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Hiding Cat



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 31st 04, 01:58 PM
jimperrin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Hiding Cat

Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda


  #2  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This will take time and patience. I think she should be placed in a
comfortable room of her own with litter, water, food and a bed. Gradually,
sit in the room with her while she eats so she will associate you with food.
Slowly have her get to know you and the other cat by small exposures. This
cat is very frightened and should be socialized very slowly. The often make
the best pets when they grow to trust.
GAil
"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby
cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a
fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second
is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have
anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I
scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear
relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda




  #3  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This will take time and patience. I think she should be placed in a
comfortable room of her own with litter, water, food and a bed. Gradually,
sit in the room with her while she eats so she will associate you with food.
Slowly have her get to know you and the other cat by small exposures. This
cat is very frightened and should be socialized very slowly. The often make
the best pets when they grow to trust.
GAil
"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby
cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a
fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second
is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have
anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I
scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear
relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda




  #4  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

This will take time and patience. I think she should be placed in a
comfortable room of her own with litter, water, food and a bed. Gradually,
sit in the room with her while she eats so she will associate you with food.
Slowly have her get to know you and the other cat by small exposures. This
cat is very frightened and should be socialized very slowly. The often make
the best pets when they grow to trust.
GAil
"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby
cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a
fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second
is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have
anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I
scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear
relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda




  #5  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby

cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a

fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second

is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have

anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I

scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear

relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda


I don't think scolding will do a whole lot of good. Your best bet is to
observe carefully and see if you can find a warning sign that she's had
enough petting before she bites. When she's had enough stop and put her
down. Some times you make more trust brownie points letting them come to
you. Some cats just tolerate/enjoy less petting than others.

If you decide you don't want this cat please try to find a rescue group who
will give her a chance at another home. I would fear that the SPCA might put
her down quickly because of the history of biting.

W


  #6  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby

cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a

fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second

is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have

anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I

scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear

relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda


I don't think scolding will do a whole lot of good. Your best bet is to
observe carefully and see if you can find a warning sign that she's had
enough petting before she bites. When she's had enough stop and put her
down. Some times you make more trust brownie points letting them come to
you. Some cats just tolerate/enjoy less petting than others.

If you decide you don't want this cat please try to find a rescue group who
will give her a chance at another home. I would fear that the SPCA might put
her down quickly because of the history of biting.

W


  #7  
Old August 31st 04, 02:59 PM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"jimperrin" wrote in message
.cable.rogers.com...
Hi:

About two months ago I got a "free-to-a-good-home" four-year-old tabby

cat.
Ever since it arrived, it sits on a shelf in the basement and except for
nocternal eating rarely comes out.

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a

fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.
(My right arm and hand is shredded, I'm thinking of amputating it!)

I got a second cat in the hopes of drawing the first one out. (The second

is
marvellous - moved in a took over!) No luck, the second won't have

anything
to do with the first.

I read about the petting/attack issues and now wear heavy gloves and I

scold
her verbally when she bites me. I'm actually having a love/fear

relationship
with this critter.

Any ideas on how I can draw this beast out of her lion's den and turn her
into a sociable cat, or should I quit while I'm ahead and have her sent to
the SPCA?

Jim
Orillia, Ontario, Cananda


I don't think scolding will do a whole lot of good. Your best bet is to
observe carefully and see if you can find a warning sign that she's had
enough petting before she bites. When she's had enough stop and put her
down. Some times you make more trust brownie points letting them come to
you. Some cats just tolerate/enjoy less petting than others.

If you decide you don't want this cat please try to find a rescue group who
will give her a chance at another home. I would fear that the SPCA might put
her down quickly because of the history of biting.

W


  #8  
Old September 2nd 04, 07:46 PM
Marievulsion
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.


I have a cat just like this. Please don't give up on her yet. If she's
craving attention and getting friendlier, you're making progress. Some cats
are more skittish than others. These cats must be approached more judiciously
than their extroverted counterparts.

Someone suggested earlier that you take note of what you're doing when she does
try to bite. This is excellent advice. With my excessively shy cat, I've
found that simply extending my hand and letting her set the tempo for petting
usually suffices. When she backs off, I daren't pursue.

Although it may work on a boistrous kitten, I too fail to see the use in
scolding, that's more likely to further frighten her. Perhaps keeping contact
brief and positive would be a more effective strategy in winning her over.

She may never be a cozy, 'perfect' housecat, but the shy ones make wonderful
companions in their own right. Best of luck with her. Please post a progress
report or feel free to e-mail me.
  #9  
Old September 2nd 04, 07:46 PM
Marievulsion
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.


I have a cat just like this. Please don't give up on her yet. If she's
craving attention and getting friendlier, you're making progress. Some cats
are more skittish than others. These cats must be approached more judiciously
than their extroverted counterparts.

Someone suggested earlier that you take note of what you're doing when she does
try to bite. This is excellent advice. With my excessively shy cat, I've
found that simply extending my hand and letting her set the tempo for petting
usually suffices. When she backs off, I daren't pursue.

Although it may work on a boistrous kitten, I too fail to see the use in
scolding, that's more likely to further frighten her. Perhaps keeping contact
brief and positive would be a more effective strategy in winning her over.

She may never be a cozy, 'perfect' housecat, but the shy ones make wonderful
companions in their own right. Best of luck with her. Please post a progress
report or feel free to e-mail me.
  #10  
Old September 2nd 04, 07:46 PM
Marievulsion
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

It has been getting friendlier, craves attention, but does give me a fairly
vicious bite occassionally when I'm petting her, trying to gain her trust.


I have a cat just like this. Please don't give up on her yet. If she's
craving attention and getting friendlier, you're making progress. Some cats
are more skittish than others. These cats must be approached more judiciously
than their extroverted counterparts.

Someone suggested earlier that you take note of what you're doing when she does
try to bite. This is excellent advice. With my excessively shy cat, I've
found that simply extending my hand and letting her set the tempo for petting
usually suffices. When she backs off, I daren't pursue.

Although it may work on a boistrous kitten, I too fail to see the use in
scolding, that's more likely to further frighten her. Perhaps keeping contact
brief and positive would be a more effective strategy in winning her over.

She may never be a cozy, 'perfect' housecat, but the shy ones make wonderful
companions in their own right. Best of luck with her. Please post a progress
report or feel free to e-mail me.
 




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