the male
cats, so I had to put her back out.

cybercat
December 27th 09, 05:15 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>>
>> Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?
>
> Because I don't believe in mutilating animals. She is a house cat, always
> in. I will miss her estrus' she was the most loving and gentle during
> those times.
>

You're a complete ****ing idiot. Bye now.

Phil P.
December 27th 09, 06:50 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
> >
> > Why hadn't you had this cat spayed?
> >
> >
>
> Because I don't believe in mutilating animals.

Do you know why your cat had pyometra, Einstein? Because you *didn't* get
her spayed. Your silly belief almost cost your cat her life. When a
female cat is in estrus, the mucous membrane that lines the uterus (the
endometrium) is constantly exposed to high concentrations of estrogen and
then even higher concentrations of progesterone. If she doesn't get
pregenant, cystic endometrial hyperplasia can develop. CEH predisposes the
uterus to bacterial infection followed by the production and accumulation of
pus- which can cause the uterus to rupture- which can cause death due to
sepsis or organ failure if not treated immediately. You're *very* lucky she
had open-cervix pyometra because the vaginal discharge alerted you in time
before the uterus ruptured. If the cervix was closed, you wouldn't have
seen a discharge and the only signs you would have seen were coma followed
by death.
Spaying a cat with pyometra is 100x more risky than a normal spay becuse the
pus-filled uterus can easily rupture during surgery. Once again your silly
belief exposed your cat to a very serious and unnecessary risk.

This a normal feline uterus
http://maxshouse.com/Feline_Reproduction/feline_uterus.jpg

This is uterus with pyometra
http://maxshouse.com/Feline_Reproduction/Pyometra.jpg

The danger didn't end with the spay. She's also at very high risk of
developing mammary cancer. Cats spayed after 2.5 years old have a risk or
incident rate 7 times higher than cats spayed before the first cycle. Most
tumors occur in cats 9-11 years of age and are found primarily in the
breasts closer to the tail. So, you better check her breasts very
frequently.



She is a house cat,
> always in. I will miss her estrus'

She definitely won't miss estrus. Estrus is not a fun time for female cats.



she was the most loving and gentle
> during those times.

She was also extremely uncomfortable.

Seafire[_2_]
December 27th 09, 07:25 AM
Mark Earnest wrote:

>
> What do you do when the male cats come around and she detects them, and goes
> into her mating drives?

We live on a yacht. The only animal which has come on deck has been a
raccoon. In the 13 years I have had Tania, I have never had a problem.
She never tore anything up, except for me a few times.

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 27th 09, 08:16 AM
Kelly Greene wrote:
>
>
> Do you consider women who get hysterectomies "mutilated?"

Only if the hysterectomy is performed for no good medical reason. They
used to be performed as a matter of course. In those instances, where
there is no indication of disease, yes, it's mutilation.

> Unspayed
> animals are prone to pyometra, a deadly infection and breast cancer.

This I didn't know. I have had several cats in my long life, but all
came spayed or neutered. Tania came literally off Manhattan streets as a
wild feral animal. It took a full year of her living with me before I
could approach her without needing stitches. I am the only human she
will allow near her. She had to be wrapped in a towel and sedated so she
could be examined the other day. It's always a dangerous proposition
bringing her to the vet for her check ups and shots, so I do it only
when required.

Thanks for the info!

Now, if I can figure out how this poor cat is going to eat and drink
with this cone over her head, and her wobbling around on unsteady legs,
I will feel better. I have to give her pain meds in the morning and
evening, it's oral, but they set up several syringes pre-measured so all
I have to do is shoot it into her mouth. Then once a day she gets
antibiotics, also pre-measured in syringes. All tis is doable, but 14
days in that cone seems like a dangerous proposition.

Bob


Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 27th 09, 08:28 AM
Phil P. wrote:
> You're *very* lucky she
> had open-cervix pyometra because the vaginal discharge alerted you in time
> before the uterus ruptured.

Thanks Interesting information. She had started with what appeared to be
a normal estrus. Except there was a bloody discharge.


> The danger didn't end with the spay. She's also at very high risk of
> developing mammary cancer. ..... So, you better check her breasts very
> frequently.

OK. She gets her belly rubs frequently, and I know where all her breasts
are. They normally enlarge a bit during estrus. What should I look for
as a bad sign?

