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View Full Version : Hi All, Need Some Advice [feral cat?]


Max[_2_]
February 17th 10, 04:39 AM
OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
operating under the name "MC".

Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!

The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.

Now I have another question.

Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.

I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
closer to the inside of the trap.

This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!

But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.

My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?

Any thoughts?

Thanks,
M

Bill Graham
February 17th 10, 05:18 AM
"Max" > wrote in message
...
> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> operating under the name "MC".
>
> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> Now I have another question.
>
> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
> M

The people I have known that tamed feral cats let them run anywhere they
wanted inside their houses, and just left food and water and a litter box
out where they could get at it and pretty soon the cat tamed himself. But
their other cats were inside cats and couldn't leave. In my case, I had
other cats who were outside cats, and they could come and go thru cat doors,
so it took me a very long time to tame mine. I just fed him and brought the
food gradually inside the house until the cat was spending a lot of time
inside and after a year or two, he was tamed without really knowing it.

Bill Graham
February 17th 10, 05:40 AM
"Max" > wrote in message
...
> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> operating under the name "MC".
>
> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> Now I have another question.
>
> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
> M

Oh.....I forgot to mention....Get him neutered as soon as possible.....This
will greatly accelerate the taming process....

Max[_2_]
February 17th 10, 06:27 AM
On Feb 16, 11:40*pm, "Bill Graham" > wrote:
> "Max" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> > advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> > operating under the name "MC".
>
> > Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> > The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> > to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> > worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> > his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> > any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> > around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> > litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> > Now I have another question.
>
> > Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> > cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> > I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> > live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> > closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> > This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> > But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> > his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> > He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> > My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> > in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> > experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> > it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> > and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> > Any thoughts?
>
> > Thanks,
> > M
>
> Oh.....I forgot to mention....Get him neutered as soon as possible.....This
> will greatly accelerate the taming process....

Thanks Bill :-) I sure appreciate your thoughts. I intend to neuter
this one ASAP ;-) I plan to keep working with kitty, too, but I agree
with you... that cat will have to set the pace. Wish me luck and
thanks,
Melissa

Phil P.
February 17th 10, 08:12 AM
"Max" > wrote in message
...
> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> operating under the name "MC".
>
> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> Now I have another question.
>
> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
> M

If he really is feral, the best way to tame him and acclimate him to people
is keep him a medium size cage- about 2'x3'- during the process. If you let
him run loose in your home, he'll only run and hide when people are around.
You want him to learn you mean him no harm- if he's able to run away and
hide every time you're around, you'll never get him to trust you- or it will
take years. Some people put a carrier in the cage and tie the door open to
the side of the cage. I don't agree with that method because it gives the
cat a place to hide. Hiding places are great for pet cats- but not for
ferals you're trying to acclimate to people. Put his bed in the back of the
cage and the litter box and food and water bowls in the front of the cage on
opposite sides where you can change them safely without reaching to far into
the cage. Keep the cage on a table in your living room or in the room where
you spend the most time. If you like to read, sit by his cage and read.
Reading out loud is good idea. Just don't force yourself on him. When you
feed him, see if he'll eat while you're there. If he does- that's a good
sign. Every time you open the cage to clean the litter box, gently toss a
treat to him. You want him to associate you with good things.

I don't have the time to explain the whole process right now- but this
should point you in the right direction. Just remember, p a t i e n c e.

Good luck,

Phil

cybercat
February 17th 10, 02:09 PM
"Phil P." > wrote
>
> If he really is feral, the best way to tame him and acclimate him to
> people
> is keep him a medium size cage- about 2'x3'- during the process. If you
> let
> him run loose in your home, he'll only run and hide when people are
> around.
> You want him to learn you mean him no harm- if he's able to run away and
> hide every time you're around, you'll never get him to trust you- or it
> will
> take years. Some people put a carrier in the cage and tie the door open
> to
> the side of the cage. I don't agree with that method because it gives the
> cat a place to hide. Hiding places are great for pet cats- but not for
> ferals you're trying to acclimate to people. Put his bed in the back of
> the
> cage and the litter box and food and water bowls in the front of the cage
> on
> opposite sides where you can change them safely without reaching to far
> into
> the cage. Keep the cage on a table in your living room or in the room
> where
> you spend the most time. If you like to read, sit by his cage and read.
> Reading out loud is good idea. Just don't force yourself on him. When you
> feed him, see if he'll eat while you're there. If he does- that's a good
> sign. Every time you open the cage to clean the litter box, gently toss a
> treat to him. You want him to associate you with good things.
>
> I don't have the time to explain the whole process right now- but this
> should point you in the right direction. Just remember, p a t i e n c e.
>

I wanted to add that a lady at one of our most successful no-kill shelters
keeps her ferals in the bathroom that she uses, for the same reason: no
place to hide. (Envisioning this, I see constant efforts to keep the cat IN
thebathroom, so I think a cage is better.) And she said she thinks she has
had good success with this because the cat can smell her smells (!) and see
her going about ordinary, understandable business on a regular basis. Also,
there is the fact that most cats seem to find people on toilets
irresistable. My 4-month-old gets inside the pants around one's ankles and
settles in. :) I had on sweats a few times and pulled them up so that she
slithered down one leg and out the ankle.

