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Ivy LittleVine
January 17th 10, 02:42 PM
I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!

I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
every month.

Here's the problem...

After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
cleaning their paws?

Matthew[_3_]
January 17th 10, 05:14 PM
you realize that what they have are caused by fleas right not the litter
box

"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
>I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> every month.
>
> Here's the problem...
>
> After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> cleaning their paws?
>

MaryL
January 17th 10, 06:20 PM
"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
>I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> every month.
>
> Here's the problem...
>
> After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> cleaning their paws?
>

Matthew is right. Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. Here is a site that
describes the process:
http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.microsoft:en-us&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&startIndex=&startPage=1

If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
deworming treatment again. However, you also need to take steps to
eradicate fleas. Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for fleas
to get into your home. For example, they could be transported on your shoes
or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. You may need to
treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. Part of the
treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
furniture. Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath carpets
because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. You will need to be vigilent
about this. My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that can
hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will become
the culprits for tapeworms. When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
couple of flea collars. *Do not* put them on your cats (they are toxic!).
Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then cut
a flea collar into small segments. Vacuum a few of those pieces into your
vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.

Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to trat
your cats. Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
dangerous.

MaryL

Ivy LittleVine
January 17th 10, 06:21 PM
On Jan 17, 10:14*am, "Matthew" >
wrote:
> you realize that what they have are caused by fleas *right not the litter
> box
>
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > every month.
>
> > Here's the problem...
>
> > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > cleaning their paws?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I use cedarcide... we don't have fleas. Two were avid mousers that
lived outside until recently. The vet said eating mice/crickets etc.
was probably the original cause. Only one (the same cat) is once again
showing signs of the problem... but beings they all share the same
litter boxes everyone has to receive medication.

Ivy LittleVine
January 17th 10, 06:25 PM
On Jan 17, 11:20*am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > every month.
>
> > Here's the problem...
>
> > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > cleaning their paws?
>
> Matthew is right. *Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
> result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. *Here is a site that
> describes the process:http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.micro...
>
> If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
> deworming treatment again. *However, you also need to take steps to
> eradicate fleas. *Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for fleas
> to get into your home. *For example, they could be transported on your shoes
> or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. *You may need to
> treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. *Part of the
> treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
> furniture. *Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath carpets
> because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. *You will need to be vigilent
> about this. *My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that can
> hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will become
> the culprits for tapeworms. *When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
> couple of flea collars. **Do not* put them on your cats (they are toxic!).
> Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then cut
> a flea collar into small segments. *Vacuum a few of those pieces into your
> vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.
>
> Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to trat
> your cats. *Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
> dangerous.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

We've had two long spells of subzero temperatures around here. No
fleas are coming in here on shoes or anything else for that matter...
unless they've been nursing antifreeze. <smile>

MaryL
January 17th 10, 06:44 PM
"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 17, 11:20 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > every month.
>
> > Here's the problem...
>
> > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > cleaning their paws?
>
> Matthew is right. Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
> result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. Here is a site
> that
> describes the
> process:http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.micro...
>
> If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
> deworming treatment again. However, you also need to take steps to
> eradicate fleas. Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for
> fleas
> to get into your home. For example, they could be transported on your
> shoes
> or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. You may need to
> treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. Part of the
> treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
> furniture. Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath
> carpets
> because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. You will need to be vigilent
> about this. My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that can
> hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will become
> the culprits for tapeworms. When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
> couple of flea collars. *Do not* put them on your cats (they are toxic!).
> Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then
> cut
> a flea collar into small segments. Vacuum a few of those pieces into your
> vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.
>
> Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to trat
> your cats. Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
> dangerous.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

We've had two long spells of subzero temperatures around here. No
fleas are coming in here on shoes or anything else for that matter...
unless they've been nursing antifreeze. <smile>

- - - - - - - - - - -

Yes, but...don't forget what my vet said. Flea eggs can lie dormant for up
to three years (and be invisible to people looking for them).

