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How do you part with kittens?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 9th 04, 04:28 AM
Aimee S
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Default How do you part with kittens?


Hi,

I have 3 soon to be 8 week old kittens, I've had them since they were 3
and a half weeks, dropper fed them worried over them and now have to
find homes for them. They are sooo sweet, but I already have to many
cat's in the house. It's breaking my heart to have to give them up, any
thought's??
I want so bad for them to have the very best homes, how can I be sure?

Thanks for any help with this,

Aimee

  #2  
Old March 9th 04, 05:33 AM
Cat Protector
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I'd ask a no-kill rescue group to help you on this one. I wouldn't give the
cats away for free to just anyone who wants them either.

--
Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of All Your Computer Needs!
www.members.cox.net/catprotector/panthertek

Cat Galaxy: All Cats, All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com
"Aimee S" wrote in message
...

Hi,

I have 3 soon to be 8 week old kittens, I've had them since they were 3
and a half weeks, dropper fed them worried over them and now have to
find homes for them. They are sooo sweet, but I already have to many
cat's in the house. It's breaking my heart to have to give them up, any
thought's??
I want so bad for them to have the very best homes, how can I be sure?

Thanks for any help with this,

Aimee



  #3  
Old March 9th 04, 01:53 PM
Wendy
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"Aimee S" wrote in message
...

Hi,

I have 3 soon to be 8 week old kittens, I've had them since they were 3
and a half weeks, dropper fed them worried over them and now have to
find homes for them. They are sooo sweet, but I already have to many
cat's in the house. It's breaking my heart to have to give them up, any
thought's??
I want so bad for them to have the very best homes, how can I be sure?

Thanks for any help with this,

Aimee


I can relate. We bottle fed 4 last fall. We adopted one of them to a friend
down the street, kept one, and the other two were adopted through a local
rescue group that works out of PetSmart. We didn't leave them at PetSmart
but took them up on Saturday when they have adoptions and let the rescue
group screen the potential adopters. They ended up being adopted together so
I felt pretty good about that.

It was hard to let any of them go.

W


  #4  
Old March 9th 04, 03:12 PM
Sunflower
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"Aimee S" wrote in message
...

Hi,

I have 3 soon to be 8 week old kittens, I've had them since they were 3
and a half weeks, dropper fed them worried over them and now have to
find homes for them. They are sooo sweet, but I already have to many
cat's in the house. It's breaking my heart to have to give them up, any
thought's??
I want so bad for them to have the very best homes, how can I be sure?

Thanks for any help with this,

Aimee


First of all, ***you do NOT *Give* them away***. Any idiot who wants a cat
for a less than honorable purpose can lie to you with the greatest of skill
about everything. Look at Bill Frist.You charge an adoption fee. 8 weeks
is old enough for any vets who do juvenile spay/neuter to go ahead and fix
them. Check with the Humane Society to see if there is someone in your area
who can do it cheaply. You want these animals fixed before they leave your
custody, *or you're just potentially adding to the overpopulation problem*.
Then, charge how much it cost you to have them fixed as the adoption fee.
I'm assuming that you've already started their shots on your own, but if you
haven't, also do that. Releasing a cat from your care without being current
on shots and being fixed isn't really "rescuing". If a potential adoptor
balks at paying these costs, you can rest assured that they would not spend
the money to have the cat fixed and to get their shots. Anyone who is
serious about adding a pet to their family will have researched the ultimate
costs and realize they're getting their money's worth. Then, you have them
fill out an application, asking them who their vet is, who their employer
is, how long they've lived at their current home, whether they rent or own,
and how many children they have and their ages. Sample adoption
applications are available from many rescue groups on the net. Be sure to
include the standard legalese fineprint release about suing you as well as
that the animal won't be used for dog fighting or research. THen, call the
vet and ask them how long X has been a client and how many animals they've
had on record there and if they've been current on their shots and spayed
and neutered. If someone lives on a busy highway and has gone through 9
cats in the last 3 years that have gotten run over, they obviously would be
a poor choice of home. But, people like that will lie straight to your face
and tell you how wonderful a home they will give the kitty and how much
they'll love it. **Love is NOT enough** You want to be sure they'll be
responsible, which is expecting a lot more and is more difficult to
quantify. Be sure and check with the landlord if the adoptor rents. You'd
be surprised at how many people *say* the landlord has no problem with them
having pets, but they haven't paid the $400 pet deposit and have no
intention of doing so. Also be very cautious of families with young
children. Young children and young pets do not mix very well at all, unless
the child has been taught respect for animals. These days when kids don't
even have respect for their parents, it's hard to find a family with small
kids who I'd trust to not kill a kitten accidentally---or on purpose, and
you don't even want to go into THAT one, which I HAVE had happen (and the
family had the balls to come back to the shelter wanting to replace the
kitten!). Interview the kids. They'll tell you *everything* that the
parents don't want you to know. (that's how we found out about the kitten
above) When you handle a thousand adoptions a year, you'll make mistakes,
but since you only have two, you can screen and screen until you find the
perfect homes.


