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Mark Earnest
March 12th 10, 10:52 PM
Anyone know of any?

I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.

I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
here recommed that.

What is the cure?

Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
awhile.

Christine BA[_3_]
March 13th 10, 12:22 AM
12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
> Anyone know of any?
>
> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>
> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
> here recommed that.
>
> What is the cure?
>
> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
> awhile.
>

Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
ingest loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that
looks much more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still
they're called hairBALLS.

This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your kitty
regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
where it has the greatest effect...

--
Christine in Finland
christal63 (at) gmail (dot) com

Mark Earnest
March 13th 10, 02:11 AM
"Christine BA" > wrote in message
...
> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>> Anyone know of any?
>>
>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>
>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>> here recommed that.
>>
>> What is the cure?
>>
>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>> awhile.
>>
>
> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to ingest
> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks much
> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
> hairBALLS.
>
> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your kitty
> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
> where it has the greatest effect...

Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
No surgery required, that is.
My cat sure likes the brush.

Mark

Christine BA[_3_]
March 13th 10, 08:58 AM
13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
> "Christine > wrote in message
> ...
>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>
>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>
>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>> here recommed that.
>>>
>>> What is the cure?
>>>
>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>> awhile.
>>>
>>
>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to ingest
>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks much
>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
>> hairBALLS.
>>
>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your kitty
>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
>> where it has the greatest effect...
>
> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
> No surgery required, that is.
> My cat sure likes the brush.
>
> Mark
>

In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests a
lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the intestines
can get clogged with it when trying to process it in the normal fashion.
But then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as the passages are
full of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry, but vomits the
food unprocessed as the food cannot enter the intestines. That's when
surgery can be required.

--
Christine in Finland
christal63 (at) gmail (dot) com

Mark Earnest
March 13th 10, 09:07 AM
"Christine BA" > wrote in message
...
> 13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>> "Christine > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>>
>>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>>
>>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>>> here recommed that.
>>>>
>>>> What is the cure?
>>>>
>>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>>> awhile.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
>>> ingest
>>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks
>>> much
>>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
>>> hairBALLS.
>>>
>>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your kitty
>>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
>>> where it has the greatest effect...
>>
>> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
>> No surgery required, that is.
>> My cat sure likes the brush.
>>
>> Mark
>>
>
> In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests a
> lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the intestines can
> get clogged with it when trying to process it in the normal fashion. But
> then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as the passages are full
> of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry, but vomits the food
> unprocessed as the food cannot enter the intestines. That's when surgery
> can be required.
>
> --
> Christine in Finland
> christal63 (at) gmail (dot) com

Thank you again Christine in Finland. It's been about ten years
since I exchanged words with anyone from that country.
I'll just have to keep on brushing the cat, then.
That is the first time she ever came when I called her,
when I promised to brush her.

Mark
USA

Bill Graham
March 13th 10, 11:32 PM
"Christine BA" > wrote in message
...
> 13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>> "Christine > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>>
>>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>>
>>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>>> here recommed that.
>>>>
>>>> What is the cure?
>>>>
>>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>>> awhile.
>>>>
>>>
>>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
>>> ingest
>>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks
>>> much
>>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
>>> hairBALLS.
>>>
>>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your kitty
>>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
>>> where it has the greatest effect...
>>
>> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
>> No surgery required, that is.
>> My cat sure likes the brush.
>>
>> Mark
>>
>
> In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests a
> lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the intestines can
> get clogged with it when trying to process it in the normal fashion. But
> then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as the passages are full
> of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry, but vomits the food
> unprocessed as the food cannot enter the intestines. That's when surgery
> can be required.
>
Yes. A couple of years ago Meggie, our long haired female, got one that made
her stomach grow bigger and bigger as she ate......We thought she had a
tumor......Pretty soon, she stopped eating altogether, and the vet came and
took her away for an operation.They thought it was a cancer and told us that
they would cut it out if it was contained, and put her to sleep if it had
metastasized. We were quite relieved to find out that it was just a huge
hairball in her stomach. The vet said that it was the biggest hairball they
had ever seen. The operation cost us over $800, but Meggie is a great cat
and she was worth it. Now, we brush her regularly and keep a small dish of
butter for her (and the other cats) to lick when they are on the table.

