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Nel
January 11th 10, 06:24 PM
Jan 11, 2010: Hello, question for folks; any input on what this issue could be? My daughter and her BF moved to an Apt, and they brought his 4yr female cat. Prior, the cat lived with the BF parents, while he was in college. Now, "Enzo" seems to be licking & pulling at her fur; my daughter reports tufts aroudn the apt and some bare spots starting.
They just took her to the Vet, and they have changed food (from MeowMix to something different), and even though she did not have fleas, they gave her "Advantage" flea topical medicine.
Any ideas what may cause her to do this, & 'solutions' (beside, "Get Her a Friend"...) Thanks...

cybercat
January 11th 10, 08:51 PM
"Nel" > wrote in message
...
>
> Jan 11, 2010: Hello, question for folks; any input on what this issue
> could be? My daughter and her BF moved to an Apt, and they brought his
> 4yr female cat. Prior, the cat lived with the BF parents, while he was
> in college. Now, "Enzo" seems to be licking & pulling at her fur; my
> daughter reports tufts aroudn the apt and some bare spots starting.
> They just took her to the Vet, and they have changed food (from MeowMix
> to something different), and even though she did not have fleas, they
> gave her "Advantage" flea topical medicine.
> Any ideas what may cause her to do this, & 'solutions' (beside, "Get
> Her a Friend"...) Thanks...
>
>
Nel, my cat does this when she is anxious. Just moving from one house to
another might do it, that is a big change for a cat. They need to give her
all the love and attention and routine they can. Vets are not usually good
at treating this anxiety-related stuff. What works for me is to figure out
what is making her anxious and try to fix it. Last time, our other cat was
coming into what Gracie saw as "her spot" every day, wanting to hang out
with me. I began visiting the other cat in another part of the house, and lo
and behold all the fur on Gracie's side grew back. Some stability might do
this for your daughter's cat. Good luck, and tell the kids to have patience
and be persistant, and not to see about medication until they try this.
People do put cats on prozac-like drugs, but I would only do this as a last
resort.

cybercat
January 11th 10, 09:48 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Nel,
>
> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
> The new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be that the
> former tennants moved away from them). For some cats, it only takes one
> single flea. Wait the flea medicine to work. Advantage is an excellent
> choice.
>
> Does your daughter have itchy lesions resembling mosquito bites,
> especially on the legs or lower torso?
>
> It is highly unlikely that a remakably-sudden food allergy is the cause,
> and it is also highly unlikely that stress is a factor. That is not the
> way cats react to stress.
>

Total horse ****. My cats are all indoors and have never had fleas. Get your
**** straight before you comment on things you know too little about.

cybercat
January 11th 10, 09:49 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Nel,
>
> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
> The new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be that the
> former tennants moved away from them). For some cats, it only takes one
> single flea. Wait the flea medicine to work. Advantage is an excellent
> choice.
>
> Does your daughter have itchy lesions resembling mosquito bites,
> especially on the legs or lower torso?
>
> It is highly unlikely that a remakably-sudden food allergy is the cause,
> and it is also highly unlikely that stress is a factor. That is not the
> way cats react to stress.
>

Did you read this part of Nel's post?

"and even though she did not have fleas, they gave her "Advantage" flea
topical medicine."

She needs help understanding why her cat is grooming compulsively even
though the cat DOES NOT HAVE FLEAS.

A little work on reading comprehension, maybe.

Allan Smith
January 11th 10, 10:06 PM
cybercat,

>Get your **** straight before you comment on things you know too little
>about.

Apartments are not houses. The Vet treated the problem appropriately. If you
don't like that, go after the Vet. Indoor cats certainly do get fleas,
especially if they are already there, which is typical of self-barbering on
entry of new quarters. And, you can bring them in on your clothes if you
garden or work in the yard in the warmer climates.