I spent my Christmas vacation with family and friends in Ohio, so I know
what you mean about living on antifreeze. :)

--
MaryL

Ivy LittleVine
January 17th 10, 07:11 PM
On Jan 17, 11:44*am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Jan 17, 11:20 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > > every month.
>
> > > Here's the problem...
>
> > > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > > cleaning their paws?
>
> > Matthew is right. Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
> > result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. Here is a site
> > that
> > describes the
> > process:http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.micro...
>
> > If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
> > deworming treatment again. However, you also need to take steps to
> > eradicate fleas. Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for
> > fleas
> > to get into your home. For example, they could be transported on your
> > shoes
> > or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. You may need to
> > treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. Part of the
> > treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
> > furniture. Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath
> > carpets
> > because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. You will need to be vigilent
> > about this. My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that can
> > hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will become
> > the culprits for tapeworms. When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
> > couple of flea collars. *Do not* put them on your cats (they are toxic!).
> > Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then
> > cut
> > a flea collar into small segments. Vacuum a few of those pieces into your
> > vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.
>
> > Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to trat
> > your cats. Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
> > dangerous.
>
> > MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> We've had two long spells of subzero temperatures around here. No
> fleas are coming in here on shoes or anything else for that matter...
> unless they've been nursing antifreeze. <smile>
>
> - - - - - - - - - - -
>
> Yes, but...don't forget what my vet said. *Flea eggs can lie dormant for up
> to three years (and be invisible to people looking for them).
>

I'm gonna have to quiz my vet's assistant about this stuff again.
She's the one who said... "if they all share a litterbox, they all
need medication." Perhaps she was referring only to roundworms, eh?

Just to give you half an idea what a fanatic I am about this. I have a
HEPA handvac (on my hands and knees) that I use to clean EVERY SQUARE
INCH of carpeting and furniture... after which I spray cedarcide
throughout my entire space. The cats also get a soaking. When
finished... I soak a Kleenex with cedarcide and suck it up into my
regular vacuum. Them varmits don't have a prayer in this house. On top
of the cedarcide... I also use UV light where they eat and on throw
rugs that can't be thrown into the washing machine. I also wipe my
floors up with straight white vinegar. If anybody else has any
cleaning tips PLEASE share them.


> I spent my Christmas vacation with family and friends in Ohio, so I know
> what you mean about living on antifreeze. *:)
>
> --
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

MaryL
January 17th 10, 07:21 PM
"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 17, 11:44 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Jan 17, 11:20 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
> > >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > > every month.
>
> > > Here's the problem...
>
> > > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > > cleaning their paws?
>
> > Matthew is right. Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
> > result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. Here is a site
> > that
> > describes the
> > process:http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.micro...
>
> > If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
> > deworming treatment again. However, you also need to take steps to
> > eradicate fleas. Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for
> > fleas
> > to get into your home. For example, they could be transported on your
> > shoes
> > or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. You may need to
> > treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. Part of
> > the
> > treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
> > furniture. Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath
> > carpets
> > because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. You will need to be vigilent
> > about this. My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that
> > can
> > hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will
> > become
> > the culprits for tapeworms. When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
> > couple of flea collars. *Do not* put them on your cats (they are
> > toxic!).
> > Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then
> > cut
> > a flea collar into small segments. Vacuum a few of those pieces into
> > your
> > vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.
>
> > Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to
> > trat
> > your cats. Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
> > dangerous.
>
> > MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> We've had two long spells of subzero temperatures around here. No
> fleas are coming in here on shoes or anything else for that matter...
> unless they've been nursing antifreeze. <smile>
>
> - - - - - - - - - - -
>
> Yes, but...don't forget what my vet said. Flea eggs can lie dormant for up
> to three years (and be invisible to people looking for them).
>

I'm gonna have to quiz my vet's assistant about this stuff again.
She's the one who said... "if they all share a litterbox, they all
need medication." Perhaps she was referring only to roundworms, eh?

Just to give you half an idea what a fanatic I am about this. I have a
HEPA handvac (on my hands and knees) that I use to clean EVERY SQUARE
INCH of carpeting and furniture... after which I spray cedarcide
throughout my entire space. The cats also get a soaking. When
finished... I soak a Kleenex with cedarcide and suck it up into my
regular vacuum. Them varmits don't have a prayer in this house. On top
of the cedarcide... I also use UV light where they eat and on throw
rugs that can't be thrown into the washing machine. I also wipe my
floors up with straight white vinegar. If anybody else has any
cleaning tips PLEASE share them.


