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  #241  
Old August 26th 04, 05:03 AM
Sherry
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I had a heart attack in 1999. When I subsequently got my medical
records from the hospital, I discovered that one of the doctors had
been concerned by my "flat affect" -- in other words, he felt that I
was too calm, not worried enough. Once I had made it to the
hospital, I figured that I was in good hands, and went back to my
usual analytical personality, asking the doctors questions about my
condition and treatment. On another hospital visit, one of the
doctors asked me if I was an engineer. When I told him that I was a
computer programmer, he said that he had figured it was something
like that. Such people, who methodically analyze problems at work,
tend to do the same thing when faced with medical issues.


That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh, Sherlock.

Sherry
  #242  
Old August 26th 04, 01:53 PM
Adrian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

{{{{{{{{Cheryl}}}}}}}}}

Sometime I think I'll never come to terms with the loss of my little
brother. So much of what you wrote about your son applies to him too. It
does help to have a purring cat snuggled against, but *nothing* can ever
come close to what we've lost.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy & Bagheera)
A house is not a home, without a cat.


  #243  
Old August 26th 04, 01:53 PM
Adrian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

{{{{{{{{Cheryl}}}}}}}}}

Sometime I think I'll never come to terms with the loss of my little
brother. So much of what you wrote about your son applies to him too. It
does help to have a purring cat snuggled against, but *nothing* can ever
come close to what we've lost.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy & Bagheera)
A house is not a home, without a cat.


  #244  
Old August 26th 04, 01:53 PM
Adrian
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

{{{{{{{{Cheryl}}}}}}}}}

Sometime I think I'll never come to terms with the loss of my little
brother. So much of what you wrote about your son applies to him too. It
does help to have a purring cat snuggled against, but *nothing* can ever
come close to what we've lost.
--
Adrian (Owned by Snoopy & Bagheera)
A house is not a home, without a cat.


  #245  
Old August 26th 04, 07:47 PM
Tanada
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sherry wrote:

That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh, Sherlock.

Sherry


Conversational gambit? Honestly, the best ones seem to be lacking in
people skills, and that may have been his way of trying to get you to
talk about it. The surgeon I had for my gall bladder removal
(gallbladderectomy?) didn't warn me about post surgery depression. He
had his PA do it.

"Post surgery depression is quite common, no matter how needed the
procedure, and how un-needed the body part is. The person has had their
life changed by that surgery and they will never be the same as they
were before. The patient may feel violated because the surgeon had
their hands in his/her body. They may feel as though maybe the surgery
wasn't necessary after all and might have gotten better without the
procedure. They might also feel as though they are "less" because of
the surgery, because now something is missing or different. They may
also feel as though they are looking on their own obituaries because it
was a life threatening problem. Whatever the cause for the depression,
it is not uncommon and the patient needs to talk about it." Paraphrased
from my surgeon's PA.

I had fun with him after this and told him I was depressed because I
didn't get a chance to help with the surgery and felt as though I were
redundant and just an observer. He actually thought I was serious and
tried to explain that I was a very necessary part of the surgery, but
the Warrant Officer (nurse) laughing behind him gave me away. The PA
then told me that I didn't need his help and left the room.

Pam S.

  #246  
Old August 26th 04, 07:47 PM
Tanada
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sherry wrote:

That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh, Sherlock.

Sherry


Conversational gambit? Honestly, the best ones seem to be lacking in
people skills, and that may have been his way of trying to get you to
talk about it. The surgeon I had for my gall bladder removal
(gallbladderectomy?) didn't warn me about post surgery depression. He
had his PA do it.

"Post surgery depression is quite common, no matter how needed the
procedure, and how un-needed the body part is. The person has had their
life changed by that surgery and they will never be the same as they
were before. The patient may feel violated because the surgeon had
their hands in his/her body. They may feel as though maybe the surgery
wasn't necessary after all and might have gotten better without the
procedure. They might also feel as though they are "less" because of
the surgery, because now something is missing or different. They may
also feel as though they are looking on their own obituaries because it
was a life threatening problem. Whatever the cause for the depression,
it is not uncommon and the patient needs to talk about it." Paraphrased
from my surgeon's PA.