Why don't your research Psychogenic Alopecia before attacking the messenger?
You might start here on the list of priorities to rule-out in differential
doagnosis. Allergies are the last on the list. I noted the Vet did not
prescribe allergy treatments in the form of oral steroids - he simply took
action to rule out the first three differentials first.

http://www.petplace.com/cats/psychogenic-alopecia-in-cats/page1.aspx

Yours is called and "ad hominem" attack btw. A.k.a., shoot the messenger if
you don't like the message or if it is different from yours. Usually caused
by resentment of new information or knowledge. Otherwise known as a
"self-inflicted learning disability".

Get over your ego. Learn new things.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Nel,
>>
>> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
>> The new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be that the

cybercat
January 11th 10, 10:24 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat,
>
>>Get your **** straight before you comment on things you know too little
>>about.
>
> Apartments are not houses. The Vet treated the problem appropriately. If
> you don't like that, go after the Vet. Indoor cats certainly do get fleas,
> especially if they are already there, which is typical of self-barbering
> on entry of new quarters. And, you can bring them in on your clothes if
> you garden or work in the yard in the warmer climates.
>
> Why don't your research Psychogenic Alopecia before attacking the
> messenger? You might start here on the list of priorities to rule-out in
> differential doagnosis. Allergies are the last on the list. I noted the
> Vet did not prescribe allergy treatments in the form of oral steroids - he
> simply took action to rule out the first three differentials first.
>
> http://www.petplace.com/cats/psychogenic-alopecia-in-cats/page1.aspx
>
> Yours is called and "ad hominem" attack btw. A.k.a., shoot the messenger
> if you don't like the message or if it is different from yours. Usually
> caused by resentment of new information or knowledge. Otherwise known as a
> "self-inflicted learning disability".
>
> Get over your ego. Learn new things.
>

You're an idiot. Now *that* is an ad hominem attack. You stated that stress
is not a likely cause of the excessive grooming that causes fur loss. This
is horse ****. You just got here, but we've been discussing topics like
this--and this particular topic--for years.

---MIKE---
January 12th 10, 12:17 AM
About three years ago I spent a week in the hospital with Sepsis.
During that time Amber developed a bare spot on one side - probably due
to the stress of my not being there. The vet gave her a prednisone shot
and the fur grew back.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Allan Smith
January 12th 10, 12:22 AM
cyber,

> You're an idiot. Now *that* is an ad hominem attack.

No, it is not. You left out the message.

It is an attempt at deflection; a strawman.

> we've been discussing topics like this--and this particular topic--for
> years.

Where is "we"?

Or is that really just "you"?

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat,
>>
>>>Get your **** straight before you comment on things you know too little
>>>about.

Allan Smith
January 12th 10, 01:26 AM
Kelly,

> I've already received it. Nice company to do business with.

That's good to hear. I was impressed with their product lines and pleasantly
surprised at their promptness, and it is nice to hear it worked out well for
you. Thanks for the feedback.

> My girls and myself thank you again and again and again.............

You, and they, are most welcome. There is an old saying, "The difference
between dogs and cats is that dogs have masters, and cats have staff".

Happy cats make for happy staff. :-)

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Kelly Greene" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Advocate%20Cat%22

cybercat
January 12th 10, 01:53 AM
"---MIKE---" > wrote in message
...
>About three years ago I spent a week in the hospital with Sepsis.
>During that time Amber developed a bare spot on one side - probably due
>to the stress of my not being there. The vet gave her a prednisone shot
>and the fur grew back.

