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Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 25th 11, 02:17 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
[email protected]
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Posts: 185
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

On Jun 19, 12:55*pm, "CatNipped" wrote:
I hate, hate HATE those companies that not only require a certain number of
characters, but refuse passwords that are recent repeats of past passwords
(like 20 passwords back, or won't allow consesequitive letters, or common
words, or anything at ALL easily memorable - no wonder I can't ever get into
the same place twice. *What the heck do they care if I get "hacked", that's
*NY* problem, and besides, the passwords I use and remember couldn't
possibly be figured out by anyone but me and *maybe* Ben. *Who the hell are
they to tell me what's a proper password for me??!!

/password rant


I come up with passwords that mean something to me, but are not normal
names by themselves. And then I send myself an email with my username
and password hint. The hint makes perfect sense to me, so I don't have
to include the actual password. It could be a letter and the # sign,
and I know what name and number that is. It could be old goal or new
goal, and I know what that means.

At work, I keep it very simple as 3 of use the same account, and I
really doubt somebody wants to hack into the deli department account.
So I have an easy word, punctuation, and a number, and the number
goes up by a specific number every time it requires a password change.
That way, the other clerks can easily guess the new password if they
find it has changed.

I also like to answer security questions wrong, so that I know the
correct answer, but it isn't easily obvious. For example, I don't use
my sister's middle name for that question. I use somebody else;s
middle name. I don't use my first pet, etc.

  #2  
Old June 25th 11, 02:39 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
Bill Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,065
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

wrote:
On Jun 19, 12:55 pm, "CatNipped" wrote:
I hate, hate HATE those companies that not only require a certain
number of characters, but refuse passwords that are recent repeats
of past passwords (like 20 passwords back, or won't allow
consesequitive letters, or common words, or anything at ALL easily
memorable - no wonder I can't ever get into the same place twice.
What the heck do they care if I get "hacked", that's *NY* problem,
and besides, the passwords I use and remember couldn't possibly be
figured out by anyone but me and *maybe* Ben. Who the hell are they
to tell me what's a proper password for me??!!

/password rant


I come up with passwords that mean something to me, but are not normal
names by themselves. And then I send myself an email with my username
and password hint. The hint makes perfect sense to me, so I don't have
to include the actual password. It could be a letter and the # sign,
and I know what name and number that is. It could be old goal or new
goal, and I know what that means.

At work, I keep it very simple as 3 of use the same account, and I
really doubt somebody wants to hack into the deli department account.
So I have an easy word, punctuation, and a number, and the number
goes up by a specific number every time it requires a password change.
That way, the other clerks can easily guess the new password if they
find it has changed.

I also like to answer security questions wrong, so that I know the
correct answer, but it isn't easily obvious. For example, I don't use
my sister's middle name for that question. I use somebody else;s
middle name. I don't use my first pet, etc.


Yes. Well, passwords vary in their importance. You can use simple ones for
unimportant things, but for the important stuff, it's good to have a
password that's difficult to figure out. and, it these important ones that I
would like to encode so that I can figure them out on the spot based on the
information I have rather than sheer memory, but nobody else could. - It
would be completely raqndom to anyone who doesn't know my "system", and that
way, I wouldn't have to write anything down. My problem with writing stuff
down is twqfold, I would misplace the book and not be able to enter my own
accounts, and/or someone else would break into my house when I am gone asnd
get all my passwords out of the book. In either case, I don't like the idea
of writing therm down in a book.
There used to be a physicist...A Niobel prize winner, and he liked to break
into his co-workers safes, just as an exercise. Most of the time, he would
find their combination taped underneath their middle desk drawer, or some
similoar place in their office. He knew very little about safes and how
they worked, but he knew a lot about his co-workers minds and how they
worked, which, it turnes out, was just as good if not better. This guys name
was Richard P. Feynman, and he wrote several books which are all a good
read. He was an excellent teacher, and anyone can learn a lot from his
books, even if they are not scientifically oriented.

