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MLB[_2_]
January 4th 10, 06:04 PM
Allan Smith wrote:
> Kelly,
>
> There is one other possibility, an allergy to gluten. I have one that has
> the problem. If she is fed anything with wheat in it - run for the exits. I
> use canned food, but am very careful to avoid corn, wheat, barley, and rye
> in her foods. Rice is ok, as it contains no gluten. Oats don't seem to
> bother her.
>
> In humans, the autoimmune form is called Celiac Sprue, and info is here.
> https://health.google.com/health/ref/Celiac+disease+-+sprue
>
> Wild cats do get a tiny bit of grains. It's in the stomachs of their prey.
>
> But I never saw a cat stalk, kill, and eat an ear of corn.
>
> Allan
>



I wish you could have seen Ginger (a very large orange tabby) attack an
ear of corn. He ate it down the row like people do. Memories: that
was long ago. Best wishes. MLB

Allan Smith
January 4th 10, 10:05 PM
MLB,

Was he a diabetic? Most such cats lapse into a coma at the end.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"MLB" > wrote in message
...
> Allan Smith wrote:
>> Kelly,
>>
>> There is one other possibility, an allergy to gluten. I have one that has
>> the problem. If she is fed anything with wheat in it - run for the exits.
>> I use canned food, but am very careful to avoid corn, wheat, barley, and
>> rye in her foods. Rice is ok, as it contains no gluten. Oats don't seem
>> to bother her.
>>
>> In humans, the autoimmune form is called Celiac Sprue, and info is here.
>> https://health.google.com/health/ref/Celiac+disease+-+sprue
>>
>> Wild cats do get a tiny bit of grains. It's in the stomachs of their
>> prey.
>>
>> But I never saw a cat stalk, kill, and eat an ear of corn.
>>
>> Allan
>>
>
>
>
> I wish you could have seen Ginger (a very large orange tabby) attack an
> ear of corn. He ate it down the row like people do. Memories: that was
> long ago. Best wishes. MLB

January 5th 10, 10:35 AM
On Jan 4, 10:04*am, MLB > wrote:
> Allan Smith wrote:
> > Kelly,
>
> > There is one other possibility, an allergy to gluten. I have one that has
> > the problem. If she is fed anything with wheat in it - run for the exits. I
> > use canned food, but am very careful to avoid corn, wheat, barley, and rye
> > in her foods. Rice is ok, as it contains no gluten. Oats don't seem to
> > bother her.
>
> > In humans, the autoimmune form is called Celiac Sprue, and info is here..
> >https://health.google.com/health/ref/Celiac+disease+-+sprue
>
> > Wild cats do get a tiny bit of grains. It's in the stomachs of their prey.
>
> > But I never saw a cat stalk, kill, and eat an ear of corn.
>
> > Allan
>
> I wish you could have seen Ginger (a very large orange tabby) attack an
> ear of corn. *He ate it down the row like people do. *Memories: *that
> was long ago. *Best wishes. * MLB

We've has several cats that loved corn. Duffy also loved broccoli.
Maynard loved peas and mushrooms more than tuna and chicken. He also
loved cantaloupe, Lima beans, corn, carrots, snow peas, pasta, blue
cheese dressing, and a bunch more. Kira loved carrots. We gave a
carrot to the dog for a snack, and I found Kira dragging it around and
trying to eat it.

Allan Smith
January 6th 10, 11:14 AM
MLB,

There are many things a cat will eat as it mimics the humans and dogs around
them. Like children, they 'learn' form thier 'parents'. While vegetables
aren't normally much of a problem, gluten-grains can be another matter
entirely, just as with humans.

