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Feline Breast Cancer (Post-surgery)



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 7th 15, 10:22 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default In or Out


"Mark Carroll" wrote in message
...
Mack A. Damia writes:

I think I was beaten down a year or so ago when I said that it was
cruel to let your cat roam outside.


It's definitely one of those questions for which there is a massive
cultural difference between countries. For instance, for the UK,
http://www.yourcat.co.uk/General-cat...door-cats.html
has, "In the USA, most cat welfare people recommend an indoor-only life,
while in the UK many would recommend cats have access to the outdoors."
http://www.cats.org.uk/uploads/docum...tdoor_cats.pdf
says, "Ideally all cats would be allowed access to outdoors to express
their natural behaviour."

Now here is a letter, and an answer from a vet:


I'm guessing an American one?

Statistics vary, but house cats live, on average, nine years longer
than their outdoor counterparts.


Individual circumstances vary greatly though. For instance, do you live
right next to fast roads, or out on a rural farm? Secondly, there's
quality of life: even given a shorter lifespan, are those years much
happier for a cat that may explore and hunt as it pleases?

I don't know if you thought that one American vet's opinion is somehow
going to definitively end the debate, but their analysis seems so
simplistic, and expert advice is so diverse, that I suspect you're just
opening it up again.

-- Mark


Let's just say that my cat was in/out in UK and lived to be 25 and accept
that it's different in the USA. I refuse to argue about it.


  #12  
Old July 9th 15, 10:45 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default In or Out


"Mark Carroll" wrote in message
...
Mack A. Damia writes:

I think I was beaten down a year or so ago when I said that it was
cruel to let your cat roam outside.


It's definitely one of those questions for which there is a massive
cultural difference between countries. For instance, for the UK,
http://www.yourcat.co.uk/General-cat...door-cats.html
has, "In the USA, most cat welfare people recommend an indoor-only life,
while in the UK many would recommend cats have access to the outdoors."
http://www.cats.org.uk/uploads/docum...tdoor_cats.pdf
says, "Ideally all cats would be allowed access to outdoors to express
their natural behaviour."

Now here is a letter, and an answer from a vet:


I'm guessing an American one?

Statistics vary, but house cats live, on average, nine years longer
than their outdoor counterparts.


Individual circumstances vary greatly though. For instance, do you live
right next to fast roads, or out on a rural farm? Secondly, there's
quality of life: even given a shorter lifespan, are those years much
happier for a cat that may explore and hunt as it pleases?

I don't know if you thought that one American vet's opinion is somehow
going to definitively end the debate, but their analysis seems so
simplistic, and expert advice is so diverse, that I suspect you're just
opening it up again.

-- Mark


I will not argue about it.


  #13  
Old July 9th 15, 10:57 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Mack A. Damia
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 212
Default In or Out

On Thu, 9 Jul 2015 22:45:20 +0100, "Christina Websell"
wrote:


"Mark Carroll" wrote in message
...
Mack A. Damia writes:

I think I was beaten down a year or so ago when I said that it was
cruel to let your cat roam outside.


It's definitely one of those questions for which there is a massive
cultural difference between countries. For instance, for the UK,
http://www.yourcat.co.uk/General-cat...door-cats.html
has, "In the USA, most cat welfare people recommend an indoor-only life,
while in the UK many would recommend cats have access to the outdoors."
http://www.cats.org.uk/uploads/docum...tdoor_cats.pdf
says, "Ideally all cats would be allowed access to outdoors to express
their natural behaviour."

Now here is a letter, and an answer from a vet:


I'm guessing an American one?

Statistics vary, but house cats live, on average, nine years longer
than their outdoor counterparts.


Individual circumstances vary greatly though. For instance, do you live
right next to fast roads, or out on a rural farm? Secondly, there's
quality of life: even given a shorter lifespan, are those years much
happier for a cat that may explore and hunt as it pleases?

I don't know if you thought that one American vet's opinion is somehow
going to definitively end the debate, but their analysis seems so
simplistic, and expert advice is so diverse, that I suspect you're just
opening it up again.

-- Mark


I will not argue about it.


You lack the intellectual capability to argue about it. The lights
are on, but there's nobody home.

--

  #14  
Old July 29th 15, 09:37 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default In or Out


"Mark Carroll" wrote in message
...
Mack A. Damia writes:

I think I was beaten down a year or so ago when I said that it was
cruel to let your cat roam outside.


It's definitely one of those questions for which there is a massive
cultural difference between countries. For instance, for the UK,
http://www.yourcat.co.uk/General-cat...door-cats.html
has, "In the USA, most cat welfare people recommend an indoor-only life,
while in the UK many would recommend cats have access to the outdoors."
http://www.cats.org.uk/uploads/docum...tdoor_cats.pdf
says, "Ideally all cats would be allowed access to outdoors to express
their natural behaviour."

Now here is a letter, and an answer from a vet:


I'm guessing an American one?

Statistics vary, but house cats live, on average, nine years longer
than their outdoor counterparts.


Individual circumstances vary greatly though. For instance, do you live
right next to fast roads, or out on a rural farm? Secondly, there's
quality of life: even given a shorter lifespan, are those years much
happier for a cat that may explore and hunt as it pleases?

I don't know if you thought that one American vet's opinion is somehow
going to definitively end the debate, but their analysis seems so
simplistic, and expert advice is so diverse, that I suspect you're just
opening it up again.

--

so let's not.




  #15  
Old November 2nd 15, 07:45 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
gamincat[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5
Default Feline Breast Cancer (Post-surgery)

On Tuesday, October 1, 2013 at 4:50:45 PM UTC-5, Karece Lopez wrote:
Does anyone have experience with low white blood cell counts and chemotherapy?
Did WBC fall then rise?
Do you think chemotherapy was worth it (health and happiness of the cat, financial and emotional for you)?

So, our 5 year old spayed female has breast cancer. In July she had a radical mastectomy to remove the right mammary chain. Four weeks ago she had her first chemotherapy injection.
Initially we were going to do a treatment every two-three weeks with blood work in between the early treatments to check for side effects. The problem is that her white blood cell count remains too low for further chemotherapy after four weeks. The oncologist says this is unusual but I should bring her back next week for blood work again. When I started I felt that chemo was the way to go but I don't want to drag her to the vet every week for blood work.


In my past experience with cats and cancer, you have to see how it goes with the treatments. I had two cats do very well with chemo - very little if any side effects - and their cancers were successfully put into remission. Another cat who was more elderly did not do well and I eventually stopped the treatment and put him down when it seemed like the right time. There are meds they can use to help them tolerate the chemo in some cases such as for nausea or loss of appetite.

Good luck to you and your little one.
 




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