And Amber usually has no allergies, right? Gracie does, but when she is
stressed the grooming increases to the point that she loses hair and breaks
the skin. Cats are like people, different personalities and different
thresholds for stress, pain, etc.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44° 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Wendy
January 12th 10, 03:37 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> cybercat,
>>
>>>Get your **** straight before you comment on things you know too little
>>>about.
>>
>> Apartments are not houses. The Vet treated the problem appropriately. If
>> you don't like that, go after the Vet. Indoor cats certainly do get
>> fleas, especially if they are already there, which is typical of
>> self-barbering on entry of new quarters. And, you can bring them in on
>> your clothes if you garden or work in the yard in the warmer climates.
>>
>> Why don't your research Psychogenic Alopecia before attacking the
>> messenger? You might start here on the list of priorities to rule-out in
>> differential doagnosis. Allergies are the last on the list. I noted the
>> Vet did not prescribe allergy treatments in the form of oral steroids -
>> he simply took action to rule out the first three differentials first.
>>
>> http://www.petplace.com/cats/psychogenic-alopecia-in-cats/page1.aspx
>>
>> Yours is called and "ad hominem" attack btw. A.k.a., shoot the messenger
>> if you don't like the message or if it is different from yours. Usually
>> caused by resentment of new information or knowledge. Otherwise known as
>> a "self-inflicted learning disability".
>>
>> Get over your ego. Learn new things.
>>
>
> You're an idiot. Now *that* is an ad hominem attack. You stated that
> stress is not a likely cause of the excessive grooming that causes fur
> loss. This is horse ****. You just got here, but we've been discussing
> topics like this--and this particular topic--for years.
>

Stress certainly can be a factor and in this case with the recent move more
than likely the cause. The vet took care of another possible cause when he
treated for fleas. I haven't personally ever seen a cat yank out clumps of
fur because of a flea infestation however. I have seen hair loss associated
with stress, allergies and pain. I tend to start with the most obvious cause
first so would guess this is a stress issue. Perhaps there was an animal
living in the apartment previously and the smell is upsetting the cat or
it's just the new location that's doing it. They could try feliway as that
can take the edge off (keeps my guys sane with kitties coming and going in
my foster room). A really thorough cleaning and shampooing of carpeting
might help but using unscented products as adding yet one more new scent
could only exascerbate the problem.

W

Alison[_4_]
January 12th 10, 09:14 PM
"Nel" > wrote in message
...
>
> Jan 11, 2010: Hello, question for folks; any input on what this issue
> could be? My daughter and her BF moved to an Apt, and they brought his
> 4yr female cat. Prior, the cat lived with the BF parents, while he was
> in college. Now, "Enzo" seems to be licking & pulling at her fur; my
> daughter reports tufts aroudn the apt and some bare spots starting.
> They just took her to the Vet, and they have changed food (from MeowMix
> to something different), and even though she did not have fleas, they
> gave her "Advantage" flea topical medicine.
> Any ideas what may cause her to do this, & 'solutions' (beside, "Get
> Her a Friend"...) Thanks...>>>


How long ago did your daughter move into the apartment and when did she see
the vet. Whereabouts is the cat pulling the fur from and are there any
scabby bits?

Your vet first has to rule our any allergies before treating for stress.
Cats can be come highly allergic to a single flea bite and their diet can
cause allergies.

The cat will have been affected emotionally from the move so a Feliway
diffuser will help relieve her anxiety.
Alison

jmc
January 13th 10, 12:15 AM
Suddenly, without warning, Allan Smith exclaimed (1/11/2010 3:31 PM):
> Nel,
>
> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas. The
> new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be that the former
> tennants moved away from them). For some cats, it only takes one single
> flea. Wait the flea medicine to work. Advantage is an excellent choice.
>
> Does your daughter have itchy lesions resembling mosquito bites, especially
> on the legs or lower torso?
>
> It is highly unlikely that a remakably-sudden food allergy is the cause, and
> it is also highly unlikely that stress is a factor. That is not the way cats
> react to stress.
>

Actually, both statements are incorrect. Humans and cats (and other
animals) can develop allergies to anything, at any time.

And, cats quite often react to stress with self-destructive habit. My
cat did - it's called fur-mowing. Mine developed a naked belly from
over-grooming. She had no fur from as far as she could reach on her
chest, down to near her belly button.

