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Lethal dose of morphine for a cat



 
 
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  #71  
Old October 2nd 04, 06:44 AM
jamie
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Mary wrote:

wrote:
"Mary" wrote:

While my cat did not like getting the shots, afterward she really did

seem
to just fall asleep.


I wonder if there is a dulled sense of panic between the heart stopping
and the final cessation of brain activity. It must be similar to a heart
attack.


I am curious--and of course if this is too personal I apologize and
retract--have you had a heart attack? I never have, and I wonder what it is
like.


One or both of you have "heart attack" (an uncomfortable to very
painful event, usually due to blockages in blood vessels to the heart,
and causing damage to the heart), confused with "cardiac arrest"
(heart stopping).

When not enough blood/oxygen is being pumped to the brain, one of
the first things that happens is loss of consciousness. (This is
why some people faint when they stand up quickly and blood pressure
doesn't correct quickly enough. Consciousness is shut-off, because
it's easier to get blood to the head when you're lying on the floor.)

It is my understanding that animals are typically given a sedative
and/or painkillers before the drug that stops their heart, so I frankly
doubt there is any sense of panic, dulled or otherwise, except for the
actual insertion of the needle. And since one typically euthanizes
an animal *because* it is in significant discomfort, I suspect the
last thing experienced by the animal is a sense of relief from that
discomfort.








--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."

  #72  
Old October 2nd 04, 06:44 AM
jamie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Mary wrote:

wrote:
"Mary" wrote:

While my cat did not like getting the shots, afterward she really did

seem
to just fall asleep.


I wonder if there is a dulled sense of panic between the heart stopping
and the final cessation of brain activity. It must be similar to a heart
attack.


I am curious--and of course if this is too personal I apologize and
retract--have you had a heart attack? I never have, and I wonder what it is
like.


One or both of you have "heart attack" (an uncomfortable to very
painful event, usually due to blockages in blood vessels to the heart,
and causing damage to the heart), confused with "cardiac arrest"
(heart stopping).

When not enough blood/oxygen is being pumped to the brain, one of
the first things that happens is loss of consciousness. (This is
why some people faint when they stand up quickly and blood pressure
doesn't correct quickly enough. Consciousness is shut-off, because
it's easier to get blood to the head when you're lying on the floor.)

It is my understanding that animals are typically given a sedative
and/or painkillers before the drug that stops their heart, so I frankly
doubt there is any sense of panic, dulled or otherwise, except for the
actual insertion of the needle. And since one typically euthanizes
an animal *because* it is in significant discomfort, I suspect the
last thing experienced by the animal is a sense of relief from that
discomfort.








--
jamie )

"There's a seeker born every minute."

  #73  
Old October 3rd 04, 08:58 AM
Sherry
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P.S. My motto: they can have my cheese when they pry it from my cold dead
hands--so--I imagine I might be looking at some trouble one day.


Yeah, cardiologists pretty much think cheese is The Devil. I have no problem
living without red meat. It's the cheese, butter, and ice cream. Wah.

Sherry

My athletic friends have all gotten sports injuries and by the time they get
osteo arthritis from using their joints too much I figure I will be going in
for bypass.










  #74  
Old October 3rd 04, 08:58 AM
Sherry
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Posts: n/a
Default

P.S. My motto: they can have my cheese when they pry it from my cold dead
hands--so--I imagine I might be looking at some trouble one day.


Yeah, cardiologists pretty much think cheese is The Devil. I have no problem
living without red meat. It's the cheese, butter, and ice cream. Wah.

Sherry

My athletic friends have all gotten sports injuries and by the time they get
osteo arthritis from using their joints too much I figure I will be going in
for bypass.










  #77  
Old October 4th 04, 02:47 PM
drew
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(Luramao) wrote in message ...

I had a cat whom I took to the vet last year thinking it might be for
euthanasia; he was very old and had been very sick for a very long time,
and seemed to be nearing the end. However, on the way to the vet,
somehow he KNEW, and he began looking me at imploringly, pleadingly, and
I couldnt do it. He ended up living another 4 weeks, mostly spent
peacefully sleeping; he didnt seem to be suffering or in pain, and in
the end, he just went to sleep one night and didnt wake up. I was very
glad I left it up to him as to when to go......


Yeah, my cat would know too. Fortunately, I think she'll live a while
yet.

I would prefer for her to guide me, but, if I have to make the decision,
if she is suffering or in pain, if she has to be put down, I'm thinking
I want it to be done with a captive bolt pistol. I believe, and I have
also heard a vet say, that this is the quickest, least traumatic way of
doing it. It is instantaneous and the animal doesnt see it coming.
I've heard that it can be difficult to find a "pet" vet who has a
captive bolt pistol tho. Has anybody ever had a pet put down this way?


I'd have a hard time doing it but if it's as fast and instantaneous as
you say, then I would. My old cat deserves the very fastest way out
and I want her to have no idea when it's coming. Wish somebody would
do it to me in my sleep when I'm ready to go. I can see it with
livestock but with a little cat, wouldn't a big old bolt practically
blow the little chap's head off? I don't mean to be crude but I would
imagine for a small animal it would have to be a different guage than
something used for a cow or a sheep.
  #78  
Old October 4th 04, 02:47 PM
drew
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

(Luramao) wrote in message ...

I had a cat whom I took to the vet last year thinking it might be for
euthanasia; he was very old and had been very sick for a very long time,
and seemed to be nearing the end. However, on the way to the vet,
somehow he KNEW, and he began looking me at imploringly, pleadingly, and
I couldnt do it. He ended up living another 4 weeks, mostly spent
peacefully sleeping; he didnt seem to be suffering or in pain, and in
the end, he just went to sleep one night and didnt wake up. I was very
glad I left it up to him as to when to go......


Yeah, my cat would know too. Fortunately, I think she'll live a while
yet.

I would prefer for her to guide me, but, if I have to make the decision,
if she is suffering or in pain, if she has to be put down, I'm thinking
I want it to be done with a captive bolt pistol. I believe, and I have
also heard a vet say, that this is the quickest, least traumatic way of
doing it. It is instantaneous and the animal doesnt see it coming.
I've heard that it can be difficult to find a "pet" vet who has a
captive bolt pistol tho. Has anybody ever had a pet put down this way?


I'd have a hard time doing it but if it's as fast and instantaneous as
you say, then I would. My old cat deserves the very fastest way out
and I want her to have no idea when it's coming. Wish somebody would
do it to me in my sleep when I'm ready to go. I can see it with
livestock but with a little cat, wouldn't a big old bolt practically
blow the little chap's head off? I don't mean to be crude but I would
imagine for a small animal it would have to be a different guage than
something used for a cow or a sheep.
 




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