> I spent my Christmas vacation with family and friends in Ohio, so I know
> what you mean about living on antifreeze. :)
>
> --
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -


Well, the litterbox could be a culprit if there are eggs in it (quite
possible). You obviously are scrupulous in cleaning (much more more than I
am), so please don't take my remarks about cleaning as an insult. The point
is, *anyone* could get a couple of fleas in the house and not notice it, and
that's all it takes because they (and especially their eggs) are so tiny.

MaryL

Ivy LittleVine
January 17th 10, 07:49 PM
On Jan 17, 12:21*pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Jan 17, 11:44 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ....
> > On Jan 17, 11:20 am, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> > wrote:
>
> > > "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> > ....
>
> > > >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > > > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > > > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > > > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > > > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > > > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > > > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > > > every month.
>
> > > > Here's the problem...
>
> > > > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > > > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > > > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > > > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > > > cleaning their paws?
>
> > > Matthew is right. Cats get tapeworms when they ingest fleas, not as a
> > > result of licking their paws after using the litterbox. Here is a site
> > > that
> > > describes the
> > > process:http://www.google.com/search?q=how+do+cats+get+tapeworm&rls=com.micro...
>
> > > If you're sure they're "back," then you will need to go through the
> > > deworming treatment again. However, you also need to take steps to
> > > eradicate fleas. Even if your cats are indoor-only, it's possible for
> > > fleas
> > > to get into your home. For example, they could be transported on your
> > > shoes
> > > or other clothing or even on the clothing of visitors. You may need to
> > > treat the perimeter of your house when you treat the indoors. Part of
> > > the
> > > treatment should involve *thoroughly* vacuuming the house, including
> > > furniture. Be sure to get into the edges of the room and underneath
> > > carpets
> > > because fleas can reside in tiny crevices. You will need to be vigilent
> > > about this. My vet once said that fleas have "timed release eggs" that
> > > can
> > > hatch as long as 3 years before finding a host--and the fleas will
> > > become
> > > the culprits for tapeworms. When you treat your house/apartment, buy a
> > > couple of flea collars. *Do not* put them on your cats (they are
> > > toxic!).
> > > Instead, empty your vacuum cleaner and take the contents *outside,* then
> > > cut
> > > a flea collar into small segments. Vacuum a few of those pieces into
> > > your
> > > vacuum cleaner bag or cannister to get any eggs that may be in there.
>
> > > Talk to your vet about Advantage or a similar product if you need to
> > > trat
> > > your cats. Over-the-counter medications are ineffective and are often
> > > dangerous.
>
> > > MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > We've had two long spells of subzero temperatures around here. No
> > fleas are coming in here on shoes or anything else for that matter...
> > unless they've been nursing antifreeze. <smile>
>
> > - - - - - - - - - - -
>
> > Yes, but...don't forget what my vet said. Flea eggs can lie dormant for up
> > to three years (and be invisible to people looking for them).
>
> I'm gonna have to quiz my vet's assistant about this stuff again.
> She's the one who said... "if they all share a litterbox, they all
> need medication." *Perhaps she was referring only to roundworms, eh?
>
> Just to give you half an idea what a fanatic I am about this. I have a
> HEPA handvac (on my hands and knees) that I use to clean EVERY SQUARE
> INCH of carpeting and furniture... after which I spray cedarcide
> throughout my entire space. The cats also get a soaking. When
> finished... I soak a Kleenex with cedarcide and suck it up into my
> regular vacuum. Them varmits don't have a prayer in this house. On top
> of the cedarcide... I also use UV light where they eat and on throw
> rugs that can't be thrown into the washing machine. I also wipe my
> floors up with straight white vinegar. If anybody else has any
> cleaning tips PLEASE share them.
>
> > I spent my Christmas vacation with family and friends in Ohio, so I know
> > what you mean about living on antifreeze. :)
>
> > --
> > MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Well, the litterbox could be a culprit if there are eggs in it (quite
> possible). *You obviously are scrupulous in cleaning (much more more than I
> am), so please don't take my remarks about cleaning as an insult. *The point
> is, *anyone* could get a couple of fleas in the house and not notice it, and
> that's all it takes because they (and especially their eggs) are so tiny.
>
> MaryL


I can testify to well-kept homes that never had indoor pets being
infested with fleas in their carpeting. So what you are saying holds a
spark of truth. I'm just gonna have to keep on my toes and not let
down my guard. Thanks for the little reminder, MaryL. :)

Allan Smith
January 18th 10, 01:51 AM
Ivy,

What kind of worm?