  #3  
Old June 25th 11, 02:53 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 185
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

On Jun 24, 6:39*pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:
wrote:
On Jun 19, 12:55 pm, "CatNipped" wrote:
I hate, hate HATE those companies that not only require a certain
number of characters, but refuse passwords that are recent repeats
of past passwords (like 20 passwords back, or won't allow
consesequitive letters, or common words, or anything at ALL easily
memorable - no wonder I can't ever get into the same place twice.
What the heck do they care if I get "hacked", that's *NY* problem,
and besides, the passwords I use and remember couldn't possibly be
figured out by anyone but me and *maybe* Ben. Who the hell are they
to tell me what's a proper password for me??!!


/password rant


I come up with passwords that mean something to me, but are not normal
names by themselves. And then I send myself an email with my username
and password hint. The hint makes perfect sense to me, so I don't have
to include the actual password. It could be a letter and the # sign,
and I know what name and number that is. It could be old goal or new
goal, and I know what that means.


At work, I keep it very simple as 3 of use the same account, and I
really doubt somebody wants to hack into the deli department account.
So I have an easy word, punctuation, * and a number, and the number
goes up by a specific number every time it requires a password change.
That way, the other clerks can easily guess the new password if they
find it has changed.


I also like to answer security questions wrong, so that I know the
correct answer, but it isn't easily obvious. For example, I don't use
my sister's middle name for that question. I use somebody else;s
middle name. I don't use my first pet, etc.


Yes. Well, passwords vary in their importance. You can use simple ones for
unimportant things, but for the important stuff, it's good to have a
password that's difficult to figure out. and, it these important ones that I
would like to encode so that I can figure them out on the spot based on the
information I have rather than sheer memory, but nobody else could. - It
would be completely raqndom to anyone who doesn't know my "system", and that
way, I wouldn't have to write anything down. My problem with writing stuff
down is twqfold, I would misplace the book and not be able to enter my own
accounts, and/or someone else would break into my house when I am gone asnd
get all my passwords out of the book. In either case, I don't like the idea
of writing therm down in a book.


This is why I send myself an email and save it in a special location.
And the email contains the username and a hint. No actual password.
And I know what the hint means. I have made up numbers that go with
certain things, so I know what the combination is, how many digits as
they vary, and what order and what punctuation.

I never write down my passwords, but I do know where to find my hints
as I have various passwords at a ton of websites. I would never be
able to remember which password goes with which website without my set
of hints. I can't even remember my usernames sometimes, and I only use
a few of those. I was just at my employer's website to review a
paycheck stub. It took me 15 minutes to remember that my username for
that account is my checker number, not a word.


  #4  
Old June 25th 11, 04:15 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
nik Simpson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 230
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair


There's a dangerous assumption here, i.e. that choosing a relatively
simple password that is highly personal to you, is safe because nobody
would guess it unless they knew you and your personal information.
Folks, that's not how hackers break passwords, they don't go your login
and try to guess your password. They hack the website completely (a-la
Sony) grab the master password file & username list, and feed that data
to one or more computers to simply brute force decrypt the password
file, they don't need to know anything about you at all.

I've decided to use Lastpass and different long completely random
passwords for each website that I couldn't begin to remember. The only
password I have to remember is my Lastpass password, they handle the
rest. Granted, this relies on two things:

1. Nobody can guess my Lastpass password
2. Lastpass's security and encryption is good enough to prevent the
master password data falling into the wrong hands and being decrytped in
a useful amount of time.

