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dgk
January 19th 10, 01:54 PM
at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
group:

Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
pounds.

--------------

Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.

Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?

Magic Mood Jeep[_4_]
January 19th 10, 05:27 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> group:
>
> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> pounds.
>
> --------------
>
> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?


How about this: Monitor your damn brats so they will shut up and not bother
the cat. And while your at it, chop off your own fingers at the first
knuckle to "declaw" yourself, and get yourself spayed to boot doing all of
these will definitely help calm your household so that the cat will enjoy
her senior years.

MLB[_2_]
January 20th 10, 01:06 AM
dgk wrote:
> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> group:
>
> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> pounds.
>
> --------------
>
> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?


My Grandmother would tell that lady to get some bone in her nose and
teach the kids to behave. When my grandchildren came (long ag0) they
were ordered to leave Princess alone. Now their kids are only allowed
to look and don't touch TuTu. MLB

Bill Graham
January 20th 10, 07:44 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> group:
>
> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> pounds.
>
> --------------
>
> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?

Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with it.
At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either the
kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
kid grows up a bit.

dgk
January 21st 10, 01:47 PM
On Tue, 19 Jan 2010 23:44:27 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>
>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
>> group:
>>
>> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
>> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
>> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
>> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
>> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
>> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
>> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
>> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
>> pounds.
>>
>> --------------
>>
>> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
>> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>>
>> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>
>Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
>people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with it.
>At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either the
>kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
>neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
>cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
>and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
>kid grows up a bit.

What do you think she is going to do if she gets no takers? And taking
in a 10 year old cat is just asking for big vet bills. I don't think
the cat is looking for a new home, A newborn screaming is causing a
problem for a cat? Yes, she might find it annoying but no where near
as annoying as losing her home and family.

Bill Graham
January 21st 10, 11:45 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 19 Jan 2010 23:44:27 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"dgk" > wrote in message
...
>>> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
>>> group:
>>>
>>> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
>>> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
>>> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
>>> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
>>> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
>>> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
>>> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
>>> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
>>> pounds.
>>>
>>> --------------
>>>
>>> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
>>> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>>>
>>> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>>
>>Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
>>people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with
>>it.
>>At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either
>>the
>>kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
>>neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
>>cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
>>and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
>>kid grows up a bit.
>
> What do you think she is going to do if she gets no takers? And taking
> in a 10 year old cat is just asking for big vet bills. I don't think
> the cat is looking for a new home, A newborn screaming is causing a
> problem for a cat? Yes, she might find it annoying but no where near
> as annoying as losing her home and family.

So your advice is...........?

January 22nd 10, 02:44 AM
On Jan 19, 11:44*pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote in message

> Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
> people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with it.
> At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either the
> kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
> neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
> cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
> and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
> kid grows up a bit.

One, changing owners is stressful for a cat, especially an older cat.

Two, most people won't take an older cat. You miss all the easy years
and start off right before they hit all the vet bills and then you
lose them. It's harsh to think that, but if you had a choice between a
youngster and a 10 year old, wouldn't you be likely to pick the
youngster? More years of enjoyment.

The person may or may not have a badly behaving kid. It could be that
they know the cat is headed for vet bills and want to ditch it now.
After all, it is cheaper to give it away than to pay to put it down.
And anybody who truly cares about their pets will simply teach their
kids to behave properly and make sure they aren't together
unsupervised. Millions of kids grow up each day with pets in their
home, who are not being abused. It's not that hard.

My youngest niece used to be a terror. Very badly behaved with
animals. And her parents would not discipline her. She kept playing
rough after we warned her. So, when the cat got her, there was no
sympathy. That's what you get for not respecting the cat. After that,
we didn't allow her around the animals. We limited her visits, and we
always made sure to put away the animals before she arrived. She was
not allowed in those rooms. She would complain, and we would simply
state that the animals are not to be messed with, and this is the best
way to make sure they are safe. She has never spent the night in our
home. Sadly, we just coudldn't risk it. She is 14 now, and we do leave
the pets out for short visits. But She isn't dangerous like before.

January 22nd 10, 02:52 AM
On Jan 21, 3:45*pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > On Tue, 19 Jan 2010 23:44:27 -0800, "Bill Graham" >
> > wrote:
>
> >>"dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
> >>> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> >>> group:
>
> >>> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> >>> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> >>> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> >>> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> >>> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> >>> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> >>> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> >>> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> >>> pounds.
>
> >>> --------------
>
> >>> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> >>> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> >>> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>
> >>Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
> >>people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with
> >>it.
> >>At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either
> >>the
> >>kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
> >>neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
> >>cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
> >>and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
> >>kid grows up a bit.
>
> > What do you think she is going to do if she gets no takers? And taking
> > in a 10 year old cat is just asking for big vet bills. I don't think
> > the cat is looking for a new home, A newborn screaming is causing a
> > problem for a cat? Yes, she might find it annoying but no where near
> > as annoying as losing her home and family.
>
> So your advice is...........?