Max[_2_]
February 17th 10, 05:32 PM
On Feb 17, 8:09*am, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Phil P." > wrote
>
>
>
>
>
> > If he really is feral, the best way to tame him and acclimate him to
> > people
> > is keep him a medium size cage- about 2'x3'- during the process. *If you
> > let
> > him run loose in your home, he'll only run and hide when people are
> > around.
> > You want him to learn you mean him no harm- if he's able to run away and
> > hide every time you're around, you'll never get him to trust you- or it
> > will
> > take years. *Some people put a carrier in the cage and tie the door open
> > to
> > the side of the cage. *I don't agree with that method because it gives the
> > cat a place to hide. *Hiding places are great for pet cats- but not for
> > ferals you're trying to acclimate to people. Put his bed in the back of
> > the
> > cage and the litter box and food and water bowls in the front of the cage
> > on
> > opposite sides where you can change them safely without reaching to far
> > into
> > the cage. Keep the cage on a table in your living room or in the room
> > where
> > you spend the most time. *If you like to read, sit by his cage and read.
> > Reading out loud is good idea. Just don't force yourself on him. *When you
> > feed him, see if he'll eat while you're there. *If he does- that's a good
> > sign. *Every time you open the cage to clean the litter box, gently toss a
> > treat to him. *You want him to associate you with good things.
>
> > I don't have the time to explain the whole process right now- but this
> > should point you in the right direction. Just remember, p a t i e n c e..
>
> I wanted to add that a lady at one of our most successful no-kill shelters
> keeps her ferals in the bathroom that she uses, for the same reason: no
> place to hide. (Envisioning this, I see constant efforts to keep the cat IN
> thebathroom, so I think a cage is better.) And she said she thinks she has
> had good success with this because the cat can smell her smells (!) and see
> her going about ordinary, understandable business on a regular basis. Also,
> there is the fact that most cats seem to find people on toilets
> irresistable. My 4-month-old gets inside the pants around one's ankles and
> settles in. :) I had on sweats a few times and pulled them up so that she
> slithered down one leg and out the ankle.

Yes, Phil and cybercat, those tips are very helpful. At least I feel
we are on the right track. This morning kitty saw me and started
running around the cage in a frenzy... exactly the way he/she acted
when kitty was in the live trap, so I think the cat is quite feral.
Right now kitty is in a cage of the size Phil stated. Kitty is in the
garage though, because I don't want to expose my two house cats to
anything. I may bring that cage inside a bedroom today so kitty can be
warmer and that will enable me to spend more time comfortably with the
new kitty.

Am I being overly careful about keeping the cat away from my two house
cats?

Phil P.
February 17th 10, 06:34 PM
"Max" > wrote in message
...


>Am I being overly careful about keeping the cat away from my two house
>cats?

Take him to the vet *right now*. You should have taken him to the vet to
be tested and neutered while he was still in the trap. Put a carrier in the
cage- don't try to touch him. He should run into the carrier to hide. Use a
broomstick through the bars of the cage to hold the carrier door shut while
you lock it.

MLB[_2_]
February 17th 10, 10:52 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Phil P." > wrote
>> If he really is feral, the best way to tame him and acclimate him to
>> people
>> is keep him a medium size cage- about 2'x3'- during the process. If you
>> let
>> him run loose in your home, he'll only run and hide when people are
>> around.
>> You want him to learn you mean him no harm- if he's able to run away and
>> hide every time you're around, you'll never get him to trust you- or it
>> will
>> take years. Some people put a carrier in the cage and tie the door open
>> to
>> the side of the cage. I don't agree with that method because it gives the
>> cat a place to hide. Hiding places are great for pet cats- but not for
>> ferals you're trying to acclimate to people. Put his bed in the back of
>> the
>> cage and the litter box and food and water bowls in the front of the cage
>> on
>> opposite sides where you can change them safely without reaching to far
>> into
>> the cage. Keep the cage on a table in your living room or in the room
>> where
>> you spend the most time. If you like to read, sit by his cage and read.
>> Reading out loud is good idea. Just don't force yourself on him. When you
>> feed him, see if he'll eat while you're there. If he does- that's a good
>> sign. Every time you open the cage to clean the litter box, gently toss a
>> treat to him. You want him to associate you with good things.
>>
>> I don't have the time to explain the whole process right now- but this
>> should point you in the right direction. Just remember, p a t i e n c e.
>>
>
> I wanted to add that a lady at one of our most successful no-kill shelters
> keeps her ferals in the bathroom that she uses, for the same reason: no
> place to hide. (Envisioning this, I see constant efforts to keep the cat IN
> thebathroom, so I think a cage is better.) And she said she thinks she has
> had good success with this because the cat can smell her smells (!) and see
> her going about ordinary, understandable business on a regular basis. Also,
> there is the fact that most cats seem to find people on toilets
> irresistable. My 4-month-old gets inside the pants around one's ankles and
> settles in. :) I had on sweats a few times and pulled them up so that she
> slithered down one leg and out the ankle.
>
>
IMHO Cats in the bathroom seem to be an instinct left over from the
"wild" to protect those other cats in a vulnerable position. After
all, who wants a predator creeping up on a friend who is busy doing what
has to be done in an awkward position? MLB

cybercat
February 17th 10, 11:38 PM
"MLB" > wrote
>>
> IMHO Cats in the bathroom seem to be an instinct left over from the
> "wild" to protect those other cats in a vulnerable position. After all,
> who wants a predator creeping up on a friend who is busy doing what has to
> be done in an awkward position?

An interesting and plausible theory. Lately our kitten is stalking Gracie
when she is in the box. We do have three, but the kitten finds her. I
discourage this, to say the least.

