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-   -   Controlling fleas by humidity (http://www.catbanter.com/showthread.php?t=111567)

John Doe[_2_] August 19th 14 11:44 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal
thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as
needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds
like a great solution. No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.

John Doe[_2_] August 31st 14 09:10 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
Yes! Looking better. Keep the humidity below 50% and your inside
cats have no fleas! No fleas means no scabby cat disease (if fleas
are the cause). Besides, fleas are creepy. Reducing the humidity
also helps reduce mold and stuff.

Using the air conditioner has done it so far. But fall/winter is
coming so I might buy a dehumidifier soon. Then the question
becomes exactly how low the humidity must be, and how often and
for how long the dehumidifier must be run in order to keep any
stray flea from reproducing. And that only when the humidity is
above 50%.






I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a
seasonal thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a
dehumidifier as needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50%
nukes fleas. Sounds like a great solution. No steroids. No
chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.



John Doe[_2_] November 5th 14 06:41 AM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
Since it's cooling off, I have been using a dehumidifier.
Apparently fleas are still unable to reproduce. Even if fleas
get in, they don't propagate. Quite cool IMO.






Yes! Looking better. Keep the humidity below 50% and your inside
cats have no fleas! No fleas means no scabby cat disease (if
fleas are the cause). Besides, fleas are creepy. Reducing the
humidity also helps reduce mold and stuff.

Using the air conditioner has done it so far. But fall/winter is
coming so I might buy a dehumidifier soon. Then the question
becomes exactly how low the humidity must be, and how often and
for how long the dehumidifier must be run in order to keep any
stray flea from reproducing. And that only when the humidity is
above 50%.






I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a
seasonal thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a
dehumidifier as needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50%
nukes fleas. Sounds like a great solution. No steroids. No
chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.




John Doe[_2_] December 16th 14 01:24 AM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
To continue following up...

The humidity meter plus dehumidifier keeping the humidity below 50% has
nuked my male cat's scabby cat disease symptoms that were clearly caused by
fleas. His coat has never been as complete and thick as it is now.

No more fleas, no more excessive licking. Without pesticides, without
steroids, works on every cat in the area without intervention. I think it's
really cool.





I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal
thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as
needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds
like a great solution. No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.



dgk December 17th 14 02:58 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 00:24:46 +0000 (UTC), John Doe
wrote:

To continue following up...

The humidity meter plus dehumidifier keeping the humidity below 50% has
nuked my male cat's scabby cat disease symptoms that were clearly caused by
fleas. His coat has never been as complete and thick as it is now.

No more fleas, no more excessive licking. Without pesticides, without
steroids, works on every cat in the area without intervention. I think it's
really cool.





I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal
thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as
needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds
like a great solution. No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.


Thanks for the hint. I've only once had fleas on the cats but maybe I
have low humidity. I'll keep an eye on it.

John Doe[_2_] December 17th 14 08:01 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
dgk wrote:

John Doe wrote:
John Doe wrote:


I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal
thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as
needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds
like a great solution. No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.


To continue following up...

The humidity meter plus dehumidifier keeping the humidity below 50%
has nuked my male cat's scabby cat disease symptoms that were clearly
caused by fleas. His coat has never been as complete and thick as it
is now.

No more fleas, no more excessive licking. Without pesticides, without
steroids, works on every cat in the area without intervention. I think
it's really cool.


Thanks for the hint. I've only once had fleas on the cats but maybe I
have low humidity. I'll keep an eye on it.


I do well at observation/awareness, but apparently fleas can stay under
my radar. There have been very few times when I've actually observed
fleas in the house or on my cats. But this dehumidifier experiment
indicates that fleas have been present at times when I was unaware of
them. Some probably still enter the house, but the humidity control
prevents them from breeding. And that is doing wonders for my male cat.

Yes, at least by an inexpensive humidity meter for the area of concern.
It's fun to watch the humidity rise and fall. When it's over 50%, the
fleas are breeding. And speaking of humid areas, apparently they have a
horrible time in Florida with fleas.

John Doe[_2_] December 19th 14 07:35 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
I do believe that fleas were my male cat's problem, but also possible is
reducing airborne allergens by keeping humidity in check. It probably
was fleas, but in any case I'm convinced that keeping humidity below 50%
for many months is responsible for greatly improving my cat's skin
condition.

Start by buying yourself a cheap humidity meter! Or buy two, to check
that it's reasonably accurate.

When it's cold, keeping your house warm apparently will keep the
humidity low. Static electricity indicates very low humidity.
Conversely, in the summer so will running your air conditioner. Check it
and see!



keywords... scabby cat disease fleas skin condition causes excessive
licking feline eczema miliary dermatitis lesions millet seeds crusty
scabs frequent grooming chewing relieve itching irritation extreme
itchiness constant scratching severe infections infestations insects
mites lice underlying cause bacterial fungal yeast allergy allergies
hypoallergenic diet parasites rinses shampoos sprays powders worms








I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by humidity.
We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air conditioner a
lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin condition has
improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal thing. I'll be
prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as needed. Apparently
keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds like a great solution.
No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.



whisky-dave January 6th 15 04:34 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 
On Friday, 19 December 2014 18:35:35 UTC, John Doe wrote:
I do believe that fleas were my male cat's problem, but also possible is
reducing airborne allergens by keeping humidity in check. It probably
was fleas, but in any case I'm convinced that keeping humidity below 50%
for many months is responsible for greatly improving my cat's skin
condition.

Start by buying yourself a cheap humidity meter! Or buy two, to check
that it's reasonably accurate.

When it's cold, keeping your house warm apparently will keep the
humidity low. Static electricity indicates very low humidity.
Conversely, in the summer so will running your air conditioner. Check it
and see!


I have RL at about 25%-38% since mid december and my cat has fleas and is an indoor cat only venturing out as little as 10 mins every two weeks or so.
Low humitidy 20% is bad for humans in that it cam lead to dry skin, headaches and various other alments aren't helped by low humidity.

I can't see how or why fleas would be that concerened with humidity.


keywords... scabby cat disease fleas skin condition causes excessive
licking feline eczema miliary dermatitis lesions millet seeds crusty
scabs frequent grooming chewing relieve itching irritation extreme
itchiness constant scratching severe infections infestations insects
mites lice underlying cause bacterial fungal yeast allergy allergies
hypoallergenic diet parasites rinses shampoos sprays powders worms








I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by humidity.
We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air conditioner a
lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin condition has
improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal thing. I'll be
prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as needed. Apparently
keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds like a great solution.
No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.



Christina Websell April 19th 15 09:34 PM

Controlling fleas by humidity
 

"John Doe" wrote in message
...
I just got wind of the idea that fleas can be controlled by
humidity. We have a very hot summer and I've been using the air
conditioner a lot. It removes tons of water. My male cat's skin
condition has improved to nearly 100%. Apparently it's a seasonal
thing. I'll be prepared from now on. Will use a dehumidifier as
needed. Apparently keeping humidity below 50% nukes fleas. Sounds
like a great solution. No steroids. No chemicals.

Just bought a humidity meter.


No fleas can survive my house because it's cold. Even today it was only 9C
Bad luck those fleas.
I never get them.






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