Give the cat a safe place to retreat to and teach the damn kid.

Parent up.

Bill Graham
January 22nd 10, 11:48 PM
> wrote in message
...
On Jan 19, 11:44 pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "dgk" > wrote in message

> Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
> people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with
> it.
> At least, she is trying to resolve the situation without hurting either
> the
> kid or the cat. I would recommend (to her if I could, ) that she find a
> neighbor who lives close by that would like to have the cat. This way, the
> cat could visit her, still enjoy it's usual haunts, (cats are territorial
> and hate leaving their territories) And might even move back in after the
> kid grows up a bit.

One, changing owners is stressful for a cat, especially an older cat.

Two, most people won't take an older cat. You miss all the easy years
and start off right before they hit all the vet bills and then you
lose them. It's harsh to think that, but if you had a choice between a
youngster and a 10 year old, wouldn't you be likely to pick the
youngster? More years of enjoyment.

The person may or may not have a badly behaving kid. It could be that
they know the cat is headed for vet bills and want to ditch it now.
After all, it is cheaper to give it away than to pay to put it down.
And anybody who truly cares about their pets will simply teach their
kids to behave properly and make sure they aren't together
unsupervised. Millions of kids grow up each day with pets in their
home, who are not being abused. It's not that hard.

My youngest niece used to be a terror. Very badly behaved with
animals. And her parents would not discipline her. She kept playing
rough after we warned her. So, when the cat got her, there was no
sympathy. That's what you get for not respecting the cat. After that,
we didn't allow her around the animals. We limited her visits, and we
always made sure to put away the animals before she arrived. She was
not allowed in those rooms. She would complain, and we would simply
state that the animals are not to be messed with, and this is the best
way to make sure they are safe. She has never spent the night in our
home. Sadly, we just coudldn't risk it. She is 14 now, and we do leave
the pets out for short visits. But She isn't dangerous like before.

Yes. There are people on death row in prisons who started out
torturing/killing animals. But you can't assume that is the case just
because someone is asking for advice when she sees that her cat is annoyed
by her kid. We have great grandkids who scare away the feral cat, and
sometimes one or two of the other cats, but they get along with Meggie, (who
was raised around children) fine. Our house has plenty of places where the
cats can go to hide if they don't like the company.....They are all outside
cats, and they can always escape through one of the cat doors to the great
outside world. As a matter of fact, they sometimes hide in the house so well
that we can't find them, and wonder where they were when they suddenly show
up, and we realize from their warm fur that they haven't been outside.
If there is a place to hide, a cat will find it. They love nothing better
than to hide out in some new place that no one knows about. We have one that
found a place in the kitchen, behind the built-in dishwasher.....How she can
squeeze behind it is a mystery to me, but she does.......

harry
January 23rd 10, 01:28 AM
On Jan 19, 8:54*am, dgk > wrote:
> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> group:
>
> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> pounds.
>
> --------------
>
> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?

>
>

Hello,

My offer is this: either beat the sht out of the idiot kid every time
it commits a cruel act against a helpless animal, or invite me over to
beat the sht out of you for being a negligent mother, plus committing
cruelty to helpless animals. You sure are a piece of work . . . rip
out your uterus before you produce anymore of like.

Truly

Truth will set you free, according to Jesus, in John 8:32

Stan Brown
January 23rd 10, 03:49 PM
Tue, 19 Jan 2010 08:54:06 -0500 from dgk >:
>
> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
> group:
>
> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
> pounds.
>
> --------------
>
> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>
> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?

Yes:

"Thanks for trying to find a better home for your cat. I hope you
have success."

Like it or not, a parent can't monitor a child's behavior 24/7. Even
good children can terrorize a cat when they're too young to
understand that the cat is a living creature, and 20 months seems to
qualify.

As for the screaming, if *I* lived in a home with constant baby
screaming, I'd be a nervous wreck. Some cats have lower tolerance for
that sort of thing.

If the cat is clearly suffering, and the situation can't be changed
(gagging the baby is obviously not an option, and nor is following
the toddler around every minute of the day), then a new home is the
best option for the cat.


--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

Stan Brown
January 23rd 10, 03:50 PM
Tue, 19 Jan 2010 23:44:27 -0800 from Bill Graham >:
> "dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
> > [quoted text muted]
> > Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
> > for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
> >
> > Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>
> Why be so harsh? She is trying to do her best for the cat.....A lot of
> people (I have known a few) would just put the cat down and be done with it.