Max[_2_]
February 18th 10, 03:09 AM
On Feb 17, 5:38*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "MLB" > wrote
>
>
>
> > IMHO *Cats in the bathroom seem to be an instinct left over from the
> > "wild" to protect those other cats in a vulnerable position. * After all,
> > who wants a predator creeping up on a friend who is busy doing what has to
> > be done in an awkward position?
>
> An interesting and plausible theory. Lately our kitten is stalking Gracie
> when she is in the box. We do have three, but the kitten finds her. I
> discourage this, to say the least.

Interesting. I don't know though... when I am in the BR my cats seem
only to be looking for some loving. It seems to me they know I have a
few spare moments to love on them. Maybe that is not how it started...
But that is at least how it seems now :-)

cybercat
February 18th 10, 04:01 AM
"Max" > wrote in message
...
On Feb 17, 5:38 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "MLB" > wrote
>
>
>
> > IMHO Cats in the bathroom seem to be an instinct left over from the
> > "wild" to protect those other cats in a vulnerable position. After all,
> > who wants a predator creeping up on a friend who is busy doing what has
> > to
> > be done in an awkward position?
>
> An interesting and plausible theory. Lately our kitten is stalking Gracie
> when she is in the box. We do have three, but the kitten finds her. I
> discourage this, to say the least.

>Interesting. I don't know though... when I am in the BR my cats seem
>only to be looking for some loving. It seems to me they know I have a
>few spare moments to love on them. Maybe that is not how it started...
>But that is at least how it seems now :-)

Oh, I agree, with you and with MLB--I am a Goddess to my cats while on The
Throne. :) I was bringing up my kitten's behavior as an exception to that.
And something I have to stay on, because anything that makes a cat
uncomfortable in the box may cause inappropriate elimination eventually.

Max[_2_]
February 18th 10, 05:18 AM
On Feb 17, 10:01*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Max" > wrote in message
>
> ...
> On Feb 17, 5:38 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>
>
> > "MLB" > wrote
>
> > > IMHO Cats in the bathroom seem to be an instinct left over from the
> > > "wild" to protect those other cats in a vulnerable position. After all,
> > > who wants a predator creeping up on a friend who is busy doing what has
> > > to
> > > be done in an awkward position?
>
> > An interesting and plausible theory. Lately our kitten is stalking Gracie
> > when she is in the box. We do have three, but the kitten finds her. I
> > discourage this, to say the least.
> >Interesting. I don't know though... when I am in the BR my cats seem
> >only to be looking for some loving. It seems to me they know I have a
> >few spare moments to love on them. Maybe that is not how it started...
> >But that is at least how it seems now :-)
>
> Oh, I agree, with you and with MLB--I am a Goddess to my cats while on The
> Throne. :) I was bringing up my kitten's behavior as an exception to that..
> And something I have to stay on, because anything that makes a cat
> uncomfortable in the box may cause inappropriate elimination eventually.

I totally agree, cybercat, that could certainly become an issue. I
think you are doing the right thing by discouraging the behavior.

cybercat
February 18th 10, 05:32 AM
"Max" > wrote:
>
>> Oh, I agree, with you and with MLB--I am a Goddess to my cats while on
>> The
>> Throne. :) I was bringing up my kitten's behavior as an exception to
>> that.
>> And something I have to stay on, because anything that makes a cat
>> uncomfortable in the box may cause inappropriate elimination eventually.

>I totally agree, cybercat, that could certainly become an issue. I
>think you are doing the right thing by discouraging the behavior.

I am presently incorporating the "corporal cuddling" deterrent. I scoop up
the kitten when she stalks the box and kiss her and hug her and squeeze her
etc. :)

Max[_2_]
February 18th 10, 05:52 AM
On Feb 17, 11:32*pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Max" > wrote:
>
> >> Oh, I agree, with you and with MLB--I am a Goddess to my cats while on
> >> The
> >> Throne. :) I was bringing up my kitten's behavior as an exception to
> >> that.
> >> And something I have to stay on, because anything that makes a cat
> >> uncomfortable in the box may cause inappropriate elimination eventually.
> >I totally agree, cybercat, that could certainly become an issue. I
> >think you are doing the right thing by discouraging the behavior.
>
> I am presently incorporating the "corporal cuddling" deterrent. I scoop up
> the kitten when she stalks the box and kiss her and hug her and squeeze her
> etc. :)

LOL :-) Good :-)

Let us know if that helps :-) It should :-)

MaryL
February 19th 10, 04:49 AM
"Max" > wrote in message
...
> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> operating under the name "MC".
>
> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> Now I have another question.
>
> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks,
> M

Welcome back! You raise some excellent questions, and your message reminded
me of a thread from several years ago. Here is a response that was posted
then that I thought gave some very helpful information.
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/0d0486868356bc98?hl=en
My first cat was feral. People told me that he would "never" become a
"pet." In actual fact, he became an incredibly loving companion, and he was
with me for almost 20 years. He became an exclusively indoor cat, was
obviously very happy, and he even travelled well with me both by car and
plane (in the cabin). Your cat should be fed good quality canned cat food
(*no grains*) twice a day. Do not leave dry food in the cage.

Good luck, and please keep us updated.