I had fun with him after this and told him I was depressed because I
didn't get a chance to help with the surgery and felt as though I were
redundant and just an observer. He actually thought I was serious and
tried to explain that I was a very necessary part of the surgery, but
the Warrant Officer (nurse) laughing behind him gave me away. The PA
then told me that I didn't need his help and left the room.

Pam S.

  #247  
Old August 26th 04, 07:47 PM
Tanada
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sherry wrote:

That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh, Sherlock.

Sherry


Conversational gambit? Honestly, the best ones seem to be lacking in
people skills, and that may have been his way of trying to get you to
talk about it. The surgeon I had for my gall bladder removal
(gallbladderectomy?) didn't warn me about post surgery depression. He
had his PA do it.

"Post surgery depression is quite common, no matter how needed the
procedure, and how un-needed the body part is. The person has had their
life changed by that surgery and they will never be the same as they
were before. The patient may feel violated because the surgeon had
their hands in his/her body. They may feel as though maybe the surgery
wasn't necessary after all and might have gotten better without the
procedure. They might also feel as though they are "less" because of
the surgery, because now something is missing or different. They may
also feel as though they are looking on their own obituaries because it
was a life threatening problem. Whatever the cause for the depression,
it is not uncommon and the patient needs to talk about it." Paraphrased
from my surgeon's PA.

I had fun with him after this and told him I was depressed because I
didn't get a chance to help with the surgery and felt as though I were
redundant and just an observer. He actually thought I was serious and
tried to explain that I was a very necessary part of the surgery, but
the Warrant Officer (nurse) laughing behind him gave me away. The PA
then told me that I didn't need his help and left the room.

Pam S.

  #248  
Old August 28th 04, 08:07 AM
Howard Berkowitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net,
Tanada wrote:

Sherry wrote:

That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything
except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or
something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The
arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to
tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure
something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a
carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day
the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh,
Sherlock.

Sherry


Conversational gambit? Honestly, the best ones seem to be lacking in
people skills, and that may have been his way of trying to get you to
talk about it.


LOL...I remember one day, after my coronary artery bypass, when my
surgeon came in with his flock of residents, fellows and students, and
sat down on the edge of the bed and started to chat.

"Are you SURE you're board-certified"?

He was shocked. "What? Why?"

"Does the American College of Surgeons know that you make all the time
needed for patients, are friendly to students, treat residents like
peers, and the nurses all love you? Terrible example...."

A lot of specialists behave like their stereotypes, but there can be
exceptions. It's unusual that I have problems with a cardiologist, but
then, I speak cardiology better than most dialects of doctor.

The surgeon I had for my gall bladder removal
(gallbladderectomy?) didn't warn me about post surgery depression. He
had his PA do it.

"Post surgery depression is quite common, no matter how needed the
procedure, and how un-needed the body part is. The person has had their
life changed by that surgery and they will never be the same as they
were before. The patient may feel violated because the surgeon had
their hands in his/her body. They may feel as though maybe the surgery
wasn't necessary after all and might have gotten better without the
procedure. They might also feel as though they are "less" because of
the surgery, because now something is missing or different. They may
also feel as though they are looking on their own obituaries because it
was a life threatening problem. Whatever the cause for the depression,
it is not uncommon and the patient needs to talk about it." Paraphrased
from my surgeon's PA.

I had fun with him after this and told him I was depressed because I
didn't get a chance to help with the surgery and felt as though I were
redundant and just an observer. He actually thought I was serious and
tried to explain that I was a very necessary part of the surgery, but
the Warrant Officer (nurse) laughing behind him gave me away. The PA
then told me that I didn't need his help and left the room.