Corn is not usually a gluten-problem, but it is one of the highest-glycemic
foods around, quickly spikes the blood glucose, and many believe it can
contribute to diabetes later in a cat's life. I think it best avoided.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"MLB" > wrote in message
...
> Allan Smith wrote:
>> Kelly,
>>
>> There is one other possibility, an allergy to gluten. I have one that has
>> the problem. If she is fed anything with wheat in it - run for the exits.
>> I use canned food, but am very careful to avoid corn, wheat, barley, and
>> rye in her foods. Rice is ok, as it contains no gluten. Oats don't seem
>> to bother her.
>>
>> In humans, the autoimmune form is called Celiac Sprue, and info is here.
>> https://health.google.com/health/ref/Celiac+disease+-+sprue
>>
>> Wild cats do get a tiny bit of grains. It's in the stomachs of their
>> prey.
>>
>> But I never saw a cat stalk, kill, and eat an ear of corn.
>>
>> Allan
>>
>
>
>
> I wish you could have seen Ginger (a very large orange tabby) attack an
> ear of corn. He ate it down the row like people do. Memories: that was
> long ago. Best wishes. MLB

Bill Graham
January 8th 10, 01:08 AM
"Kelly Green" > wrote in message
. com...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> MLB,
>>
>> There are many things a cat will eat as it mimics the humans and dogs
>> around them. Like children, they 'learn' form thier 'parents'. While
>> vegetables aren't normally much of a problem, gluten-grains can be
>> another
>> matter entirely, just as with humans.
>>
>> Corn is not usually a gluten-problem, but it is one of the
>> highest-glycemic foods around, quickly spikes the blood glucose, and many
>> believe it can contribute to diabetes later in a cat's life. I think it
>> best avoided.
>>
>
> Us humans are also eating way too many foods that spike our blood glucose.
> Look at the rate of obesity and diabetes in the US population. Our pets
> are
> following in our footsteps. :(


Although I frequently try, I cannot get my cats to eat anything that is not
meat.Sometimes Meggie will nibble at a piece of cake or doughnut, but she
seldom eats more that a fraction of an ounce of it, and the rest of them
won't even do that......They are hopelessly hooked on meat.

Allan Smith
January 8th 10, 12:20 PM
Bill,

Since cats are true carnivores, not omnivores like humans and dogs, it isn't
surprising they prefer meat. As for cake, cats cannot taste sweet, so you
might as well try to get them to eat bread. They might have a slight
preference for some cakes over bread, but it is likely due to a higher
butter content, not sugar.

Quite simply, if an animal's ancestral diet does not include fruits, there
is no need for it to difeferentiate sweet, sour, and bitter. You can test
this by offering your cat a half-teaspoon of vinegar-containing liquid,
shuch as the juice from bottled olives or dill pickles, Most will drink it
for the acetate, not even tasting the sourness. Some will drink straight
vinegar.

In the wild, cats doen't eat grains, except those in the stomach of their
prey. Their metabolic process is finely tuned to a diet of small animals and
insects, i.e., high protein, some fats, but very low carbohydrates.
Commercial cat foods often use grains as a 'filler' to increse volume and
reduce production cost. Normally rather harmless in small quantities, too
much can lead to obesity, particularly in spayed females, and to changes in
urine chemistry and crystals, a particular probelm for neutered males.

And, like one of mine, gluten-containing grains can create serious problems
with Celiac Sprue.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Kelly Green" > wrote in message
> . com...
>>
>> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> MLB,
>>>

Bill Graham
January 8th 10, 08:40 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Bill,
>
> Since cats are true carnivores, not omnivores like humans and dogs, it
> isn't surprising they prefer meat. As for cake, cats cannot taste sweet,
> so you might as well try to get them to eat bread. They might have a
> slight preference for some cakes over bread, but it is likely due to a
> higher butter content, not sugar.
>
> Quite simply, if an animal's ancestral diet does not include fruits, there
> is no need for it to difeferentiate sweet, sour, and bitter. You can test
> this by offering your cat a half-teaspoon of vinegar-containing liquid,
> shuch as the juice from bottled olives or dill pickles, Most will drink it
> for the acetate, not even tasting the sourness. Some will drink straight
> vinegar.
>
> In the wild, cats doen't eat grains, except those in the stomach of their
> prey. Their metabolic process is finely tuned to a diet of small animals
> and insects, i.e., high protein, some fats, but very low carbohydrates.
> Commercial cat foods often use grains as a 'filler' to increse volume and
> reduce production cost. Normally rather harmless in small quantities, too
> much can lead to obesity, particularly in spayed females, and to changes
> in urine chemistry and crystals, a particular probelm for neutered males.
>
> And, like one of mine, gluten-containing grains can create serious
> problems with Celiac Sprue.
>
> Allan

Yes, they seem to like butter, and our vet says small amounts of it are good
for them because it helps prevent them from accumulating hair balls. She
does like to lick the butter cream frosting on cakes and doughnuts too. I
had one years ago who would eat canned fish that was packed in hot
sauce......I liked it, and whenever I ate it, she would hop up on the table
and ask for some......The hot sauce didn't seem to bother her at all, so I
don't think she could taste it Since hot peppers are not on a carnivore's
regular diet, I can understand why they may not be able to taste them.