  #5  
Old March 9th 04, 08:04 PM
Aimee S
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Just wanted to thank all of you for the response, it helped me a lot.
There is no
no-kill center around here, I live in the country. but much of what was
said is VERY helpful.!!

Thanks SO MUCH,

God Bless,

Aimee



  #6  
Old March 9th 04, 09:43 PM
Sharon Talbert
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The first time is always the hardest, Aimee. Bottom line has always been
for me, that the kitten has to be going to a home at least as good as what
I can provide.

Home visit is good, before the adoption is final. Getting the kitten
started on its distemper shots is also good, especially with hand-reared
orphans. The wonderful world of veterinary medicine now allows for
kittens to begin vaccinations as early as 4 weeks, finishing up by 12
weeks. Also fecal with worming (roundworms are pretty much guaranteed;
coccidia is not unlikely). Charge the adoptors at least what it costs
you in vet fees.

Good luck to you and your little monsters.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
www.campuscats.org



  #8  
Old March 19th 04, 02:31 PM
MaryL
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"IBen Getiner" wrote in message
om...
(Aimee S) wrote in message

...
Hi,

I have 3 soon to be 8 week old kittens, I've had them since they were 3
and a half weeks, dropper fed them worried over them and now have to
find homes for them. They are sooo sweet, but I already have to many
cat's in the house. It's breaking my heart to have to give them up, any
thought's??
I want so bad for them to have the very best homes, how can I be sure?


That's just the thing... You can't. I knew this lady up in the
country some years ago who thought she was adopting out three kittens
to a nice fellow. Come to find out, he fed them to his five foot Ball
python. By coincidence, he was the parent of my son's best friend, and
my son told me all about it. Saw the whole thing, too.
I'd be very careful if I had to part with little things that are as
sweet and fuzzy as my baby kitties. I'd have to know the people
personally.


Thanks for any help with this,

Aimee


Be careful


Unfortunately (and tragically), what you have described here really does
happen. That is one of the reasons most of us recommend that kittens should
not be given away "free." The person adopting them out should charge at
least enough to cover their vet bills and possibly some extra for food and
supplies that have been used. This isn't being greedy -- it's being done
because someone who wants the little kittens for purposes such as what you
described won't pay that amount. In addition, of course, the person doing
the adopting should pursue the same type of policy that a shelter would --
ask questions, check references, draw up a contract (it can be informal)
where the person adopting would guarantee to return the cat or kitten if
they ever giveit up, and possibly visit the home first.

MaryL


  #9  
Old March 22nd 04, 09:53 PM
Luvskats00
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Four years ago, I heard a crying outside. I looked and saw a skinny little cat
walking back & forth. I ran downstairs w/a can of food. She practically inhaled
it. No owner stepped forth and, after about 80 calls,my husband's aunt adopted
her. She was pregnant (so skinny it wasn't apparent, at first). Eight kitties
were born and were adored by the entire family. I came over all the time and
saw the kittens an hour after they were born. We got to know all eight and gave
them nicknames. Incredibly, one was the leader, two were shy beyond
belief...each had a distinct personality. Two months later, my hubby & I
adopted the leader..we named him Sammy. Three of the others were adopted by
those known to the family..remaining kitties were given to a foster family who
had an excellent track record for finding good homes for kitties. I often
wonder about those adopted who were never seen again and am comforted with the
hope that they are loved half as much as my boy, Sammy.
 




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