To answer the OP, treating for fleas and trying new food are usually the
first things vets will try if a cat is fur-mowing. They might also
suggest a change in environment, if that's possible. If none of those
have any effect, they can put the cat on drugs for a short length of
time - they tried my cat on ClomiCalm first, which she reacted badly to-
made her so logy she couldn't function, so she was switched to
Amitryptyline (sp). The Ami worked, so we kept her on it through our
overseas move, until she'd settled in here. Not only did the fur-mowing
not return, but she recovered from the stress of traveling much quicker
than on previous overseas moves.

jmc

The Nice Mean Man[_2_]
January 13th 10, 02:27 AM
On Jan 11, 12:24*pm, Nel > wrote:
> Jan 11, 2010: *Hello, question for folks; *any input on what this issue
> could be? *My daughter and her BF moved to an Apt, and they brought his
> 4yr female cat. *Prior, the cat lived with the BF parents, while he was
> in college. *Now, "Enzo" seems to be licking & pulling at her fur; my
> daughter reports tufts aroudn the apt and some bare spots starting.
> They just took her to the Vet, and they have changed food (from MeowMix
> to something different), and even though she did not have fleas, they
> gave her "Advantage" flea topical medicine.
> Any ideas what may cause her to do this, & 'solutions' *(beside, "Get
> Her a Friend"...) *Thanks...
>
> --
> Nel

Maybe he needs a bath...? Or maybe your homes is not very clean. Do
you suffer from bedbugs? Because if you do you should know… they will
also attack your kitty there. Maybe you have a German cockroach
problem. Sometimes I’ve heard that they will lay eggs on sleeping
pets. They also chisel at your eyebrows while you sleep, too.
It sounds as though your boy is suffering. Try a bath once in a
while, and keep the outside door totally closed at night. That’s what
I would do if my cat was tearing at herself so…


TNMM

Bill Graham
January 13th 10, 06:50 AM
"jmc" > wrote in message
...
> Suddenly, without warning, Allan Smith exclaimed (1/11/2010 3:31 PM):
>> Nel,
>>
>> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
>> The new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be that the
>> former tennants moved away from them). For some cats, it only takes one
>> single flea. Wait the flea medicine to work. Advantage is an excellent
>> choice.
>>
>> Does your daughter have itchy lesions resembling mosquito bites,
>> especially on the legs or lower torso?
>>
>> It is highly unlikely that a remakably-sudden food allergy is the cause,
>> and it is also highly unlikely that stress is a factor. That is not the
>> way cats react to stress.
>>
>
> Actually, both statements are incorrect. Humans and cats (and other
> animals) can develop allergies to anything, at any time.
>
> And, cats quite often react to stress with self-destructive habit. My cat
> did - it's called fur-mowing. Mine developed a naked belly from
> over-grooming. She had no fur from as far as she could reach on her
> chest, down to near her belly button.
>
> To answer the OP, treating for fleas and trying new food are usually the
> first things vets will try if a cat is fur-mowing. They might also
> suggest a change in environment, if that's possible. If none of those
> have any effect, they can put the cat on drugs for a short length of
> time - they tried my cat on ClomiCalm first, which she reacted badly to-
> made her so logy she couldn't function, so she was switched to
> Amitryptyline (sp). The Ami worked, so we kept her on it through our
> overseas move, until she'd settled in here. Not only did the fur-mowing
> not return, but she recovered from the stress of traveling much quicker
> than on previous overseas moves.
>
> jmc

Cats can get psoriasis too. And this is as hard to cure in cats as it is in
humans.