MaryL

Max[_2_]
March 25th 10, 07:06 AM
On Feb 18, 11:49*pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Max" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> > advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> > operating under the name "MC".
>
> > Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>
> > The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
> > to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
> > worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
> > his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
> > any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
> > around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
> > litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>
> > Now I have another question.
>
> > Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
> > cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>
> > I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
> > live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
> > closer to the inside of the trap.
>
> > This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>
> > But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
> > his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
> > He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>
> > My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
> > in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
> > experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
> > it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
> > and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>
> > Any thoughts?
>
> > Thanks,
> > M
>
> Welcome back! *You raise some excellent questions, and your message reminded
> me of a thread from several years ago. *Here is a response that was posted
> then that I thought gave some very helpful information.http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/0d04868...
> My first cat was feral. *People told me that he would "never" become a
> "pet." *In actual fact, he became an incredibly loving companion, and he was
> with me for almost 20 years. *He became an exclusively indoor cat, was
> obviously very happy, and he even travelled well with me both by car and
> plane (in the cabin). *Your cat should be fed good quality canned cat food
> (*no grains*) twice a day. *Do not leave dry food in the cage.
>
> Good luck, and please keep us updated.
>
> MaryL

Hi All Again,

Just an update!

"Kitty" is doing quite well. My husband is in favor of calling him
"Hobo" (because he is/was a feral) and I am still trying to get a feel
for the kitty to give him an appropriate name.

He stayed in our garage for awhile as I was trying to glean the funds
for his first trip to the vets office. He is now up to date on
vaccines and he tested negative for feline leukemia, distemper and
rabies (I had no concerns about distemper or rabies, but still glad to
know all is good there).

In any case, he is around 8 - 9 months of age and still very feral. I
am not sure if it is going to take longer to tame this kitten or for
my two adult indoor only cats to get used to him, which was always a
bit of a concern from the beginning.

I will say that it appears Max and Butterball are adjusting, but I
know it will be an entirely different situation when Kitty gets to
come out of his cage. We are taking baby steps here. Progress is being
made.

In any case, the kitty is in our living room in a fairly small cage.
He no longer tries to "hide" behind the litter box and he certainly
shows an interest in the activities going on in the house. I have
witnessed him trying to get the attention of the other cats, too. I
chuckle when I see his head bobbing up and down in some playful game
and I toss toys to him often, even as he shreds them up during the
night! LOL

I throw him treats when I have to open the door to the cage, as he
still hisses at me. However, I have begun offering him food on the
palm of my hand, which he seems to be very close to taking. When he
first starts taking food from my hand, I do not plan on trying to pet
him, but to give him time to see that I am not out to get him.

Anyway, just wanted to update. We are making progress. Hopefully kitty
will become an really nice house pet. My other two cats are adjusting.

cshenk
March 26th 10, 12:21 AM
"Max" wrote

> > OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
> > advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
> > operating under the name "MC".

Glad to see you! I left this group for a long time because of frustration
but I think I recall your name.

If I'm right, you were one of the nice ones as I adopted a semi-feral cat
and a dog in early 2008.

It worked well (grin).

I am glad you requoted because I wasn't back in here in Feb. Came back in
sometime in March 2010.

(many snippies made)

> In any case, he is around 8 - 9 months of age and still very feral. I
> am not sure if it is going to take longer to tame this kitten or for
> my two adult indoor only cats to get used to him, which was always a
> bit of a concern from the beginning.

A valid concern. He sounds more like a full feral but it is hard to tell.

> I will say that it appears Max and Butterball are adjusting, but I
> know it will be an entirely different situation when Kitty gets to
> come out of his cage. We are taking baby steps here. Progress is being
> made.

Understood. Many web sites tell you to intro a new cat really slowly.
*especially* if semi or full feral. This can involve cages and things like
that that.

I have never used that method. I have converted about 10 (levels differ)
semi-ferals to house pets and 1 that was probably full feral but got him in
early kitten-hood. Before you freak at that number, I am 50 and have had a
multi-cat house all my life so yes, it adds up. Most were not semi-feral
but I brought them into the fold as it were.

> In any case, the kitty is in our living room in a fairly small cage.
> He no longer tries to "hide" behind the litter box and he certainly
> shows an interest in the activities going on in the house. I have

This makes me feel a bit odd but it is the advice on the web. May I infer
the kitty has a much larger space most of the time and is caged just for a
bit? Kinda like intro time? I can only see first post was Feb and now it's
late March.

I *have* caged the more wild semi-ferals for 2-3 weeks for a few hours a day
(then put them in other rooms to let them run about the rest of the day with
no other cats of mine able to get in). Most though, I did not use any cage.
That may not be optimal for your situation.

Side note: Current semi-feral climbed in my lap last night for the first
time in 2 years. She did it once early on just to say 'thanks mom' and now
got a major petting session as she climbed up.

> witnessed him trying to get the attention of the other cats, too. I
> chuckle when I see his head bobbing up and down in some playful game
> and I toss toys to him often, even as he shreds them up during the
> night! LOL

He may be getting lonely. Even ferals want *touch* and if he's not ready
for yours, he wants 'buddies' even if at first once out of the cage with
free run of the house, he hides.

*expect* both hiding *and* 'terratory' issues.

Let me explain from what I have seen. Your existing cats feel all the house
is 'their terratory'. They can't accept the new cat's entry yet because
he's not allowed out of the cage (this is why a room gets closed off for
roaming time then the cat gets fished into a cage. Leave that room OPEN to
existing cats then!). Setup deliberate hidy spots in every room. You dont
have to leave them there forever, but the new one will want them. It's very
important these are newly setup so existing cats don't claim them as 'own
terratory'.