So far it's working, but if you bank online or use credit cards online,
the watchword is vigilance ;-)

BTW, are you wondering if one of the recent hacks (Sony, Citicard, etc)
has compromised your password or email address? If not, you probably
should be, so check out this tool:

https://shouldichangemypassword.com/

It's legit and simply searches the data that has been leaked from sites
like Sony to see if your email address is in leaked data.
--
Nik Simpson
  #5  
Old June 25th 11, 11:04 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
Bill Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,065
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

nik Simpson wrote:
There's a dangerous assumption here, i.e. that choosing a relatively
simple password that is highly personal to you, is safe because nobody
would guess it unless they knew you and your personal information.
Folks, that's not how hackers break passwords, they don't go your
login and try to guess your password. They hack the website
completely (a-la Sony) grab the master password file & username list,
and feed that data to one or more computers to simply brute force
decrypt the password file, they don't need to know anything about you
at all.
I've decided to use Lastpass and different long completely random
passwords for each website that I couldn't begin to remember. The only
password I have to remember is my Lastpass password, they handle the
rest. Granted, this relies on two things:

1. Nobody can guess my Lastpass password
2. Lastpass's security and encryption is good enough to prevent the
master password data falling into the wrong hands and being decrytped
in a useful amount of time.

So far it's working, but if you bank online or use credit cards
online, the watchword is vigilance ;-)

BTW, are you wondering if one of the recent hacks (Sony, Citicard,
etc) has compromised your password or email address? If not, you
probably should be, so check out this tool:

https://shouldichangemypassword.com/

It's legit and simply searches the data that has been leaked from
sites like Sony to see if your email address is in leaked data.


But how can you be sure some Lastpass employee doesn't sell a bunch of
passwords to someone else for progit? In the same way, I won't know if some
crooked store employee or waiter doesn't swell my credit card information to
someone else. In a word, its impossible to completely protect yourself from
criminals.

  #6  
Old June 25th 11, 11:48 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
Bill Graham
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,065
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

wrote:
On Jun 24, 6:39 pm, "Bill Graham" wrote:
wrote:
On Jun 19, 12:55 pm, "CatNipped" wrote:
I hate, hate HATE those companies that not only require a certain
number of characters, but refuse passwords that are recent repeats
of past passwords (like 20 passwords back, or won't allow
consesequitive letters, or common words, or anything at ALL easily
memorable - no wonder I can't ever get into the same place twice.
What the heck do they care if I get "hacked", that's *NY* problem,
and besides, the passwords I use and remember couldn't possibly be
figured out by anyone but me and *maybe* Ben. Who the hell are they
to tell me what's a proper password for me??!!


/password rant


I come up with passwords that mean something to me, but are not
normal names by themselves. And then I send myself an email with my
username and password hint. The hint makes perfect sense to me, so
I don't have to include the actual password. It could be a letter
and the # sign, and I know what name and number that is. It could
be old goal or new goal, and I know what that means.


At work, I keep it very simple as 3 of use the same account, and I
really doubt somebody wants to hack into the deli department
account. So I have an easy word, punctuation, and a number, and the
number goes up by a specific number every time it requires a
password change. That way, the other clerks can easily guess the
new password if they find it has changed.


I also like to answer security questions wrong, so that I know the
correct answer, but it isn't easily obvious. For example, I don't
use my sister's middle name for that question. I use somebody else;s
middle name. I don't use my first pet, etc.


Yes. Well, passwords vary in their importance. You can use simple
ones for unimportant things, but for the important stuff, it's good
to have a password that's difficult to figure out. and, it these
important ones that I would like to encode so that I can figure them
out on the spot based on the information I have rather than sheer
memory, but nobody else could. - It would be completely raqndom to
anyone who doesn't know my "system", and that way, I wouldn't have
to write anything down. My problem with writing stuff down is
twqfold, I would misplace the book and not be able to enter my own
accounts, and/or someone else would break into my house when I am
gone asnd get all my passwords out of the book. In either case, I
don't like the idea of writing therm down in a book.


This is why I send myself an email and save it in a special location.
And the email contains the username and a hint. No actual password.
And I know what the hint means. I have made up numbers that go with
certain things, so I know what the combination is, how many digits as
they vary, and what order and what punctuation.

I never write down my passwords, but I do know where to find my hints
as I have various passwords at a ton of websites. I would never be
able to remember which password goes with which website without my set
of hints. I can't even remember my usernames sometimes, and I only use
a few of those. I was just at my employer's website to review a
paycheck stub. It took me 15 minutes to remember that my username for
that account is my checker number, not a word.