Allan Smith
January 8th 10, 09:00 PM
Bill,

>Since hot peppers are not on a carnivore's regular diet, I can understand
>why they may not be able to taste them.

Yep, I was quite surprised to find out long ago that one of mine liked
pickled jalapenos that were so hot I couldn't eat them. She was after the
vinegar, and the jalapeno heat wasn't going to get in her way. But even when
given a choice between green olives and jalapenos, she preferred the
jalapenos. Unless you pulled the pimento out of the olive. She'd go for the
pimento before the jalapenos.

Oh well, she _was_ after all, a cat.

"Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and
get used to the idea."
- Robert Heinlein

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Bill,
>>
>> Since cats are true carnivores, not omnivores like humans and dogs, it
>> isn't surprising they prefer meat. As for cake, cats cannot taste sweet,

Lesley[_3_]
January 10th 10, 03:45 PM
On Jan 8, 12:40*pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
.. I
> had one years ago who would eat canned fish that was packed in hot
> sauce......I liked it, and whenever I ate it, she would hop up on the table
> and ask for some......The hot sauce didn't seem to bother her at all,

Fugazi (RB) liked lamb doner kebabs with chilli sauce- the hotter the
better but she only liked the chilli sauce- she;d lick the meat clean
and leave it.

Dave was once eating a sheek kebab from our local takeaway- these
things are very hot- about the limit of his tolerance and miles above
mine- he put his plate down for a second and Sarrasine who usually
never shows much interest in Hoomin food suddenly snatched the last
bit off the plate and ran off with it. We expected at very least a
lot of feline cursing and a bolt to the water dish but she sat there
chewing on it and afterwards did the whole lip licking and washing
routine that she does whenever she has something nice to eat

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

cybercat
January 10th 10, 07:05 PM
"Lesley" > wrote
>- he put his plate down for a second and Sarrasine who usually
>never shows much interest in Hoomin food suddenly snatched the last
>bit off the plate and ran off with it. \\

This is funny. :)

Lesley[_3_]
January 10th 10, 07:08 PM
On Jan 10, 11:05*am, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
> This is funny. :)

She seemed very proud of getting it, Behold the mighty huntress with
her captured prey!

Lesley

Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

tanadashoes
January 10th 10, 11:04 PM
Lesley wrote:
> On Jan 10, 11:05 am, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>> This is funny. :)
>
> She seemed very proud of getting it, Behold the mighty huntress with
> her captured prey!
>
> Lesley
>
> Slave of the Fabulous Furballs

And I thought Guido, the brave olive hunter, was funny.

Pam S. laughing

Kelly Green[_3_]
January 16th 10, 11:53 PM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Kelly Green" > wrote in message
> . com...
>> Us humans are also eating way too many foods that spike our blood
>> glucose.
>> Look at the rate of obesity and diabetes in the US population. Our pets
>> are
>> following in our footsteps. :(
>
>
> Although I frequently try, I cannot get my cats to eat anything that is
> not meat.Sometimes Meggie will nibble at a piece of cake or doughnut, but
> she seldom eats more that a fraction of an ounce of it, and the rest of
> them won't even do that......They are hopelessly hooked on meat.

One of mine, adopted at around 9 months of age, was addicted to dry kibble.
Any kibble with canned food on it was ignored. It took over a month to
switch her to canned and raw. I still add a small amount of Wellness or
SolidGold but it's not really needed. When it's gone I'm not replacing it.
The younger one, barely 6 weeks old when we adopted them (together) ate
anything we put in her food bowl. :-) The older one would look at the
little one happily munching away on a raw chicken liver, some canned food, a
Wellness kibble or two, maybe a slice of raw beef..... and one day as we
watched her watch the baby, she reached over and started to nibble on the
baby's food. A BREAKTHROUGH!!! :-))) Since then she's enjoyed her meals of
ever increasing canned and raw meat over Wellness or SolidGold. She's no
longer addicted to dry Purina.