Cats can get roundworms not just in the litterbox, but from soil, grooming,
or elsewhere as well. The typical treatment is two, sometimes three,
wormings, three weeks apart.

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_roundworms_in_cats___kittens.html

Tapeworms are caused by ingesting fleas, either on their prey, or in
grooming themselves or each other. The typical treatement for tapeworms is
to get rid of fleas, then worm once. Though some vets advise a second
worming three weeks later, it can be skipped to see if any segments
reappear. I've never had to administer a second dose if fleas are not
present. If it is tapeworms that are back, it is likely that you have a flea
problem.

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_tapeworm.html

Drontal is my choice for a tablet womer - it gets roundworms, tapeworms, and
hookworms.

Profender is my choice for a spot-on treatment that gets roundworms,
tapeworms, and hookworms, and it is effective for three months, thus doesn't
need to be repeated in three weeks.

"Advantage" is a spot-on treatment that gets adult fleas.

"Advantage Multi" ("Advocate" in Europe) is a spot-on treatment that gets
adult fleas, roundworms and hookworms (but not tapeworms), ear mites, and
prevents heartworm (heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes - not typically a
problem for indoor cats).

If you have a flea infestation problem, Revolution may be a better choice,
as it kills adult fleas, flea larvae, and flea eggs, both on the cat as well
as in the environment, in addition to ear mites, roundworm and hookworm (but
not tapeworm), and prevents heartworms.

Best prices I've found are here, and no prescription is required:

Drontal -
http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Products/drc4t

Profender -
http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Wormer

Advantage -
http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Advantage%20Cats%22

Advantage Multi -
http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Advocate%20Cat%22

Revolution -
http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Shops/vidalspets/Categories/Flea/%22Revolution%20Cats%22

I use Advantage on the indoor cats (about $7/month) for normal flea control,
and Advantage Multi on the outdoor cats (about $10/month). Advantage Multi
is a little more expensive, but not much more than other flea-control
products, and does much more than just control fleas.

A neighbor who has a flea infestation in his house used Revolution on his
dogs, and reported excellent results within 30 days, without resorting to
some of the more tedious methods often used when fleas become established
indoors.

Allan

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
>I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!

Ivy LittleVine
January 18th 10, 02:37 AM
On Jan 17, 6:51*pm, "Allan Smith" > wrote:
> Ivy,
>
> What kind of worm?


Tapeworm. A very very tiny tapeworm... as compared in size to what I
found before I dewormed them on December 15th... where that segment
was previously 3x's thicker.

I usually feed them some high-end jack mackerel once a week fortified
with Nordic Naturals Omega-3 for pets... on a dark throw rug. I
spotted it after they finished eating and left... just like the last
time when I discovered a problem in Dec. after bringing in two outdoor
mousers.

I use cedarcide for everything. I believe it's a much healthier
alternative to other products. It kills fleas, their larvae and the
eggs... not to mention earmites etc. Makes the house smell like a
cedar closet, too. :)

