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Hill's T/D carbs?



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 1st 03, 09:35 PM
Janet Peerson
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Posts: n/a
Default Hill's T/D carbs?

In article ,
Steve Crane wrote:


3. Carbohydrates have nothing what so ever to do with diabetes or
renal failure.
[snip]
4. The most tested and clinically proven method of managing diabetes
is a high fiber diet. The new low carb philosophy has minimal testing
and one of those tests was badly flawed. I think it may be true that a
small subset of diabetic cats may do better on a low carb, high
protein, high fat food, than on the clinically proven high fiber
diets. At this point we have no way to determine which is the best
path for any given individual. Under those circumstances I prefer to
err ont he side of clinically proven technology and science.


Steve, I have heard a rumor that Hill's has come out with a new diet called "m/d" for
diabetic cats. Unfortunately, there's no information on the Hill's web site about this.
Does it exist, and do you know anything about its nutritional content?

On the issue of carbohydrate content and health: what we really need is a long-term (years)
randomized trial of diabetic cats who are randomly assigned to the high-carbohydrate-high-fiber diet
which you recommend, or a low-carbohydrate diet such as Purina DM. Outcome variables would
not only be the usual glucose and insulin variables, but also rates of developing other
diseases or conditions (CRF, cancer, hyperthyroid, DKA), and post-diagnosis life span.
Hill's is well-poised to fund such a study.

-- Janet
  #2  
Old July 1st 03, 09:35 PM
Janet Peerson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Steve Crane wrote:


3. Carbohydrates have nothing what so ever to do with diabetes or
renal failure.
[snip]
4. The most tested and clinically proven method of managing diabetes
is a high fiber diet. The new low carb philosophy has minimal testing
and one of those tests was badly flawed. I think it may be true that a
small subset of diabetic cats may do better on a low carb, high
protein, high fat food, than on the clinically proven high fiber
diets. At this point we have no way to determine which is the best
path for any given individual. Under those circumstances I prefer to
err ont he side of clinically proven technology and science.


Steve, I have heard a rumor that Hill's has come out with a new diet called "m/d" for
diabetic cats. Unfortunately, there's no information on the Hill's web site about this.
Does it exist, and do you know anything about its nutritional content?

On the issue of carbohydrate content and health: what we really need is a long-term (years)
randomized trial of diabetic cats who are randomly assigned to the high-carbohydrate-high-fiber diet
which you recommend, or a low-carbohydrate diet such as Purina DM. Outcome variables would
not only be the usual glucose and insulin variables, but also rates of developing other
diseases or conditions (CRF, cancer, hyperthyroid, DKA), and post-diagnosis life span.
Hill's is well-poised to fund such a study.

-- Janet
 




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Hill's T/D carbs - Thanks, Steve and Liz for the interestingdiscussion Jean Cat health & behaviour 17 July 8th 03 03:12 PM


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