> She was also extremely uncomfortable.
>

I honestly don't think she ever was. I am very in tune with her, and I
know when there is something amiss.

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 27th 09, 08:55 AM
I just took these with my cell phone. Does that cone look too big or not??

http://picasaweb.google.com/richard.robert/TaniaCone#

Bob

cl
December 27th 09, 09:25 AM
Seafire wrote:

> She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her
> stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't
> allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a
> drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some
> small cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with water.


I think that is the correct idea. Elevate food and water bowls a bit so
she can get to the food and water before the cone hits the ground. I
looked at the pictures of the cone and the cone does not look too big. I
think elevating water and food bowls three maybe four inches should
work. It might take a bit of training lifting the cup/bowl to her mouth.
But I think she should adapt quickly with or without that. It might be
possible for the vet to put vet wrap or a bandage over the sutures to
keep her from licking the area. In any case if she does not eat or drink
today the vet needs to be called for advice. Perhaps taking the collar
off for short periods to eat/drink will work.

Phil P.
December 27th 09, 09:42 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
>
> Now, if I can figure out how this poor cat is going to eat and drink
> with this cone over her head,

Get a small or extra small inflatable ProCollar - about $15. Its an
inflatable donut instead of a cone and gives her head and neck more mobility
than a cone but still restricts her from biting herself. Raise her food and
water bowls a few inches- about the width of the donut. Place the bowls on
the edge of whatever you're using to raise them. You'll know how to
position the bowls by how far she can bend her neck. ProCollars work great -
I use them all the time.

Here's what it looks like: http://tinyurl.com/6jmrhf

Phil P.
December 27th 09, 09:53 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. wrote:
> > You're *very* lucky she
> > had open-cervix pyometra because the vaginal discharge alerted you in
time
> > before the uterus ruptured.
>
> Thanks Interesting information. She had started with what appeared to be
> a normal estrus. Except there was a bloody discharge.
>
>
> > The danger didn't end with the spay. She's also at very high risk of
> > developing mammary cancer. ..... So, you better check her breasts very
> > frequently.
>
> OK. She gets her belly rubs frequently, and I know where all her breasts
> are. They normally enlarge a bit during estrus. What should I look for
> as a bad sign?

Round, smooth and encapsulated lumps or an irregular mass spreading into
adjacent tissues. If she develops a lump- regardless how small- get her to a
vet immediately if not sooner. 80-90% are malignant.


>
> > She was also extremely uncomfortable.
> >
>
> I honestly don't think she ever was.


She was. Trust me.

jmc
December 27th 09, 02:42 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Seafire exclaimed (12/27/2009 3:28 AM):
> Phil P. wrote:

>> She was also extremely uncomfortable.
>>
>
> I honestly don't think she ever was. I am very in tune with her, and I
> know when there is something amiss.
>
> Bob
>
Cats hide very well that they are sick - often until it was too late.

My neighbor's old dog got pyometria, and they wouldn't take her to the
vet because - get this! - she might be too sick and put her to sleep!
The poor dog was whining and howling nearly constantly. She was
obviously in pain.

I had a talk with the owner - non accusatory, very cordial, though I
really wanted to slap her - and they took her to the vet that day
(please note, she didn't have a discharge yet but was already in a lot
of pain). Lo and behold, the vet didn't put her to sleep, and she
survived. I don't remember if they gave her a hysterectomy or not.

I hope your cat is feeling better soon. As I suggested earlier, a clear
collar might work better for her than the usual opaque ones from the vet.

jmc

jmc
December 27th 09, 02:46 PM
Suddenly, without warning, cl exclaimed (12/27/2009 4:25 AM):
> Seafire wrote:
>
>> She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her
>> stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't
>> allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a
>> drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some
>> small cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with
>> water.
>
>
> I think that is the correct idea. Elevate food and water bowls a bit so
> she can get to the food and water before the cone hits the ground. I
> looked at the pictures of the cone and the cone does not look too big. I
> think elevating water and food bowls three maybe four inches should
> work. It might take a bit of training lifting the cup/bowl to her mouth.
> But I think she should adapt quickly with or without that. It might be
> possible for the vet to put vet wrap or a bandage over the sutures to
> keep her from licking the area. In any case if she does not eat or drink
> today the vet needs to be called for advice. Perhaps taking the collar
> off for short periods to eat/drink will work.