> I throw him treats when I have to open the door to the cage, as he
> still hisses at me. However, I have begun offering him food on the
> palm of my hand, which he seems to be very close to taking. When he
> first starts taking food from my hand, I do not plan on trying to pet
> him, but to give him time to see that I am not out to get him.

Normal. Possibly more to the full feral since not hand eating in a month
(or is it near 2?). It's really hard to tell.

You are going about it right. Just be sure the voice is *soft*. A human at
normal speach to ferals r semi-ferals can come over like 'yelling' and the
higher tenure of a female is sometimes especially problematic.

> Anyway, just wanted to update. We are making progress. Hopefully kitty
> will become an really nice house pet. My other two cats are adjusting.

I'd like to help more but my methods are almost 'instinct' on this. It's
kinda like my daughter Charlotte was born to a house with 2 cats. She
learned to roll over and over and over to chase them then one day stood up
and ran after them. They teased her with a tail 'just out of reach'.

I will try though.

Here is a tip. Before opening the cage for real, do a claw clipping on the
existing house cats. Do not try on the new one (you'll just upset them).

Establish a room (if you have not already) that the new one is allowed to
roam in. Only let other cats in there when new one is free house roaming or
in cage.

*Expect* some hissy fits. There is no way to prevent them. If it stays to
just hissing and chasing, they are just working out things with a new cat.
If the new one looks mostly hunkered down and defensive, he's just waiting
for acceptance.

If he's on the rug hunkered down and reaching up with a claw to defend, he
is afraid of your kitties or trying to tell them that.

Normal is he will run from your kitties for a bit (can be 2 weeks, can be 2
hours) then 'stand fast is my motto'. He'll get pestered at this point then
chase the others in a sort of 'I have had ENOUGH' attitude.

When your's go 'OMG run' it's a good thing. If they stand ground (I am king
of the mountain) it may not be that good.

If the cat comes out of the cage and goes on attack right away, ungood.
That is the crux of the position where web pages fail. Some cats are 'only
cats' who will not tolerate others unless raised from kitten-hood with them.
The incidence of this seems a higher amount with semi-ferals.

I'll add more later if you wish.

cybercat
March 26th 10, 01:57 PM
"Max" > wrote
>Anyway, just wanted to update. We are making progress. Hopefully kitty
>will become an really nice house pet. My other two cats are adjusting.

Beautiful job.

Rockinghorse Winner[_2_]
March 26th 10, 05:36 PM
"Bill Graham" > writes:


>"Max" > wrote in message
...
>> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
>> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
>> operating under the name "MC".
>>
>> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>>
>> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
>> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
>> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
>> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
>> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
>> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
>> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>>
>> Now I have another question.
>>
>> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
>> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>>
>> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
>> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
>> closer to the inside of the trap.
>>
>> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>>
>> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
>> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
>> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>>
>> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
>> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
>> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
>> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
>> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>>
>> Any thoughts?
>>
>> Thanks,
>> M

>Oh.....I forgot to mention....Get him neutered as soon as possible.....This
>will greatly accelerate the taming process....

I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
Patience and love can go a long way.

Matthew[_3_]
March 26th 10, 05:40 PM
"Rockinghorse Winner" > wrote in message
...
> "Bill Graham" > writes:
>
>
>>"Max" > wrote in message
...
>>> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
>>> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
>>> operating under the name "MC".
>>>
>>> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>>>
>>> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
>>> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
>>> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
>>> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
>>> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
>>> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
>>> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>>>
>>> Now I have another question.
>>>
>>> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
>>> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>>>
>>> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
>>> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
>>> closer to the inside of the trap.
>>>
>>> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>>>
>>> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
>>> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
>>> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>>>
>>> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
>>> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
>>> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
>>> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
>>> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>>>
>>> Any thoughts?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> M
>
>>Oh.....I forgot to mention....Get him neutered as soon as
>>possible.....This
>>will greatly accelerate the taming process....
>
> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
> Patience and love can go a long way.
>

Well you would be wrong my friend. I have taken and seen truly feral cats
that have never seen a human before let alone a house and feral cats that
had been hurt by humans become lap cats. It is all with the patience and
understanding of the human plus the cat's attitude so will never be some
will just like people

cshenk
March 26th 10, 10:27 PM
"Matthew" wrote
> "Rockinghorse Winner" wrote

>> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained
>> to
>> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
>> Patience and love can go a long way.

> Well you would be wrong my friend. I have taken and seen truly feral cats
> that have never seen a human before let alone a house and feral cats that
> had been hurt by humans become lap cats. It is all with the patience and
> understanding of the human plus the cat's attitude so will never be some
> will just like people

Exactly, depends on the cat and the new 'parents' as well as the acceptance
on both ends to work it out eventually.

My own experinence is if there is a match in personality going on, then just
patience is needed.