jmc
January 13th 10, 05:25 PM
Suddenly, without warning, Bill Graham exclaimed (1/13/2010 12:50 AM):
>
> "jmc" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Suddenly, without warning, Allan Smith exclaimed (1/11/2010 3:31 PM):
>>> Nel,
>>>
>>> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to
>>> fleas. The new quarters probably have a flea infestation (it may be
>>> that the former tennants moved away from them). For some cats, it
>>> only takes one single flea. Wait the flea medicine to work. Advantage
>>> is an excellent choice.
>>>
>>> Does your daughter have itchy lesions resembling mosquito bites,
>>> especially on the legs or lower torso?
>>>
>>> It is highly unlikely that a remakably-sudden food allergy is the
>>> cause, and it is also highly unlikely that stress is a factor. That
>>> is not the way cats react to stress.
>>>
>>
>> Actually, both statements are incorrect. Humans and cats (and other
>> animals) can develop allergies to anything, at any time.
>>
>> And, cats quite often react to stress with self-destructive habit. My
>> cat did - it's called fur-mowing. Mine developed a naked belly from
>> over-grooming. She had no fur from as far as she could reach on her
>> chest, down to near her belly button.
>>
>> To answer the OP, treating for fleas and trying new food are usually
>> the first things vets will try if a cat is fur-mowing. They might
>> also suggest a change in environment, if that's possible. If none of
>> those have any effect, they can put the cat on drugs for a short
>> length of time - they tried my cat on ClomiCalm first, which she
>> reacted badly to- made her so logy she couldn't function, so she was
>> switched to Amitryptyline (sp). The Ami worked, so we kept her on it
>> through our overseas move, until she'd settled in here. Not only did
>> the fur-mowing not return, but she recovered from the stress of
>> traveling much quicker than on previous overseas moves.
>>
>> jmc
>
> Cats can get psoriasis too. And this is as hard to cure in cats as it is
> in humans.

I wasn't aware of that, fortunately it wasn't Meep's problem. Her belly
fur grew back and she's had no problems since.

Phil P.
January 16th 10, 10:26 AM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Nel,
>
> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.


Nonsense. Psychogenic alopecia is hair loss caused by excessive grooming
for which no medical cause can be found. IOW, the cause is psychological
rather than physiological... that's why its called "p-s-y-c-h-o-g-e-n-ic".
Psychogenic alopecia is almost always caused by *stress* not fleas. Alopecia
due to fleas or flea allergic dermatitis or food allergies or some other
hypersensitivity are physiological causes.

Btw, the OP did say the cat does not have fleas. 'guess you missed that
part.

cybercat
January 16th 10, 05:54 PM
"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Nel,
>>
>> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
>
>
> Nonsense. Psychogenic alopecia is hair loss caused by excessive
> grooming
> for which no medical cause can be found. IOW, the cause is psychological
> rather than physiological... that's why its called "p-s-y-c-h-o-g-e-n-ic".
> Psychogenic alopecia is almost always caused by *stress* not fleas.
> Alopecia
> due to fleas or flea allergic dermatitis or food allergies or some other
> hypersensitivity are physiological causes.
>
> Btw, the OP did say the cat does not have fleas. 'guess you missed that
> part.
>

This is what I meant when I told Allan, "you are an idiot." Thanks Phil. :D

Allan Smith
January 18th 10, 02:58 AM
Phil,

Yes, it is idiopathic. That's why there are differentials for diagnosis
(your "no other medical reason"). It's under "Conditions to rule out".

Read them in the referenced article. That's why I referenced it. Or maybe
post a reference that says something else.

Don't be afraid of reading references. You can learn things.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Phil P." > wrote in message
...
>
> "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Nel,
>>
>> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
>
>

Phil P.
January 18th 10, 08:57 AM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Phil,
>
> Yes, it is idiopathic. That's why there are differentials for diagnosis
> (your "no other medical reason"). It's under "Conditions to rule out".
>
> Read them in the referenced article. That's why I referenced it. Or maybe
> post a reference that says something else.
>
> Don't be afraid of reading references. You can learn things.


Perhaps you should follow your own advice. *You* posted the bogus
information- not me. I was simply correcting your erroneous statement.
Apparently *you* need to learn things- especially if you intend to
grandstand in this newsgroup and educate all us ignorant cat
folk......

In your reply to Nel you said "99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia
(self-barbering) is due to fleas." -- which is blatantly *false*.
Psychogenic alopecia is *never* caused by fleas. Its origin is
*psychological*- hence the name "psychogenic"- in case you're wondering why
its called "psychogenic alopecia". The veterinary medical term for the
condition is "neurodermatitis" "Neuro" -- refers to nerves not fleas- get
it?