Exactly -- or they would just abandon it somewhere. Seems to me like
this person is making the best of a bad situation.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...

starcat
January 23rd 10, 08:11 PM
"Stan Brown" > wrote in message
t...
> Tue, 19 Jan 2010 08:54:06 -0500 from dgk >:
>>
>> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
>> group:
>>
>> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
>> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
>> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
>> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
>> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
>> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
>> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
>> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
>> pounds.
>>
>> --------------
>>
>> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
>> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>>
>> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>
> Yes:
>
> "Thanks for trying to find a better home for your cat. I hope you
> have success."
>
> Like it or not, a parent can't monitor a child's behavior 24/7. Even
> good children can terrorize a cat when they're too young to
> understand that the cat is a living creature, and 20 months seems to
> qualify.
>
> As for the screaming, if *I* lived in a home with constant baby
> screaming, I'd be a nervous wreck. Some cats have lower tolerance for
> that sort of thing.
>
> If the cat is clearly suffering, and the situation can't be changed
> (gagging the baby is obviously not an option, and nor is following
> the toddler around every minute of the day), then a new home is the
> best option for the cat.
>
>
> --
> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
> http://OakRoadSystems.com
> Shikata ga nai...

Even though it is difficult for an older cat to make an adjustment to a new
home, it can be done, and cats are far more adaptable than people give them
credit for. My mother passed away several years ago and she had three cats.
My father could only keep one, so that left two, one of which, a one-person
cat who missed my mother terribly, with no home. Even though they were
older, I ended up taking the leftover two, flying each one across the
country (in the cabin with me - one at a time). It was tough for them, but
they did adjust and are both very happy and healthy. And the one-person
cat? He is now my baby - one of the sweetest cats I've ever had.

It CAN be done if the new home is the right one with lots of love and
patience. The right home is worth the adjustment, especially when coming
from an awful one or no home at all.

Bill Graham
January 23rd 10, 10:17 PM
"starcat" > wrote in message
m...
>
> "Stan Brown" > wrote in message
> t...
>> Tue, 19 Jan 2010 08:54:06 -0500 from dgk >:
>>>
>>> at how cruel people can be. Here's a posting from the local Freecycle
>>> group:
>>>
>>> Our 10-year-old cat, Cleo, is looking for a new home to escape the
>>> terrors of our two young children. Cleo is a spayed, de-clawed, indoor
>>> female cat with a nice demeanor. She has tolerated our 20-month-old
>>> son's chasing and tail-pulling (and has never bitten him, though often
>>> deserved) and is now subjected to our newborn's screaming. We would
>>> love to find a calmer, more suitable home for her to enjoy her prime.
>>> Cleo is white and grayish with bright blue eyes (google "lynx point
>>> siamese" for images of cats that look similar) and is about 10-11
>>> pounds.
>>>
>>> --------------
>>>
>>> Oh isn't that such concern for the benefit of the cat. Live in home
>>> for ten years and now gets kicked out because the newborn wails away.
>>>
>>> Would anyone like to make some comments so I can forward them?
>>
>> Yes:
>>
>> "Thanks for trying to find a better home for your cat. I hope you
>> have success."
>>
>> Like it or not, a parent can't monitor a child's behavior 24/7. Even
>> good children can terrorize a cat when they're too young to
>> understand that the cat is a living creature, and 20 months seems to
>> qualify.
>>
>> As for the screaming, if *I* lived in a home with constant baby
>> screaming, I'd be a nervous wreck. Some cats have lower tolerance for
>> that sort of thing.
>>
>> If the cat is clearly suffering, and the situation can't be changed
>> (gagging the baby is obviously not an option, and nor is following
>> the toddler around every minute of the day), then a new home is the
>> best option for the cat.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
>> http://OakRoadSystems.com
>> Shikata ga nai...
>
> Even though it is difficult for an older cat to make an adjustment to a
> new home, it can be done, and cats are far more adaptable than people give
> them credit for. My mother passed away several years ago and she had
> three cats. My father could only keep one, so that left two, one of which,
> a one-person cat who missed my mother terribly, with no home. Even though
> they were older, I ended up taking the leftover two, flying each one
> across the country (in the cabin with me - one at a time). It was tough
> for them, but they did adjust and are both very happy and healthy. And
> the one-person cat? He is now my baby - one of the sweetest cats I've
> ever had.
>
> It CAN be done if the new home is the right one with lots of love and
> patience. The right home is worth the adjustment, especially when coming
> from an awful one or no home at all.
Yes. One of my 5 cats, "Junie" came to us because her owner died when Junie
was about 8 years old. She has adapted very well, and is now (at 11) a,
"happy cat" again.

Stan Brown
January 24th 10, 06:48 AM
Sat, 23 Jan 2010 14:11:34 -0600 from starcat >:
> Even though it is difficult for an older cat to make an adjustment to a new
> home, it can be done, and cats are far more adaptable than people give them
> credit for.

Agreed -- it takes time and patience, and many people are deficient
in one or both.

Milo (a/k/a Destructo the Visigoth) has been with me for a year and a
half now, and I'm still noticing his personality change. To me that
says it just takes him a *really* long time to adjust to a new home.

In just the past couple of weeks, for example, he's started draping
himself on my shoulder almost every time I watch TV.



--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com
Shikata ga nai...