Oh, sorry, I missed the clear bit. Definitely, what cl said. As for vet
wrap, some cats leave it alone... mine had the cone because she wouldn't.

The only thing in looking at the picture of the cone she has - does it
flex at all? It almost looks solid.

jmc

Kelly Greene
December 27th 09, 05:24 PM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Hi All:
>
>
> I am concerened about her not seemingly being able to eat and drink with
> this thing on. She has to wear this for 14 days, then return to the
> hospital to have the stitches removed.
>
> Any ideas???
>
> TIA
> Bob

I'm clueless as to why they put a collar on her for 14 days?!?!?!?! I just
had Zephyr spayed and they used internal sutures and skin glue. There were
no sutures for her to pull out. Your kitty needs nourishment. Perhaps take
the collar off so she can eat and drink - then put it back on.

PanixNews
December 27th 09, 05:32 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...

> Get a small or extra small inflatable ProCollar - about $15.

Went to Petco, and bought the "small" Pro Collar as the extra small looked
way too small. It was $28.00 here in NY

It took a bit of struggle getting it on her, having to first feed her every
day collar through the hoops, and then fasten it to fighting Tania. Not too
much of my blood was spilled I suspect because I administered her pain meds
just before I did it, and they tend to calm her down.

She is much happier, can negotiate the stairs, and even got up onto her
slumber ball in the Pilot House.

http://picasaweb.google.com/richard.robert/TaniaCone#5419964702839340770

Doesn't that look more comfortable???

> You'll know how to
> position the bowls by how far she can bend her neck.

Well, she can now reach her bowls which I elevated to the height of the
doughnut thickness. She doesn't seem interested in either food or water.
Worrying! The cone is no longer an excuse. She is much more active today.
Yesterday she could not jump to the sofa, and was wobbly on her feet, today
she went all the way up to her perch. I also got a good look at her
stitches, they look fine, not as bad as I had imagined.

THANKS!! That Pro Collar is much better. Wonder why they don't offer that
as an option at the hospital? I mean, that place is not cheap. $2300.00 +
the take home meds, and you get a plastic cone.

Bob

--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger
of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini

Seafire[_2_]
December 28th 09, 04:01 AM
jmc wrote:

> The only thing in looking at the picture of the cone she has - does it
> flex at all? It almost looks solid.
>

It was solid. No flex at all. With the Pro Collar, she was able to climb
stairs, and even get into her basket and her slumber ball.

Bob

Mark Earnest
December 28th 09, 06:51 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Mark Earnest wrote:
>
>>
>> What do you do when the male cats come around and she detects them, and
>> goes into her mating drives?
>
> We live on a yacht. The only animal which has come on deck has been a
> raccoon. In the 13 years I have had Tania, I have never had a problem. She
> never tore anything up, except for me a few times.
>
> Bob

On a boat may be the only way to keep unfixed female cats from going crazy
over the tomcats. You've solved the problem. I just hope she doesn't get
sea sick, as cats seem to when they get with you in the car.

Mark

Bill Graham
December 28th 09, 08:01 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Hi All:
>
> This has been a terrible two days for Tania, my 13 year old feral female
> Main Coon, and for me as well.
>
> Christmas eve Tania started bleeding from her vagina. I took her
> immediately to VERG [http://www.vetemergencyreferral.com] Xrays,
> ultrasound, and blood tests revealed her uterus was infected, and a Spay
> operation was needed. It was performed yesterday, Christmas day by the
> director of the hospital.
>
> I just brought her home. She is so happy! I was expecting that she would
> attack me, but she is being very sweet, wanting to sit in my lap.
>
> She has this clear plastic cone collar on so she can't get to her
> stitches. The problem is that she can't eat because the collar doesn't
> allow her to dip her head the way she is used to. Also, she has a
> drinkwell fountain, and of course can't reach the water. I put some small
> cups, cups smaller than the opening in her collar, filled with water.
>
> Will she learn how to get around the impediment? Or should I see if there
> is a smaller collar available? She is wobbly on her feet, bumping into
> things, can't jump to her favorite places....
>
> I am concerened about her not seemingly being able to eat and drink with
> this thing on. She has to wear this for 14 days, then return to the
> hospital to have the stitches removed.
>
> Any ideas???
>
> TIA
> Bob

Yes....Take it off and watch her eat and drink a couple of times a day, and
then, put it back on......