I'm surprised you suggested I post a reference. I have a reference or two-
but I don't think you'll like them because they both prove your statement
wrong. You know the saying: "be careful what you wish for"


FELINE PSYCHOGENIC DERMATOSES

Muller & Kirk's Small Animal Dermatology 6th ed. Chap 15; Pg 1055

"Psychogenic Alopecia and Dermatitis

Psychogenic alopecia or dermatitis (neurodermatitis) is an alopecia or
chromic skin inflammation produced by constant licking. When dermatitis is
not present, the complaint may be of excessive grooming. The dermatic form
results from more severe grooming.

CAUSE AND PATHOGENESIS
The primary abnormality is thought to be excessive grooming that may result
from an anxiety neurosis. The anxiety may be caused by psychological factors
such as displacement phenomena (e.g., a new pet or baby in the household, a
move to new surroundings, boarding, hospitalization, loss of a favorite bed
or companion, or competition for a social hierarchy position with other pets
in the household or in response to other cats entering the affected cat's
territory). There is a breed predilection for the more emotional breeds,
such as Siamese and Abyssinian, although all the Oriental breeds may be
predisposed. *Feline psyclrogenic alopecia has been proposed as an animal
model of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Feline psychogenic alopecia and dermatitis may be expressed in many ways.
Some cats lick vigorously at a particular area until the sharp barbs of the
tongue produce alopecia, abrasion, ulceration, and secondary infection.
Other eats lick and chew more gently or over a more widespread area so that
alopecia is the predominant lesion. Some cats actually chew at their hair or
skin, whereas others chew and pull their hair out.

It has been proposed that the stress may induce an elevation in the levels
of adrenocorticotropic hormone and melalxocyte-stimulating hormone, which
then causes increased endorphin production. The endorphins protect the
animal from abnormalities associated with chronic stress. However, their
narcotic, addictive-like effect may act to reinforce the abnormal grooming
behavior. Agents with dopaminergic or opioid effects may decrease excessive
grooming."




Small Animal Dermatology: A Color Atlas and Therapeutic Guide. Medleau &
Hnilica

Miscellaneous Cutaneous Disorders of the Cat Chap. 15 pg 252

Feline Psychogenic Alopecia (neurodermatitis)

FEATURES

A self-induced alopecia from excessive grooming (licking, chewing, and/or
pulling hairs out). The overgrooming is a manifestation of anxiety, but the
owners may be unaware of this behavior if the cat does not do it in their
presence. Uncommon in cats, with Siamese, Burmese, and Abyssinian cats
possi*bly predisposed.

Alopecia is produced when the cat grooms hard enough to remove hairs but not
vigorously enough to damage the skin. There is regional, multifocal, or
generalized hair loss. The alopecia may occur any*where on the body where
the cat can lick, but it most commonly involves the medial forelegs, inner
thighs, perineum, and/or ventral abdomen. The hair loss is often bilaterally
symmetrical, but remaining hairs do not epilate easily. Close inspection of
the alopecic skin reveals that the hairs have not actually fallen out; they
are still present and broken off near the surface of the skin. Rarely,
overly aggressive grooming may result in an area of abraded skin. Hair in
the feces and/or vomited hairballs may be seen.

Nope- Nothing about fleas.....

HAND


>
> "Phil P." > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Allan Smith" > wrote in message
> > ...
> >> Nel,
> >>
> >> 99% of the time, Psychogenic Alopecia (self-barbering) is due to fleas.
> >
> >
>
>

cybercat
January 18th 10, 08:01 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...
> Phil,
>
> Yes, it is idiopathic. That's why there are differentials for diagnosis
> (your "no other medical reason"). It's under "Conditions to rule out".
>
> Read them in the referenced article. That's why I referenced it. Or maybe
> post a reference that says something else.
>
> Don't be afraid of reading references. You can learn things.
>

This is hilarious beyond words. I think I will let Phil handle this one. And
for being stump-****ing stupid enough to address Phil this way, when he has
saved many of our cats' lives, ta ta, wingnut.