Bill Graham
March 27th 10, 06:50 AM
"Rockinghorse Winner" > wrote in message
...
> "Bill Graham" > writes:
>
>
>>"Max" > wrote in message
...
>>> OK... I have been here before, about a couple of years ago seeking
>>> advice for a cat with urinary tract issues. His name is Max. I was
>>> operating under the name "MC".
>>>
>>> Max and Butterball are doing GREAT!
>>>
>>> The one thing I have to credit this group for is that you all got me
>>> to switch to canned cat food, which I have never regretted. For us, it
>>> worked. It turned out that Max was in reality just really fussy about
>>> his litter box (how full or not full it is) and also very sensitive to
>>> any scents around the house. We have been able to work completely
>>> around the issue of his doing his business in locations other than the
>>> litterbox, and for that I am grateful to this group.
>>>
>>> Now I have another question.
>>>
>>> Recently there has been a stray living on our deck. Perhaps a feral
>>> cat... seems very young - as in maybe less than six months old.
>>>
>>> I FINALLY was able to live trap the cat after a week + of leaving the
>>> live trap out with the cats food, little by little bringing the food
>>> closer to the inside of the trap.
>>>
>>> This morning... SWEET SUCCESS!!!!
>>>
>>> But the cat is terrified. He has not moved from the same spot inside
>>> his new cage all day. He crouches as if to hide behind the litter box.
>>> He/she/it hissed and growled at me as I tried to get friendly with it.
>>>
>>> My question is... What is the best way to acclimate the cat to us, if
>>> in fact it turns out to be a feral cat? Does anyone have direct
>>> experience with this? Shall I get a towel and wrap him/her up and let
>>> it know that way that I am no harm to it? Or is it better to just sit
>>> and spend time with the cat, especially when it is eating food?
>>>
>>> Any thoughts?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> M
>
>>Oh.....I forgot to mention....Get him neutered as soon as
>>possible.....This
>>will greatly accelerate the taming process....
>
> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
> Patience and love can go a long way.
>
Well most people keep indoor cats, and they "tame" ferals simply by trapping
them inside their houses and feeding them until they blend in with the other
cats they have. We have one that we had to tame the hard way, because we had
all outside cats and they all had cat doors front and back to escape
through. So, we just fed him and watered him and let him come in whenever he
wanted to until eventually, after about three years, he began to think he
was just like the others. He would first come in through the open door at
night while we were sleeping, and eat and explore the house. Then I closed
the sliding glass door one evening, trapping him inside the house and he had
to learn to use the cat door in order to escape. After that, he would come
and go as he choose, and today he is just as tame as the other four cats.
but I have to admit that it took a long time that way....It's much faster to
keep them locked inside and they will tame in a couple or three months.

Bill Graham
March 27th 10, 06:55 AM
"cshenk" > wrote in message
...
> "Matthew" wrote
>> "Rockinghorse Winner" wrote
>
>>> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained
>>> to
>>> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
>>> Patience and love can go a long way.
>
>> Well you would be wrong my friend. I have taken and seen truly feral
>> cats that have never seen a human before let alone a house and feral cats
>> that had been hurt by humans become lap cats. It is all with the
>> patience and understanding of the human plus the cat's attitude so will
>> never be some will just like people
>
> Exactly, depends on the cat and the new 'parents' as well as the
> acceptance on both ends to work it out eventually.
>
> My own experinence is if there is a match in personality going on, then
> just patience is needed.
>

Yes. I will never forget the time my wife went out on our back deck and
actually picked up Smokey, our feral visitor, and brought him inside the
house and put him on the bed. I thought for sure he would bite her and run,
but he put up with it, much to my amazement! She has a way with animals that
is hard to believe.....Today, he won't let her out of his sight, and sleeps
by her side every night.

Rockinghorse Winner[_2_]
March 28th 10, 06:44 AM
"Bill Graham" > writes:

>> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
>> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
>> Patience and love can go a long way.
>>
>Well most people keep indoor cats, and they "tame" ferals simply by trapping
>them inside their houses and feeding them until they blend in with the other
>cats they have. We have one that we had to tame the hard way, because we had
>all outside cats and they all had cat doors front and back to escape
>through. So, we just fed him and watered him and let him come in whenever he
>wanted to until eventually, after about three years, he began to think he
>was just like the others. He would first come in through the open door at
>night while we were sleeping, and eat and explore the house. Then I closed
>the sliding glass door one evening, trapping him inside the house and he had
>to learn to use the cat door in order to escape. After that, he would come
>and go as he choose, and today he is just as tame as the other four cats.
>but I have to admit that it took a long time that way....It's much faster to
>keep them locked inside and they will tame in a couple or three months.

Well, you learn something new everyday, and I just learned something new.
Hope you and your feral are doing well.

Max[_2_]
March 29th 10, 05:18 AM
On Mar 28, 1:44*am, Rockinghorse Winner > wrote:
> "Bill Graham" > writes:
> >> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
> >> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
> >> Patience and love can go a long way.
>
> >Well most people keep indoor cats, and they "tame" ferals simply by trapping
> >them inside their houses and feeding them until they blend in with the other
> >cats they have. We have one that we had to tame the hard way, because we had
> >all outside cats and they all had cat doors front and back to escape
> >through. So, we just fed him and watered him and let him come in whenever he
> >wanted to until eventually, after about three years, he began to think he
> >was just like the others. He would first come in through the open door at
> >night while we were sleeping, and eat and explore the house. Then I closed
> >the sliding glass door one evening, trapping him inside the house and he had
> >to learn to use the cat door in order to escape. After that, he would come
> >and go as he choose, and today he is just as tame as the other four cats..
> >but I have to admit that it took a long time that way....It's much faster to
> >keep them locked inside and they will tame in a couple or three months.
>
> Well, you learn something new everyday, and I just learned something new.
> Hope you and your feral are doing well.

Rocking Horse Winner, I love your user name. That was the name of a
story I read when I was much younger, and I have always loved it.