Bill Graham
January 17th 10, 02:00 AM
"Kelly Green" > wrote in message
. com...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Kelly Green" > wrote in message
>> . com...
>>> Us humans are also eating way too many foods that spike our blood
>>> glucose.
>>> Look at the rate of obesity and diabetes in the US population. Our pets
>>> are
>>> following in our footsteps. :(
>>
>>
>> Although I frequently try, I cannot get my cats to eat anything that is
>> not meat.Sometimes Meggie will nibble at a piece of cake or doughnut, but
>> she seldom eats more that a fraction of an ounce of it, and the rest of
>> them won't even do that......They are hopelessly hooked on meat.
>
> One of mine, adopted at around 9 months of age, was addicted to dry
> kibble. Any kibble with canned food on it was ignored. It took over a
> month to switch her to canned and raw. I still add a small amount of
> Wellness or SolidGold but it's not really needed. When it's gone I'm not
> replacing it.
> The younger one, barely 6 weeks old when we adopted them (together) ate
> anything we put in her food bowl. :-) The older one would look at the
> little one happily munching away on a raw chicken liver, some canned food,
> a Wellness kibble or two, maybe a slice of raw beef..... and one day as we
> watched her watch the baby, she reached over and started to nibble on the
> baby's food. A BREAKTHROUGH!!! :-))) Since then she's enjoyed her meals
> of ever increasing canned and raw meat over Wellness or SolidGold. She's
> no longer addicted to dry Purina.
>

I think it is very difficult to break the habits that a cat learns when it
is a kitten. It is programmed by millions of years of evolution to do what
it's mother teaches it for the rest of it's life. Our feral cat avoided us
for years. It would eat our food, sleep inside our house even, but let us
touch it? - No way!! Even to this day, it stiffens up when we pick it up,
and it routinely sleeps on our chest all night.

Bill Graham
January 21st 10, 11:40 PM
"Kelly Green" > wrote in message
. com...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Kelly Green" > wrote in message
> ..... and one day as we
>>> watched her watch the baby, she reached over and started to nibble on
>>> the baby's food. A BREAKTHROUGH!!! :-))) Since then she's enjoyed her
>>> meals of ever increasing canned and raw meat over Wellness or SolidGold.
>>> She's no longer addicted to dry Purina.
>>>
>>
>> I think it is very difficult to break the habits that a cat learns when
>> it is a kitten. It is programmed by millions of years of evolution to do
>> what it's mother teaches it for the rest of it's life. Our feral cat
>> avoided us for years. It would eat our food, sleep inside our house even,
>> but let us touch it? - No way!! Even to this day, it stiffens up when we
>> pick it up, and it routinely sleeps on our chest all night.
>
> This is so very true. I got these girls young enough to make the change
> without too much hassle to us both. The older one didn't seem to know
> what wet food was. Unfortunately she loves milk but gets the gassy-runs
> from it (lactose intolerance) so I give her cottage cheese a few times a
> week. Another treat they both go crazy for is canned mackerel and
> sardines. I read cats evolved in desert areas yet every cat I had since
> childhood loved fish and fishy canned foods. There was no fishing in the
> desert.
>
> Do you remember "Puss In Boots" fishy cat food? You could see the tiny
> fish bones in it. That was the brand my mother bought for the cats when I
> was a kid in the 1950s. She also gave them condensed milk.

Only my two males like milk. The feral one, (who probably learned to eat it
from garbage) and B-K, who learned to drink it in the Burger King parking
lot. B-K, would drink a glass of milk when I got him home, by sticking his
paw down in the glass, and then licking the milk from it after he took it
back out......Most cats will just knock over the glass and lap up what they
can before it all soaks into the ground. B-K can drink a whole glass of milk
without wasting a drop! I haven't tried giving them evaporated milk.....They
might like that. I suspect that's what you meant by "condensed" milk.
Condensed milk has way too much sugar in it for any of my cats.