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Good News and Bad News (a foster update).



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 6th 03, 06:11 AM
Kalyahna
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Good News and Bad News (a foster update).

The good news: Malcolm went back to the humane society, into the multiple
cat room. He's in hog heaven. Chowing down, loving the other kitties. What's
amusing is that he's a big solid boy with huge paws and not an ounce of chub
on him but he's so easily intimidated by the black and white female in there
who's only half his size.

Last minute good news: A few of our ringworm cats have begun to come back
negative on their cultures. The pair that's been undergoing treatment since
September finally had three negatives, went to the adoptable floor, and
found a home within days. Two others are currently on the adoptable floor.
There was a pair of sleek black young adults in quarantine because they were
petrified; at one point, they were on the euthanasia list, but I begged and
pleaded. Jackson and Jillian went to foster to get over considerable URI,
and they're back and on the adoptable floor. Jill is still the shy girl, and
I've never seen a sleeker pair of kitties.

The bad news: Elmo is spraying. Marking. Four times in the last month or so.
He's a very handsome white w/ orange, a little under 7 years, front
declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination problems. He's
had a urinalysis and the vet said it seems to be stress-related, the
marking, as there's nothing in his urine to explain it. Interestingly
enough, it started after my cat went to the vet for conjunctivitis in one
eye, and after we got back, he peed on the carrier. Considering our space
situation at work, I don't know what's going to happen to him when he goes
back tomorrow. I'm hoping he'll be given a cage to see if he can find a
perfect home... but the perfect home for him is no other cats, no dogs, no
kids (he bites - not often, but when he does, it's a hard bite), someone
with behavioral experience to work on manners with him. It may be that with
his history, he just won't be deemed adoptable.

So. Here's hoping that I get back from work tomorrow with good news instead
of bad.


  #2  
Old November 8th 03, 04:56 AM
onebyone
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Feliway might be the answer;
http://www.felinecrf.com/

"Kalyahna" wrote in message
...
The good news: Malcolm went back to the humane society, into the multiple
cat room. He's in hog heaven. Chowing down, loving the other kitties.

What's
amusing is that he's a big solid boy with huge paws and not an ounce of

chub
on him but he's so easily intimidated by the black and white female in

there
who's only half his size.

Last minute good news: A few of our ringworm cats have begun to come back
negative on their cultures. The pair that's been undergoing treatment

since
September finally had three negatives, went to the adoptable floor, and
found a home within days. Two others are currently on the adoptable floor.
There was a pair of sleek black young adults in quarantine because they

were
petrified; at one point, they were on the euthanasia list, but I begged

and
pleaded. Jackson and Jillian went to foster to get over considerable URI,
and they're back and on the adoptable floor. Jill is still the shy girl,

and
I've never seen a sleeker pair of kitties.

The bad news: Elmo is spraying. Marking. Four times in the last month or

so.
He's a very handsome white w/ orange, a little under 7 years, front
declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination problems. He's
had a urinalysis and the vet said it seems to be stress-related, the
marking, as there's nothing in his urine to explain it. Interestingly
enough, it started after my cat went to the vet for conjunctivitis in one
eye, and after we got back, he peed on the carrier. Considering our space
situation at work, I don't know what's going to happen to him when he goes
back tomorrow. I'm hoping he'll be given a cage to see if he can find a
perfect home... but the perfect home for him is no other cats, no dogs, no
kids (he bites - not often, but when he does, it's a hard bite), someone
with behavioral experience to work on manners with him. It may be that

with
his history, he just won't be deemed adoptable.

So. Here's hoping that I get back from work tomorrow with good news

instead
of bad.




  #3  
Old November 8th 03, 04:56 AM
onebyone
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Feliway might be the answer;
http://www.felinecrf.com/

"Kalyahna" wrote in message
...
The good news: Malcolm went back to the humane society, into the multiple
cat room. He's in hog heaven. Chowing down, loving the other kitties.

What's
amusing is that he's a big solid boy with huge paws and not an ounce of

chub
on him but he's so easily intimidated by the black and white female in

there
who's only half his size.

Last minute good news: A few of our ringworm cats have begun to come back
negative on their cultures. The pair that's been undergoing treatment

since
September finally had three negatives, went to the adoptable floor, and
found a home within days. Two others are currently on the adoptable floor.
There was a pair of sleek black young adults in quarantine because they

were
petrified; at one point, they were on the euthanasia list, but I begged

and
pleaded. Jackson and Jillian went to foster to get over considerable URI,
and they're back and on the adoptable floor. Jill is still the shy girl,

and
I've never seen a sleeker pair of kitties.

The bad news: Elmo is spraying. Marking. Four times in the last month or

so.
He's a very handsome white w/ orange, a little under 7 years, front
declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination problems. He's
had a urinalysis and the vet said it seems to be stress-related, the
marking, as there's nothing in his urine to explain it. Interestingly
enough, it started after my cat went to the vet for conjunctivitis in one
eye, and after we got back, he peed on the carrier. Considering our space
situation at work, I don't know what's going to happen to him when he goes
back tomorrow. I'm hoping he'll be given a cage to see if he can find a
perfect home... but the perfect home for him is no other cats, no dogs, no
kids (he bites - not often, but when he does, it's a hard bite), someone
with behavioral experience to work on manners with him. It may be that

with
his history, he just won't be deemed adoptable.

So. Here's hoping that I get back from work tomorrow with good news

instead
of bad.




  #4  
Old November 8th 03, 07:03 AM
Dee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

hmm...food for thought?

On Sat, 8 Nov 2003, onebyone wrote:

The bad news: Elmo is spraying. Marking. Four times in the last month or

so.
He's a very handsome white w/ orange, a little under 7 years, front
declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination problems. He's
had a urinalysis and

the vet said it seems to be stress-related, the
marking, as there's nothing in his urine to explain it.


*** declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination
problems.

*** the vet said it seems to be stress-related

***** declawed


  #5  
Old November 8th 03, 07:03 AM
Dee
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

hmm...food for thought?

On Sat, 8 Nov 2003, onebyone wrote:

The bad news: Elmo is spraying. Marking. Four times in the last month or

so.
He's a very handsome white w/ orange, a little under 7 years, front
declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination problems. He's
had a urinalysis and

the vet said it seems to be stress-related, the
marking, as there's nothing in his urine to explain it.


*** declawed, surrendered for (surprise!) improper elimination
problems.

*** the vet said it seems to be stress-related

***** declawed


 




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