Mark Earnest
March 14th 10, 12:41 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Christine BA" > wrote in message
> ...
>> 13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>> "Christine > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>>>
>>>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>>>
>>>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>>>> here recommed that.
>>>>>
>>>>> What is the cure?
>>>>>
>>>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>>>> awhile.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>>>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
>>>> ingest
>>>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks
>>>> much
>>>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
>>>> hairBALLS.
>>>>
>>>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your
>>>> kitty
>>>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>>>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some such
>>>> where it has the greatest effect...
>>>
>>> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
>>> No surgery required, that is.
>>> My cat sure likes the brush.
>>>
>>> Mark
>>>
>>
>> In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests a
>> lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the intestines
>> can get clogged with it when trying to process it in the normal fashion.
>> But then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as the passages are
>> full of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry, but vomits the food
>> unprocessed as the food cannot enter the intestines. That's when surgery
>> can be required.
>>
> Yes. A couple of years ago Meggie, our long haired female, got one that
> made her stomach grow bigger and bigger as she ate......We thought she had
> a tumor......Pretty soon, she stopped eating altogether, and the vet came
> and took her away for an operation.They thought it was a cancer and told
> us that they would cut it out if it was contained, and put her to sleep if
> it had metastasized. We were quite relieved to find out that it was just a
> huge hairball in her stomach. The vet said that it was the biggest
> hairball they had ever seen. The operation cost us over $800, but Meggie
> is a great cat and she was worth it. Now, we brush her regularly and keep
> a small dish of butter for her (and the other cats) to lick when they are
> on the table.

What is the butter for?
Is Meggie a long haired cat?
>

Bill Graham
March 14th 10, 12:57 AM
"Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
netamerica...
>
> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Christine BA" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>> 13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>> "Christine > wrote in message
>>>> ...
>>>>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>>>>> here recommed that.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> What is the cure?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>>>>> awhile.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>>>>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
>>>>> ingest
>>>>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks
>>>>> much
>>>>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're called
>>>>> hairBALLS.
>>>>>
>>>>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your
>>>>> kitty
>>>>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>>>>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some
>>>>> such
>>>>> where it has the greatest effect...
>>>>
>>>> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
>>>> No surgery required, that is.
>>>> My cat sure likes the brush.
>>>>
>>>> Mark
>>>>
>>>
>>> In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests a
>>> lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the intestines
>>> can get clogged with it when trying to process it in the normal fashion.
>>> But then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as the passages are
>>> full of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry, but vomits the
>>> food unprocessed as the food cannot enter the intestines. That's when
>>> surgery can be required.
>>>
>> Yes. A couple of years ago Meggie, our long haired female, got one that
>> made her stomach grow bigger and bigger as she ate......We thought she
>> had a tumor......Pretty soon, she stopped eating altogether, and the vet
>> came and took her away for an operation.They thought it was a cancer and
>> told us that they would cut it out if it was contained, and put her to
>> sleep if it had metastasized. We were quite relieved to find out that it
>> was just a huge hairball in her stomach. The vet said that it was the
>> biggest hairball they had ever seen. The operation cost us over $800, but
>> Meggie is a great cat and she was worth it. Now, we brush her regularly
>> and keep a small dish of butter for her (and the other cats) to lick when
>> they are on the table.
>
> What is the butter for?


Butter (which they like) helps keep the hairs they swallow from stopping up
in their gastro intestinal track, and facilitates them passing through their
systems.

> Is Meggie a long haired cat?

Yup. My first sentence above.........

Mark Earnest
March 14th 10, 04:00 AM
"Bill Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
> netamerica...
>>
>> "Bill Graham" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>> "Christine BA" > wrote in message
>>> ...
>>>> 13.3.2010 3:11, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>>> "Christine > wrote in message
>>>>> ...
>>>>>> 12.3.2010 23:52, Mark Earnest kirjoitti:
>>>>>>> Anyone know of any?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'm trying to find out what in the jungle is a hairball.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I purchased a brush to try to stop them, since someone
>>>>>>> here recommed that.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> What is the cure?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Fortunately I have a teenage (6 month old) cat, so it may be
>>>>>>> awhile.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Just in case you're actually serious I'll try to explain it to you.
>>>>>> When a cat washes itself, it licks its fur. This causes the cat to
>>>>>> ingest
>>>>>> loose fur. Sometimes cats then vomit this fur as something that looks
>>>>>> much
>>>>>> more like an oblong squishy poop than a ball, but still they're
>>>>>> called
>>>>>> hairBALLS.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This is why it was recommended that you get a brush and brush your
>>>>>> kitty
>>>>>> regularly, so it wouldn't ingest so much fur when washing itself and
>>>>>> subsequently vomit it (usually) on a carpet or into a shoe or some
>>>>>> such
>>>>>> where it has the greatest effect...
>>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, Christine. I'm glad its not as serious as I thought.
>>>>> No surgery required, that is.
>>>>> My cat sure likes the brush.
>>>>>
>>>>> Mark
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> In the worst case scenario, it CAN require surgery. If the cat ingests
>>>> a lot of fur, cannot hurk it up on your favourite carpet, the
>>>> intestines can get clogged with it when trying to process it in the
>>>> normal fashion. But then the cat can neither eat nor poop normally, as
>>>> the passages are full of fur. Kitty tries to eat, as it's very hungry,
>>>> but vomits the food unprocessed as the food cannot enter the
>>>> intestines. That's when surgery can be required.
>>>>
>>> Yes. A couple of years ago Meggie, our long haired female, got one that
>>> made her stomach grow bigger and bigger as she ate......We thought she
>>> had a tumor......Pretty soon, she stopped eating altogether, and the vet
>>> came and took her away for an operation.They thought it was a cancer and
>>> told us that they would cut it out if it was contained, and put her to
>>> sleep if it had metastasized. We were quite relieved to find out that it
>>> was just a huge hairball in her stomach. The vet said that it was the
>>> biggest hairball they had ever seen. The operation cost us over $800,
>>> but Meggie is a great cat and she was worth it. Now, we brush her
>>> regularly and keep a small dish of butter for her (and the other cats)
>>> to lick when they are on the table.
>>
>> What is the butter for?
>
>
> Butter (which they like) helps keep the hairs they swallow from stopping
> up in their gastro intestinal track, and facilitates them passing through
> their systems.