That would kill it for me.... I am incapable of thinking about anything for
15 minutes....:^)

  #7  
Old June 26th 11, 07:45 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,349
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

wrote:

This is why I send myself an email and save it in a special location.
And the email contains the username and a hint. No actual password.
And I know what the hint means. I have made up numbers that go with
certain things, so I know what the combination is, how many digits as
they vary, and what order and what punctuation.


I never write down my passwords, but I do know where to find my hints
as I have various passwords at a ton of websites. I would never be
able to remember which password goes with which website without my set
of hints. I can't even remember my usernames sometimes, and I only use
a few of those. I was just at my employer's website to review a
paycheck stub. It took me 15 minutes to remember that my username for
that account is my checker number, not a word.


Do you keep all the hints + websites (or other places where you use
passwords) in one file? And then if you have to log on to a site, you
look in that file to see the hint for that site? It sounds like a good
idea.

Joyce

--
A black cat crossing your path signifies that the animal is going
somewhere. -- Groucho Marx
  #8  
Old June 30th 11, 08:48 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 185
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

On Jun 25, 11:45*pm, wrote:
wrote:

* This is why I send myself an email and save it in a special location..
* And the email contains the username and a hint. No actual password.
* And I know what the hint means. I have made up numbers that go with
* certain things, so I know what the combination is, how many digits as
* they vary, and what order and what punctuation.

* I never write down my passwords, but I do know where to find my hints
* as I have various passwords at a ton of websites. I would never be
* able to remember which password goes with which website without my set
* of hints. I can't even remember my usernames sometimes, and I only use
* a few of those. I was just at my employer's website to review a
* paycheck stub. It took me 15 minutes to remember that my username for
* that account is my checker number, not a word.

Do you keep all the hints + websites (or other places where you use
passwords) in one file? And then if you have to log on to a site, you
look in that file to see the hint for that site? It sounds like a good
idea.


Yes, I send myself an email for each hint, so I can go back and look
for the email for amazon.com or my isp provider, etc. Then open it and
see my username and hint. I have a separate folder for these emails,
so I know where they all are. And if somebody found it, they would
have my usernames, but they wouldn't know what the hints mean. How
would they know what "old goal" means? Not even my family has a clue
what my goal was or what number I associate with it. I also have a new
goal hint, and a variety of others.


  #9  
Old July 2nd 11, 12:55 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.anecdotes,rec.pets.cats.health+behav,alt.pets.cats,rec.pets.cats.rescue
jmc[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 113
Default Must Discuss the Kitties' Welfair

Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed
(6/30/2011 3:48 AM):
On Jun 25, 11:45 pm, wrote:
m wrote:

This is why I send myself an email and save it in a special location.
And the email contains the username and a hint. No actual password.
And I know what the hint means. I have made up numbers that go with
certain things, so I know what the combination is, how many digits as
they vary, and what order and what punctuation.


I never write down my passwords, but I do know where to find my hints
as I have various passwords at a ton of websites. I would never be
able to remember which password goes with which website without my set
of hints. I can't even remember my usernames sometimes, and I only use
a few of those. I was just at my employer's website to review a
paycheck stub. It took me 15 minutes to remember that my username for
that account is my checker number, not a word.


Do you keep all the hints + websites (or other places where you use
passwords) in one file? And then if you have to log on to a site, you
look in that file to see the hint for that site? It sounds like a good
idea.


Yes, I send myself an email for each hint, so I can go back and look
for the email for amazon.com or my isp provider, etc. Then open it and
see my username and hint. I have a separate folder for these emails,
so I know where they all are. And if somebody found it, they would
have my usernames, but they wouldn't know what the hints mean. How
would they know what "old goal" means? Not even my family has a clue
what my goal was or what number I associate with it. I also have a new
goal hint, and a variety of others.



There are apps that will do this kind of thing for you. I use Password
Safe, which is free and pretty easy to use.

jmc
 




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