Thanks all for your kind advice. Kitty seems to be coming around, and
then again... I wish I could love and hold him already!

Cshenk, I do remember your name and think you are really awesome to
take in the cats you do. I am glad you have had the success you have
had with your babies. I very much appreciate your thoughts.

I know what you mean, it sounds kind of mean, to keep kitty in a cage
all the time, however, people who have much more experience with this
than I suggested I use a small cage so he gets used to the house and
is not able to hide. My own choice would be to provide a room, or even
the whole house for him and let him adjust at a slower pace, as Bill
Graham suggests. However, I understand that could take years... so in
the long run, it seems better to get him over it more quickly.

If I let him go in a room, or the house, I would never catch him
again. How would I get him moved from one cage to the room and back
again. You know what I mean? I would have no way of getting him back
in the cage. I doubt I would ever see him again. He is that spooky. He
would simply hide under a hidey spot and never come out when I was
around. I feel it would take many years to even catch site of him
again.

Now he takes an active interest in the other cats... and he even shows
interest in me, however, if I approach the cage a little too quickly,
even with treats and foods, he still hisses.

He is very close to taking food from my hand at this point. He hasn't
yet, but we are working at that. Once he is comfortable taking food
from my hand, after a little bit I will try to pet him.

Once I can comfortably pet him I think I will feel comfortable giving
him his own room, or even the house, should he get along OK with the
other cats in this house.

I think he shows a lot of promise, lots of personality. The
expressions on his face are so funny!

Thanks so much to all of you for your thoughts :-)

Max[_2_]
March 29th 10, 06:13 AM
On Mar 29, 12:18*am, Max > wrote:
> On Mar 28, 1:44*am, Rockinghorse Winner > wrote:
>
>
>
> > "Bill Graham" > writes:
> > >> I don't think a truly feral cat can ever be tame. But it can be trained to
> > >> be as little a nuisance as the poor thing can be, given it's upbringing.
> > >> Patience and love can go a long way.
>
> > >Well most people keep indoor cats, and they "tame" ferals simply by trapping
> > >them inside their houses and feeding them until they blend in with the other
> > >cats they have. We have one that we had to tame the hard way, because we had
> > >all outside cats and they all had cat doors front and back to escape
> > >through. So, we just fed him and watered him and let him come in whenever he
> > >wanted to until eventually, after about three years, he began to think he
> > >was just like the others. He would first come in through the open door at
> > >night while we were sleeping, and eat and explore the house. Then I closed
> > >the sliding glass door one evening, trapping him inside the house and he had
> > >to learn to use the cat door in order to escape. After that, he would come
> > >and go as he choose, and today he is just as tame as the other four cats.
> > >but I have to admit that it took a long time that way....It's much faster to
> > >keep them locked inside and they will tame in a couple or three months..
>
> > Well, you learn something new everyday, and I just learned something new.
> > Hope you and your feral are doing well.
>
> Rocking Horse Winner, I love your user name. That was the name of a
> story I read when I was much younger, and I have always loved it.
>
> Thanks all for your kind advice. Kitty seems to be coming around, and
> then again... I wish I could love and hold him already!
>
> Cshenk, I do remember your name and think you are really awesome to
> take in the cats you do. I am glad you have had the success you have
> had with your babies. I very much appreciate your thoughts.
>
> I know what you mean, it sounds kind of mean, to keep kitty in a cage
> all the time, however, people who have much more experience with this
> than I suggested I use a small cage so he gets used to the house and
> is not able to hide. My own choice would be to provide a room, or even
> the whole house for him and let him adjust at a slower pace, as Bill
> Graham suggests. However, I understand that could take years... so in
> the long run, it seems better to get him over it more quickly.
>
> If I let him go in a room, or the house, I would never catch him
> again. How would I get him moved from one cage to the room and back
> again. You know what I mean? I would have no way of getting him back
> in the cage. I doubt I would ever see him again. He is that spooky. He
> would simply hide under a hidey spot and never come out when I was
> around. I feel it would take many years to even catch site of him
> again.
>
> Now he takes an active interest in the other cats... and he even shows
> interest in me, however, if I approach the cage a little too quickly,
> even with treats and foods, he still hisses.
>
> He is very close to taking food from my hand at this point. He hasn't
> yet, but we are working at that. Once he is comfortable taking food
> from my hand, after a little bit I will try to pet him.
>
> Once I can comfortably pet him I think I will feel comfortable giving
> him his own room, or even the house, should he get along OK with the
> other cats in this house.
>
> I think he shows a lot of promise, lots of personality. The
> expressions on his face are so funny!
>
> Thanks so much to all of you for your thoughts :-)

Cshenk... Kitty has been with us for about six weeks now.

The good news is that tonight he ate his food with me sitting there.
He would not eat from my hand, but I am going to especially work on
that this week. He ate his food and didn't appear troubled by my being
there. This was the first time I was able to watch him eat at such
close range.

cybercat
March 29th 10, 07:03 AM
"Max" > wrote
>The good news is that tonight he ate his food with me sitting there.
>He would not eat from my hand, but I am going to especially work on
>that this week.

I wouldn't push that. Most cats don't like that. You are doing great right
now! Kudos to you.

cshenk
March 30th 10, 03:00 AM
"Max" wrote

> Thanks all for your kind advice. Kitty seems to be coming around, and
> then again... I wish I could love and hold him already!