Neat trick. I wish I had thought of that. I use olive oil spread, I hope
that works. They won't pig out on it, will they?

>
>> Is Meggie a long haired cat?
>
> Yup. My first sentence above.........

OK, I missed that :)

Bill Graham
March 15th 10, 04:28 AM
"Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
ca...
> Neat trick. I wish I had thought of that. I use olive oil spread, I hope
> that works. They won't pig out on it, will they?

They don't seem to....The vet suggested it to me, and I knew they liked
butter, cause they liked to lick my toast in the morning, so I put some in a
dish for them to lick, and it seems to work, cause they haven't had to have
any hairball surgery for the last couple of years......But I brush 'em too,
so maybe the butter doesn't do anything at all.......

dgk
March 15th 10, 04:49 PM
On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:28:32 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
wrote:

>
>"Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
ca...
>> Neat trick. I wish I had thought of that. I use olive oil spread, I hope
>> that works. They won't pig out on it, will they?
>
>They don't seem to....The vet suggested it to me, and I knew they liked
>butter, cause they liked to lick my toast in the morning, so I put some in a
>dish for them to lick, and it seems to work, cause they haven't had to have
>any hairball surgery for the last couple of years......But I brush 'em too,
>so maybe the butter doesn't do anything at all.......


Cat grass seems to help a lot also, or even normal grass. I have the
yard fenced in so they can't escape and I let them go out as often as
possible, but sometimes work and weather gang up - particularly in the
winter when it gets dark so early. But after a week or so of not
letting them out, they go out, eat grass, and later on I find a
hairball or two in the house mixed up with grass. The grass seems to
trigger them to upchuck a bit and out goes the hairball.

None of my cats has hairballs very often, in fact if I find more than
three or four a month (with three cats) it's unusual. So the fact that
I've noted a correlation between them eating grass and losing a
hairball is significant to me.

I don't know why they call them hairballs. Hairslugs is more to the
point.

Bill Graham
March 15th 10, 06:16 PM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 14 Mar 2010 20:28:32 -0700, "Bill Graham" >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"Mark Earnest" > wrote in message
ca...
>>> Neat trick. I wish I had thought of that. I use olive oil spread, I
>>> hope
>>> that works. They won't pig out on it, will they?
>>
>>They don't seem to....The vet suggested it to me, and I knew they liked
>>butter, cause they liked to lick my toast in the morning, so I put some in
>>a
>>dish for them to lick, and it seems to work, cause they haven't had to
>>have
>>any hairball surgery for the last couple of years......But I brush 'em
>>too,
>>so maybe the butter doesn't do anything at all.......
>
>
> Cat grass seems to help a lot also, or even normal grass. I have the
> yard fenced in so they can't escape and I let them go out as often as
> possible, but sometimes work and weather gang up - particularly in the
> winter when it gets dark so early. But after a week or so of not
> letting them out, they go out, eat grass, and later on I find a
> hairball or two in the house mixed up with grass. The grass seems to
> trigger them to upchuck a bit and out goes the hairball.
>
> None of my cats has hairballs very often, in fact if I find more than
> three or four a month (with three cats) it's unusual. So the fact that
> I've noted a correlation between them eating grass and losing a
> hairball is significant to me.
>
> I don't know why they call them hairballs. Hairslugs is more to the
> point.

Yes.....Meggie's hairball was a mixture of hair, grass, and normal stomach
contents.....She did eat grass in an attempt to get rid of it, but it gained
on her........:^)