Phil P.
December 28th 09, 08:42 AM
"PanixNews" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
>
> > Get a small or extra small inflatable ProCollar - about $15.
>
> Went to Petco, and bought the "small" Pro Collar as the extra small looked
> way too small. It was $28.00 here in NY
>
> It took a bit of struggle getting it on her, having to first feed her
every
> day collar through the hoops, and then fasten it to fighting Tania. Not
too
> much of my blood was spilled I suspect because I administered her pain
meds
> just before I did it, and they tend to calm her down.
>
> She is much happier, can negotiate the stairs, and even got up onto her
> slumber ball in the Pilot House.
>
> http://picasaweb.google.com/richard.robert/TaniaCone#5419964702839340770
>
> Doesn't that look more comfortable???


You don't have to inflate the Pro Collar all the way- about half way is good
enough. She still won't be able to get at her stiches and it'll be much more
comfortable for her. If you inflate it only about half way, the Pro Collar
will be also act like a soft pillow when she sleeps.



>
> > You'll know how to
> > position the bowls by how far she can bend her neck.
>
> Well, she can now reach her bowls which I elevated to the height of the
> doughnut thickness. She doesn't seem interested in either food or water.
> Worrying! The cone is no longer an excuse. She is much more active today.
> Yesterday she could not jump to the sofa, and was wobbly on her feet,
today
> she went all the way up to her perch. I also got a good look at her
> stitches, they look fine, not as bad as I had imagined.
>
> THANKS!! That Pro Collar is much better. Wonder why they don't offer that
> as an option at the hospital? I mean, that place is not cheap. $2300.00 +
> the take home meds, and you get a plastic cone.

Spay surgeries are usually more expensive if the cat has pyometra. The
surgery is much more dangerous and takes longer because the surgeon has to
be very careful not to rupture the uterus while he's removing it. Plus
emergencies are always more expensive than a scheduled procedure. VERG is
expensive but its a good hospital. I know the place. For a high-risk
surgery such as Tania's, you went to the right place.

I hope you've learned something from this experience and you'll get your
future cats spayed and neutered. Its not only about preventing pregnancies-
its about saving your cats' lives. You were very lucky this time. Next time
you might not be so lucky.

Good luck,

Phil

Seafire[_2_]
December 28th 09, 04:30 PM
Phil P. wrote:

> .... VERG is
> expensive but its a good hospital. I know the place. For a high-risk
> surgery such as Tania's, you went to the right place.

I was very impressed with the professionalism and kindness of the staff.
Very up front about diagnosis, treatment, and cost. They are available
24/7 365 days a year. Tania was admitted on Christmas eve, and operated
on Christmas day. The discharge interview was thorough, as was the
discharge report:
http://picasaweb.google.com/richard.robert/TaniaCone#5420319157150340514


> I hope you've learned something from this experience and you'll get your
> future cats spayed and neutered.

I think Tania is going to be my last animal companion. I am 62, and I
don't believe it's fair for a pet to outlive it's person. Despite what
has happened here, my animals are well loved and cared for, they are
family to me, not "pets". The answer is yes, IF I have the pleasure of
another cat in my life, he/she will be "fixed" as soon as they move in.

Thanks for the help, education, and support you folks have given me
during this very difficult time. In many ways, this has been harder than
the hard times I have had with my children.

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 28th 09, 06:02 PM
Mark Earnest wrote:

> I just hope she doesn't get
> sea sick, as cats seem to when they get with you in the car.
>

No. Tania is a real NautiCat. She was perfectly fine during my longest
cruise from the San Juan Islands of Washington State to NYC. A 12 month
cruise down the Pacific, across the Gulf, and up the Atlantic, which saw
very heavy seas at times. Seasickness in humans is genetic, it must be
in cats as well. The Tan and I must have the non-seasick gene, motion
doesn't bother either of us. Good thing, as even here at the dock we can
rock a lot at times of heavy wind.

Bob

Mark Earnest
December 29th 09, 02:02 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Mark Earnest wrote:
>
>> I just hope she doesn't get sea sick, as cats seem to when they get with
>> you in the car.
>>
>
> No. Tania is a real NautiCat. She was perfectly fine during my longest
> cruise from the San Juan Islands of Washington State to NYC. A 12 month
> cruise down the Pacific, across the Gulf, and up the Atlantic, which saw
> very heavy seas at times. Seasickness in humans is genetic, it must be in
> cats as well. The Tan and I must have the non-seasick gene, motion doesn't
> bother either of us. Good thing, as even here at the dock we can rock a
> lot at times of heavy wind.