One finds fun where one can. When I had nerve surgery on my wrist, I
knew the hand surgeon very well. He was doing it as a teaching procedure
anyway, and was comfortable enough with me not getting panicky to
include me in the discussion (I just had a regional block) and
occasionally giving me a look inside my arm.

It was more artistic, however, to collaborate with an invasive
cardiology fellow at NIH, such that we mapped the inside of my heart
with the theme of the Monty Python Norwegian Blue Parrot skit. Had half
the team in hysterics and the other half utterly baffled. In general, it
was a multicultural event, because one of the baffled one was the senior
attending. He's Iranian-American, but most of us had to argue to find
something as background music other than his favorite cowboy songs.
  #249  
Old August 28th 04, 08:07 AM
Howard Berkowitz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article . net,
Tanada wrote:

Sherry wrote:

That's interesting. I found cardiologists to be clueless about anything
except
cardiology. I went to the ER for jaw pain. I thought I had TMJ or
something.
They decided because of an irregular EKG to run a heart cath. The
arteries in
my heart were blocked so badly they didn't even bother waking me up to
tell me
they were going to do a quadruple bypass. So I wake up and figure
something
went terribly wrong. Long story short, I ended up with 11 incisions, a
carotid
bypass, femoral bypass besides the heart bypasses. About the third day
the
vascular surgeon walked in and said, "You seem depressed." Well, duh,
Sherlock.

Sherry


Conversational gambit? Honestly, the best ones seem to be lacking in
people skills, and that may have been his way of trying to get you to
talk about it.


LOL...I remember one day, after my coronary artery bypass, when my
surgeon came in with his flock of residents, fellows and students, and
sat down on the edge of the bed and started to chat.

"Are you SURE you're board-certified"?

He was shocked. "What? Why?"

"Does the American College of Surgeons know that you make all the time
needed for patients, are friendly to students, treat residents like
peers, and the nurses all love you? Terrible example...."

A lot of specialists behave like their stereotypes, but there can be
exceptions. It's unusual that I have problems with a cardiologist, but
then, I speak cardiology better than most dialects of doctor.

The surgeon I had for my gall bladder removal
(gallbladderectomy?) didn't warn me about post surgery depression. He
had his PA do it.

"Post surgery depression is quite common, no matter how needed the
procedure, and how un-needed the body part is. The person has had their
life changed by that surgery and they will never be the same as they
were before. The patient may feel violated because the surgeon had
their hands in his/her body. They may feel as though maybe the surgery
wasn't necessary after all and might have gotten better without the
procedure. They might also feel as though they are "less" because of
the surgery, because now something is missing or different. They may
also feel as though they are looking on their own obituaries because it
was a life threatening problem. Whatever the cause for the depression,
it is not uncommon and the patient needs to talk about it." Paraphrased
from my surgeon's PA.

I had fun with him after this and told him I was depressed because I
didn't get a chance to help with the surgery and felt as though I were
redundant and just an observer. He actually thought I was serious and
tried to explain that I was a very necessary part of the surgery, but
the Warrant Officer (nurse) laughing behind him gave me away. The PA
then told me that I didn't need his help and left the room.


One finds fun where one can. When I had nerve surgery on my wrist, I
knew the hand surgeon very well. He was doing it as a teaching procedure
anyway, and was comfortable enough with me not getting panicky to
include me in the discussion (I just had a regional block) and
occasionally giving me a look inside my arm.

It was more artistic, however, to collaborate with an invasive
cardiology fellow at NIH, such that we mapped the inside of my heart
with the theme of the Monty Python Norwegian Blue Parrot skit. Had half
the team in hysterics and the other half utterly baffled. In general, it
was a multicultural event, because one of the baffled one was the senior
attending. He's Iranian-American, but most of us had to argue to find
something as background music other than his favorite cowboy songs.
 




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