http://www.cedarcidestore.com/ANIMALHEALTH.html




> Cats can get roundworms not just in the litterbox, but from soil, grooming,
> or elsewhere as well. The typical treatment is two, sometimes three,
> wormings, three weeks apart.
>
> http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_roundworms_in_cats___kittens.html
>
> Tapeworms are caused by ingesting fleas, either on their prey, or in
> grooming themselves or each other. The typical treatement for tapeworms is
> to get rid of fleas, then worm once. Though some vets advise a second
> worming three weeks later, it can be skipped to see if any segments
> reappear. I've never had to administer a second dose if fleas are not
> present. If it is tapeworms that are back, it is likely that you have a flea
> problem.
>
> http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_tapeworm.html
>
> Drontal is my choice for a tablet womer - it gets roundworms, tapeworms, and
> hookworms.
>
> Profender is my choice for a spot-on treatment that gets roundworms,
> tapeworms, and hookworms, and it is effective for three months, thus doesn't
> need to be repeated in three weeks.
>
> "Advantage" is a spot-on treatment that gets adult fleas.
>
> "Advantage Multi" ("Advocate" in Europe) is a spot-on treatment that gets
> adult fleas, roundworms and hookworms (but not tapeworms), ear mites, and
> prevents heartworm (heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes - not typically a
> problem for indoor cats).
>
> If you have a flea infestation problem, Revolution may be a better choice,
> as it kills adult fleas, flea larvae, and flea eggs, both on the cat as well
> as in the environment, in addition to ear mites, roundworm and hookworm (but
> not tapeworm), and prevents heartworms.
>
> Best prices I've found are here, and no prescription is required:
>
> Drontal -http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Sho...
>
> Profender -http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Sho...
>
> Advantage -http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Sho...
>
> Advantage Multi -http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Sho...
>
> Revolution -http://www.vidalspets.com/epages/vidalspets.sf/en_US/?ObjectPath=/Sho...
>
> I use Advantage on the indoor cats (about $7/month) for normal flea control,
> and Advantage Multi on the outdoor cats (about $10/month). Advantage Multi
> is a little more expensive, but not much more than other flea-control
> products, and does much more than just control fleas.
>
> A neighbor who has a flea infestation in his house used Revolution on his
> dogs, and reported excellent results within 30 days, without resorting to
> some of the more tedious methods often used when fleas become established
> indoors.
>
> Allan
>
> --
> One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
> ---
> True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
> *that they claim for themselves.
>
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Allan Smith
January 18th 10, 03:54 PM
Ivy,

Unless there are fleas in the litterbox (the dry clay dehydrates and kills
them) changing the box won't help unless the cat is eating litter and
happens upon a flea. There is only one way to get a tapeworm, and that is by
ingesting a flea.

An easy and highly effective way to check for environmental fleas is to put
a large bowl half full of soapy water on the floor, and put a bright
(incandescent, not flourescent) light a foot or two above it. The heat and
the light very strongly attract fleas from up to 25 feet away, they jump for
the light, are stunned by the impact with a hard surface, can't hold on to
the hot glass, and fall into the bowl and drown. A 50-or-so watt
reflector-type bulb directly above the bowl and pointed down at it is an
excellent choice, but a standard bulb works too. If the bowl is
light-colored, the drowned fleas are easily seen. This is an easy way to
check room-by-room to find the infested room(s). Many people are surprised
when they return to check the bowl in a couple of hours.

While there is much anecdotal discussion of cedar oil, and some aggressive
marketing of products, cedar oil is a repellent [1], not a killer, and is
more useful as a preventative than a "cure". Its method of action is as a
feeding-depressant, eventually starving the insect. That can take some time,
however, and does not affect existing eggs, larvae, and pupae.

See "Use profile" at
http://www.epa.gov/oppsrrd1/REDs/factsheets/3150fact.pdf
and footnote [1] below.

It has been found to be safe for dogs, but potentially toxic to the more
inefficient liver of the cat [2].

I've not yet met or heard-of a Vet that recommended cedar oil products for
cats. I see a lot of promotional material that says "prudent Vets recommend
....", or "Veterinarian-recommended", but I've not seen a "prudent Vet"
named, or a Vet willing to go "on record" recommending _only_ a cedar oil
product (if recommending one at all). I'm quite receptive to a discussion
with one, if I could find one.

http://www.justanswer.com/questions/2lrsw-is-it-safe-to-use-cedarwood-oil-to-get-rid-of-fleas-on-my

Borax powder remains the safest and most effective treatment for carpets and
floors, and many Vets sell such products, but they will caution you that it
does not adddress the problem of fleas on the pet, as physical contact with
the boric acid is required ot absorb the oils on the flea's body and cause
them to deydrate. It also has less effect on eggs, larvae, and pupae.

In short, the flea's life-cycle is complex and highly adapted to survival,
and thus difficult to effectively attack at only one of its four stages.

Good luck.