And then you had to get home...
Oh, that's right, the ocean is your home!
Your residence is the whole world, just like
it is for us on the Internet.

Mark

starcat
December 29th 09, 02:48 AM
>
> I think Tania is going to be my last animal companion. I am 62, and I
> don't believe it's fair for a pet to outlive it's person. Despite what has
> happened here, my animals are well loved and cared for, they are family to
> me, not "pets". The answer is yes, IF I have the pleasure of another cat
> in my life, he/she will be "fixed" as soon as they move in.
>
> Thanks for the help, education, and support you folks have given me during
> this very difficult time. In many ways, this has been harder than the hard
> times I have had with my children.
>
> Bob

I've had cats all my life, and I often think how I wouldn't want to outlive
mine, so I know how you feel. But I've also thought when the time came that
I could adopt an older cat, rather than a young one or a kitten. Or even
fostering, which likely wouldn't work for a seafarer like yourself. It's
just hard for me to imagine any part of my life not shared with a feline.

Your Tania is gorgeous - a real beauty.

Seafire[_2_]
December 30th 09, 03:15 AM
Kelly Greene wrote:

>
> Where are you docked now?
>

Mill Basin Brooklyn NY. The Marina behind the Kings Plaza Mall.

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 30th 09, 03:27 AM
starcat wrote:

> I could adopt an older cat, rather than a young one or a kitten.

That's an option. But, watching a kitten grow up and mature into a
little tiger is a real joy.

> It's
> just hard for me to imagine any part of my life not shared with a feline.

I have had dogs and cats, together at times. In more recent years I
lived in a Manhattan apartment and worked a hectic job, so cats were the
thing. With Tania, I have come to enjoy cats more than any other animal.
There is something special with felines.

>
> Your Tania is gorgeous - a real beauty.

Yes she is.

She is here beside me sleeping, she wants to be close to me all the
time. She has been drinking some but not eating yet. Still wobbly on her
feet day three after her surgery.

Bob

dgk
December 30th 09, 01:24 PM
On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 22:15:12 -0500, Seafire >
wrote:

>Kelly Greene wrote:
>
>>
>> Where are you docked now?
>>
>
>Mill Basin Brooklyn NY. The Marina behind the Kings Plaza Mall.
>
>Bob

What do you do if you are the cats get sick while you're out at sea? I
guess the coast guard or something can fly in a doctor. Would they
send a vet?

Seafire[_2_]
December 30th 09, 03:24 PM
dgk wrote:

> What do you do if you are the cats get sick while you're out at sea?

Health issues are a risk one takes when doing this sort of thing. Not
just for Tania, but for me as well. There is a certain amount of
isolation involved. I have emergency medical kits aboard, for both
humans and cats, however, as you can imagine, they may be of limited use.

> guess the coast guard or something can fly in a doctor. Would they
> send a vet?

No. Likely they would evacuate me, and abandon both the boat and Tania.
In the worse case, there would be little chance of survival as I would
never leave her.

Bob

jmc
December 30th 09, 04:53 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Kelly Greene exclaimed (12/27/2009 2:08 PM):
>
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
> I don't remember if they gave her a hysterectomy or not.
>>
>
> If she had pyo, it was the only way to save her. All female animals not
> purebred and intended for breeding should be spayed for their own safely.

Oh, I completely and utterly agree!

At that point though I was just trying to get the owner to do the right
thing, and find out why she was in such pain. At the time I didn't know
anything about the dog, her age, or that she wasn't spayed... I just
knew that she was being left out in the cold because she was whining too
much (!). That sort of mindset boggles my mind (she's whining in pain
so we're gonna throw her outside rather than take her to the vet,
because she might be so sick the vet'll have to put her to sleep. GAAAH!)

They shouldn't have animals but being accusatory would have likely
caused them to do nothing, and been a death sentence for the dog.

jmc

cybercat
December 30th 09, 11:11 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 29 Dec 2009 22:15:12 -0500, Seafire >
> wrote:
>
>>Kelly Greene wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> Where are you docked now?
>>>
>>
>>Mill Basin Brooklyn NY. The Marina behind the Kings Plaza Mall.
>>
>>Bob
>
> What do you do if you are the cats get sick while you're out at sea? I
> guess the coast guard or something can fly in a doctor. Would they
> send a vet?

