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The benefits of controlling humidity



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 23rd 18, 07:19 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
John Doe[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 174
Default The benefits of controlling humidity

After over 5 years experience...

I believe controlling humidity has done much good for my cats. It is
easy enough. Buy a couple of dirt cheap humidity sensors from the local
megastore (multiple meters provides more accuracy). Then use your air
conditioner, maybe in combination with an inexpensive dehumidifier, to
keep the humidity at no more than about 50%.

Fleas cannot propagate unless the humidity is over 50%. It has helped
with skin conditions, possibly due to lack of fleas. And then of course
there are benefits to human beings. Fleas can check in, but they don't
check out
  #2  
Old July 23rd 18, 08:32 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Peter W.[_2_]
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Posts: 6
Default The benefits of controlling humidity

On Monday, July 23, 2018 at 2:19:43 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
After over 5 years experience...

I believe controlling humidity has done much good for my cats. It is
easy enough. Buy a couple of dirt cheap humidity sensors from the local
megastore (multiple meters provides more accuracy). Then use your air
conditioner, maybe in combination with an inexpensive dehumidifier, to
keep the humidity at no more than about 50%.

Fleas cannot propagate unless the humidity is over 50%. It has helped
with skin conditions, possibly due to lack of fleas. And then of course
there are benefits to human beings. Fleas can check in, but they don't
check out


This is true, except: If fleas are feeding, they are staying hydrated. And:

a) Fleas are only one parasite when keeping cats. Others include mites, worms, bedbugs (yes, bedbugs) and mosquitoes (vector for worms of several types).
b) A single systemic will control for all of the above.
c) Attempting to maintain even a moderately sized house below 50% relative humidity in the summer months can be expensive - it is almost entirely done by refrigeration.
d) And unless the cats are confined to a small area, the dehumidification needs to be done throughout the entire house.
e) And those using swamp-coolers are SOL.
f) If the system is allowed to go back up over 50%s sporadically, the fleas (and their eggs) will be just fine.

Note also: At least in the US, most central air conditioners are vastly over-sized. Such that running them long enough to dehumidify will drop inside temperatures to unacceptable levels - which will feel clammy. And, of course, will reduce the effectiveness of the system.

Therefore - if dehumidification is the true goal, then a purpose-build dehumidifier is the only way to fly. That cools the air and removes the condensate, then reheats the air, reducing humidity even further - and how it is done in commercial applications with central chillers.

The typical dehumidifier costs between upwards of $20/month to operate, and are good for about 200 square feet. Do the math. To purchase one will be between $70 and $300 - depending on how often you want to empty them, and their effectiveness. Again, do the math.

Brush out your cats, give them the correct systemic, feed them properly - and you will not have an issue with parasites, nor the problems that come from them. Keep your house comfortable for yourself - and understand that what is comfortable for you is generally cooler than what cats prefer. Long or short haired, they prefer 75 - 78F. Summer and winter. Not easy to achieve when one is trying to refrigerate so as to drop humidity.
  #3  
Old July 24th 18, 04:08 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav,free.spam
John Doe[_2_]
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Posts: 174
Default The benefits of controlling humidity

No thanks...

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On Monday, July 23, 2018 at 2:19:43 PM UTC-4, John Doe wrote:
After over 5 years experience...

I believe controlling humidity has done much good for my cats. It is
easy enough. Buy a couple of dirt cheap humidity sensors from the local


megastore (multiple meters provides more accuracy). Then use your air
conditioner, maybe in combination with an inexpensive dehumidifier, to
keep the humidity at no more than about 50%.

Fleas cannot propagate unless the humidity is over 50%. It has helped
with skin conditions, possibly due to lack of fleas. And then of course


there are benefits to human beings. Fleas can check in, but they don't
check out


This is true, except: If fleas are feeding, they are staying hydrated. And:

a) Fleas are only one parasite when keeping cats. Others include mites, worms, bedbugs (yes, bedbugs) and mosquitoes (vector for worms of several types).
b) A single systemic will control for all of the above.
c) Attempting to maintain even a moderately sized house below 50% relative humidity in the summer months can be expensive - it is almost entirely done by refrigeration.
d) And unless the cats are confined to a small area, the dehumidification needs to be done throughout the entire house.
e) And those using swamp-coolers are SOL.
f) If the system is allowed to go back up over 50%s sporadically, the fleas (and their eggs) will be just fine.

Note also: At least in the US, most central air conditioners are vastly over-sized. Such that running them long enough to dehumidify will drop inside temperatures to unacceptable levels - which will feel clammy. And, of course, will reduce the effectiveness of the system.

Therefore - if dehumidification is the true goal, then a purpose-build dehumidifier is the only way to fly. That cools the air and removes the condensate, then reheats the air, reducing humidity even further - and how it is done in commercial applications with central chillers.

The typical dehumidifier costs between upwards of $20/month to operate, and are good for about 200 square feet. Do the math. To purchase one will be between $70 and $300 - depending on how often you want to empty them, and their effectiveness. Again, do the math.

Brush out your cats, give them the correct systemic, feed them properly - and you will not have an issue with parasites, nor the problems that come from them. Keep your house comfortable for yourself - and understand that what is comfortable for you is generally cooler than what cats prefer. Long or short haired, they prefer 75 - 78F. Summer and winter. Not easy to achieve when one is trying to refrigerate so as to drop humidity.



 




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