Allan

[1] A sampling of herbal and essential-oil product evaluations by the UK's
Control of Substances Hazardous to Health approval-evaluations of some of
these products is at
http://www.hse.gov.uk/biocides/copr/approvals/approvals0405.pdf
Note that most are classified as 'repellants', or "for repellant use only".
In most cases, the suffix "-cide" may not be used in labelling, as the
product does not directly kill fleas (the UK is more strict about
truth-in-advertising and labelling than the US is).

[2] From http://www.messybeast.com/teatree.htm:

"Cedar Oil, also marketed as a flea treatment, is also highly toxic to cats.
It has been found to be toxic orally, when absorbed through the skin and an
irritant if the fumes are inhaled (if the fumes are concentrated enough it
may be absorbed through the lining of the lungs in toxic quantities). It is
irresponsibly marketed by Cedarcide as safe for pets, but COSHH and
toxicology data indicates it is toxic. Claims supporting Cedarcide are
highly biased and were written for dog treatments (dogs have very different
and more efficient liver function than cats). They are advertising claims,
not scientific claims, and perpetuate the misconception tha natural means
"safe". "

--
One asks, many answer, all learn -- Plato, on the 'Forum
---
True civility is when every one gives to every other one every right
that they claim for themselves.

"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 17, 6:51 pm, "Allan Smith" > wrote:
> Ivy,
>
> What kind of worm?


Tapeworm. A very very tiny tapeworm... as compared in size to what I
found before I dewormed them on December 15th... where that segment
was previously 3x's thicker.

Phil P.
January 18th 10, 08:19 PM
"Allan Smith" > wrote in message
...


There is only one way to get a tapeworm, and that is by
> ingesting a flea.

Wrong again, Einstein! You're just chock full of erroneous information,
aren't you Professor??? *Two* species of tapeworm infect cats. Taenia.
taeniaeformis, and Dipylidium caninum. Taeniids are transmitted by eating
rodents or rabbits and only Dipylidium are flea-vectored. Make a note of
that.

This is the second time I had to correct your bogus information in as many
days. If you want to educate all us ignorant cat folk, at least make sure
your information is correct.

Phil P.
January 18th 10, 08:23 PM
"Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
...
On Jan 17, 10:14 am, "Matthew" >
wrote:
> you realize that what they have are caused by fleas right not the litter
> box
>
> "Ivy LittleVine" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> >I am the somewhat inexperienced foster mother of multiple INDOOR
> > felines living in a small space. I recently dewormed my crew less than
> > a month ago for the first time and noticed this morning that They-y-
> > y'r-r-r-e-e-e Ba-a-a-c-c-c-k-k-k !-!-!
>
> > I went through my vet for the medication and successfully administered
> > roundworm and tapeworm medication to them at home myself. At $10 a
> > crack per cat... I cannot afford to do this on a continuous basis
> > every month.
>
> > Here's the problem...
>
> > After giving them their medication... when is the best time (how many
> > days do I wait?) before introducing their new litter boxes? and what
> > type of solution do I need to clean their paws/claws with to help
> > eliminate any possible re-infestations that can occur from them
> > cleaning their paws?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

>I use cedarcide...

You shouldn't use cedar oil products on or around cats- the aroma overwhelms
their olfactory senses and its potentially toxic to their liver.. Cats are
particularly sensitive to cedar aroma because of their huge (compared to
humans) olfactory epithelium, which can have an area 10 times larger than
ours. So an aroma that smells nice to you could be torturous for a cat.


we don't have fleas. Two were avid mousers that
>lived outside until recently. The vet said eating mice/crickets etc.
>was probably the original cause.

Your vet is correct. Two species of tapeworm infect cats. Taenia.
taeniaeformis, and Dipylidium caninum. Taeniids are transmitted by eating
rodents or rabbits and Dipylidium are flea-vectored.


>Only one (the same cat) is once again
>showing signs of the problem... but beings they all share the same
>litter boxes everyone has to receive medication.

Cats cannot and do not acquire tapeworms by eating the segments or the tiny
egg packets-- a cat must ingest fleas or raw meat from birds, rodents, fish
or other mammals. These are called intermediate hosts and are essential to
the life cycle of the tapeworm.

One Droncit tablet each should solve your problem. Sometimes a second
treatment is necessary about a week or two later.

Phil