All cats are loveable ;-)

> Cshenk, I do remember your name and think you are really awesome to
> take in the cats you do. I am glad you have had the success you have
> had with your babies. I very much appreciate your thoughts.

Glad to help! It's often hard for me to explain things right the first time
so don't be bashful if I seem to be confusing. I promise to do my best to
help and understand and will ask if i am not sure what you seem to be
saying.

> I know what you mean, it sounds kind of mean, to keep kitty in a cage
> all the time, however, people who have much more experience with this
> than I suggested I use a small cage so he gets used to the house and
> is not able to hide.

I have seen that and there are plusses and minus factors to it. I've not
done it myself, but I was already an experienced cat owner before I took on
my first feral and that was a kitten in a full body cast (long story, not
for just now as not related).

I think I was too experienced to use that method by the time I heard about
it. That doesn't make you bad. I see nothing to indicate you do not mean
the best for the new one and aren't taking care of them. Although i am not
'holistic' I think cats definately catch good vibes in intentions.

I do worry at 'small cage'. If he's in there more than a few hours, it
needs to be pretty big. Like, 3ftx2ft and 2ft tall minimum. Also the metal
grate type so they can see out all around on all 4 sides. Cat raising
instinct there. They like 'small dens' but not 'can't get out and roam'.

> My own choice would be to provide a room, or even
> the whole house for him and let him adjust at a slower pace, as Bill
> Graham suggests. However, I understand that could take years... so in
> the long run, it seems better to get him over it more quickly.

There are many personalities in cats. What Bill and I are talking about is
a bit different. See, if i tracked right he's talking 'tamed' which just
means doesn't scratch the heck out you and lets you feed them. My posts
(WOW etc) relate to the later stages of adaption by a clearly human abused
cat who was also a high-feral rate sort. She was 'tame' within 3 weeks with
us but sleeping with the dog within 3 nights of getting here (grin).

> If I let him go in a room, or the house, I would never catch him
> again. How would I get him moved from one cage to the room and back
> again. You know what I mean? I would have no way of getting him back
> in the cage. I doubt I would ever see him again. He is that spooky. He
> would simply hide under a hidey spot and never come out when I was
> around. I feel it would take many years to even catch site of him
> again.

Smile, Daisy was 18 months in 6 foster homes over this. By the time she
unhid on them, they gave up a week later because she wasn't a lap kitty and
didnt associate with humans well. In reality, she just needed time, gentle
voices, and hidy holes in every room (and you let the cat *be* there without
trying to coax them out). Oh, memory spark, had to remind husband on that.
He wanted to sit there before Daisy's hidy hole and coo softly at her. I
had to remind him, she'd come out when *she* was ready and just let it
happen, next week, month or whatever. I reminded him of Vamp-kitty (a
previous feral I had when we married) and how he hid when Don first moved in
and how I had Don setup 'kitty blinds' with his fishing boxes for him to
hide in. Lightbulb lit. (It actually took 5 weeks for Vamp to jump Don's
tummy in the night and nuzzle down and after that, he became Don's cat.
Murpmfp).

Yes, you won't see the cat right away. You may not see them for a week or
more. *it's ok*.

> Now he takes an active interest in the other cats... and he even shows
> interest in me, however, if I approach the cage a little too quickly,
> even with treats and foods, he still hisses.

Yes, small gentle moves. Voice is *critical*. Dont whisper, but use your
softer 'man voice'. Sorry, instinct again and not sure where I learned that.
Female voices tend to be more an issue than male ones. Something about
higher pitch sets them on edge a tad?

I've never tried this adaption with a cage. I've always picked a room last
used by the other cats and setup 'cat hidy holes' and let the new one free
in there (extra liter box there too). For 3 days or so, I sometimes put up
2 of those child gates that use a sort of tension rod to hold up (one above
another to make about a 6ft gate). That blocked lesser room let the new one
'establish terratory' in a spot the others didnt use. Gates down pretty
fast after that time.

> He is very close to taking food from my hand at this point. He hasn't
> yet, but we are working at that. Once he is comfortable taking food
> from my hand, after a little bit I will try to pet him.

Umm, how many weeks now? I'll add I never worried if they would take food
from my hand. Pretty sure Daisy will. Now Cash-pup? I'd wanna count my
fingers after! At this stage, dropping a ew bits for her then standing back
is normal. He will smell it came from you and if he wants more, will come a
little closer then meow a little. *bring a few mre kibble but do not try to
pet yet*.

When the cat is ready for a pet, they will come brush up to you. Dont grab,
or try to pickup. Just let it happen at the cat's speed which will be
faster than if you try to speed it.

> Once I can comfortably pet him I think I will feel comfortable giving
> him his own room, or even the house, should he get along OK with the
> other cats in this house.

I am sory, this method is so different from my own, I don't really know how
to work it. My instincts say you will not get able to pet him while he's
still in a cage. It's a mini terratory of all his own and no one is allowed
in which I think will get worse if allowed too long?

> I think he shows a lot of promise, lots of personality. The
> expressions on his face are so funny!

I think so too! I think all will be well also.

cshenk
March 30th 10, 03:47 AM
"cybercat" wrote>
> "Max" wrote

>>The good news is that tonight he ate his food with me sitting there.
>>He would not eat from my hand, but I am going to especially work on
>>that this week.
>
> I wouldn't push that. Most cats don't like that. You are doing great right
> now! Kudos to you.

Agreed. (Max, dogs eat out of your hand, cats do not normally and it's not
lack of accptance just that you have odd ones who do if so).