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Arrgh! OT



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 10th 03, 07:44 PM
Hazel Az
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Default Arrgh! OT

What Helen said. I too have had to take my child to work and have had many
compliments on his behavior.

Hazel Az

"wafflyDIRTYcatLITTERhcsBOX" wrote in message
...
Assuming its a once-off, one could argue that it was some sort of

emergency
with day care, the baby sitters, the school, the other parent, or whoever
takes care of the little ones while that parent is at work.


Having worked in family friendly workplace some time ago (now it's very

family
friendly, I work from home!!), and having taken Nathan into the office -

there
was no-way, no-how I would have left him "in the care of" my co-workers

who had
their own jobs to get on with. Nathan understood the rules - it was work.

No
touching of anything electrical, no touching of computers, phones, etc.,

etc..
No disturbing anyone at work. He took in books and "quiet toys" so he had
plenty to keep him occupied. If I'd ever had any complaints about Nathan's
behaviour, 1. I'd have been mortified that *I'd* let my co-workers down

and 2.
I'd have made sure Nathan knew what had been unacceptable and 3. Both he &

I
would have apologised to those concerned.

As a result of his early exposure to the world of work, I now have a

teenager
who will answer the phone at home office *impeccably* and will make

tea/coffee
for clients/business reps who come to our office, and for a fourteen

year-old,
he has a mature attitide in many ways and who can interact with adults

very
well. He isn't perfect, but for a teenager, he's remarkably human ;-) The
occasional taking him to the workplace has benefits to him, and to a

workplace
too, I think, as it shows workers without kids that life with kids can be
pretty demanding, and when the child is well-behaved, it shows not all
offsprinbg are Little Horrors [TM] ;-)

BUT, ground rules on behaviour of kids in the workplace are *essential*

Cheers, helen s


~~~~~~~~~~
This is sent from a redundant email
Mail sent to it is dumped
My correct one can be gleaned from
h$**$*$el$**e$n$**$d$**$o$*$t**$$s$**$im$mo$ns*@a$ **o$l.c$$*o$*m*$
by getting rid of the overdependence on money and fame
~~~~~~~~~~



  #2  
Old August 10th 03, 09:02 PM
GraceCat
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Default

Julie Cook wrote in message ...
VentWill somebody please tell my why it is considered acceptable to
bring young children to the office and leave them alone in your office
while you go off to the lab to work?Vent Off

Sorry, I think I've reached the frustration point and it is only 11:30 a.m.

Julie



Youngest I'd leave a child in my office during working hours and I was
outside of said office would be 12 and that's only! because a good
friend of mine has a churchmouse quiet 12 year old. Otherwise, as
soon as they could sit still and shut up for more than a couple hours
(14ish? maybe?). Also only if they could behave. I remember running
around town in highschool, (by myself in my car, driving age) and
visiting Dad in his office from time to time. It was a cool hang-out
spot for a few minutes but normally he was too busy to visit and I'd
bail. So I guess, ideally if they're old enough to stay home by
themselves, it's possible they're well behaved enough to visit the
workplace.

Anything else is unfair and disrespectful to fellow coworkers.

Grace
  #3  
Old August 11th 03, 04:42 AM
LOL
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Default

(GraceCat) wrote in message . com...
Julie Cook wrote in message ...
VentWill somebody please tell my why it is considered acceptable to
bring young children to the office and leave them alone in your office
while you go off to the lab to work?Vent Off

Sorry, I think I've reached the frustration point and it is only 11:30 a.m.

Julie



Youngest I'd leave a child in my office during working hours and I was
outside of said office would be 12 and that's only! because a good
friend of mine has a churchmouse quiet 12 year old. Otherwise, as
soon as they could sit still and shut up for more than a couple hours
(14ish? maybe?). Also only if they could behave. I remember running
around town in highschool, (by myself in my car, driving age) and
visiting Dad in his office from time to time. It was a cool hang-out
spot for a few minutes but normally he was too busy to visit and I'd
bail. So I guess, ideally if they're old enough to stay home by
themselves, it's possible they're well behaved enough to visit the
workplace.

Anything else is unfair and disrespectful to fellow coworkers.

Grace




Ummmm, when I was 12, I was *working* in my dad's office every day
after school. I answered the phone, did the filing, etc.

IMO, it's the under-five set that wreaks havoc in an office; I hate it
when a client brings in kids and leaves them in the lobby. We don't
watch them, and if that's what the parents are expecting they are out
of luck, but we do have to deal with their noise. Grrrrr.

------
Krista
 




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