:) I'm imagining that conversation.

Seafire[_2_]
December 31st 09, 02:57 AM
cybercat wrote:

>
> :) I'm imagining that conversation.
>

This is funny. Been there done that! While crossing the Gulf of Mexico
one time I encountered a very severe storm; water spouts, hurricane
force winds, and lethal lightening. So severe that I called the Coasties
on radio and requested to be put on "watch". Meaning I would check in
with them by radio every hour, giving them position course and speed so
that if I was not heard from they would know approximately where to look
for me, or my body.

Of course, they asked me "How many souls on board" Knowing Tania, I
answered TWO. Me and Tania Braveheart (they never specified how many
HUMAN souls). We made it through the storm OK, but I can just imagine
what would have happened if they had found us adrift, and started
looking for a Tania Braveheart. It would have made the local papers I am
sure.

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 31st 09, 03:15 AM
jmc wrote:

>
> Good luck with your kitty, I hope she's feeling better soon!
>
> jmc

Today, finally, four days after the surgery, Tania is EATING AND
DRINKING. I think I have my Tania back, alive and sort of well.....

She has a nice soft half-inflated pro-collar for a pillow, she is
herself again, eating, drinking and loving, and being my friend again. I
have my friend back. Oh JOY! This has been horrible, but I think I have
my friend back. I am starting to feel happy again.

All I can do is kiss, cuddle and love her..... Oh joy! Tania seems to be
back.

Eleven more days, and she can have her stitches and collar removed. This
calls for a cruise south to warmer climes!!!!

Bob

Seafire[_2_]
December 31st 09, 03:37 AM
Mark Earnest wrote:

> Your residence is the whole world, just like
> it is for us on the Internet.
>


es Mark, but with that physical component intact. Tania is my connection
with physical reality. She is on the mend!!!

Bob

Mark Earnest
December 31st 09, 04:11 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Mark Earnest wrote:
>
>> Your residence is the whole world, just like
>> it is for us on the Internet.
>>
>
>
> es Mark, but with that physical component intact. Tania is my connection
> with physical reality. She is on the mend!!!

I know what you mean. For a long time my Siamese Fighting Fish was my
contact with the real world. Now it is my adolescent female cat,
"Avalanche." I don't really contact human beings that much either but when
it happens, it makes up for lost time.

Glad your cat is doing better.

Mark Earnest
January 1st 10, 08:10 AM
"Seafire" > wrote in message
...
> Phil P. wrote:
>
>> .... VERG is
>> expensive but its a good hospital. I know the place. For a high-risk
>> surgery such as Tania's, you went to the right place.
>
> I was very impressed with the professionalism and kindness of the staff.
> Very up front about diagnosis, treatment, and cost. They are available
> 24/7 365 days a year. Tania was admitted on Christmas eve, and operated on
> Christmas day. The discharge interview was thorough, as was the discharge
> report:
> http://picasaweb.google.com/richard.robert/TaniaCone#5420319157150340514
>
>
>> I hope you've learned something from this experience and you'll get your
>> future cats spayed and neutered.
>
> I think Tania is going to be my last animal companion. I am 62, and I
> don't believe it's fair for a pet to outlive it's person.

Get a dynasty of gerbils or hamsters.
It's hard to outlive those.

starcat
January 1st 10, 07:51 PM
"Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> Get a dynasty of gerbils or hamsters.
> It's hard to outlive those.

You're right about that - those guys are lucky to live more than a year or
so. I used to also have pet mice when I was in high school, which were kept
in a room away from the cats, of course. Those little babies never lived
very long, but they were lots of fun. Not as much fun as cats, though.
Nothing can replace a purring cat.

Mark Earnest
January 2nd 10, 05:28 AM
"starcat" > wrote in message
m...
>
> "Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
> .. .
>>
>> Get a dynasty of gerbils or hamsters.
>> It's hard to outlive those.
>
> You're right about that - those guys are lucky to live more than a year or
> so. I used to also have pet mice when I was in high school, which were
> kept in a room away from the cats, of course. Those little babies never
> lived very long, but they were lots of fun. Not as much fun as cats,
> though. Nothing can replace a purring cat.

Unfortuately for me, I loved both gerbils and cats at the same time.
You can surely guess what happened to the gerbils. :)