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Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 30th 20, 01:14 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Laura Fenik
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Posts: 16
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

We have a beautiful, white, almost seven years young female cat who has
been unfortunately diagnosed with myelofibrosis and non-regenerative
anemia.

Thus far, we've had no luck with finding a specialty veterinarian who can
treat these two diseases with a positive outcome. I find it very
frustrating that no one seems to have a cure, help or answers for feline
myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia.

Of course, we are told by many to make an appointment. That we'd gladly do
and have done with about six veterinarians in three different states.

We don't mind making an appointment and paying, if we can find a
specialist who can provide definitive help with feline myelofibrosis and
non-regenerative anemia.

I've reached out to various veterinary departments at universities and
such, to no avail. I thank very much, those who pointed me in these
directions and gave me advice on other feline matters.

Why on earth, in this era are there not more answers, a cure, treatment(s)
for feline myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia? I've read about stem
cell transplant and understand that there can be serious side effects. I
also understand that Ruxolitinib (trade names Jakafi and Jakavi) is a drug
that is used to treat myelofibrosis but I don't know enough about it.

Can anyone point me in the right direction to get answers about feline
myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia? A veterinarian that specializes
in these two diseases? Or a scientist or anyone else who could help?
Websites or other Usenet groups that could provide answers or help?

We are in Cambria County, Pennsylvania.

Thank you in advance for any and all help.


  #2  
Old June 30th 20, 02:24 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
John Doe[_2_]
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Posts: 185
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Laura Fenik wrote:

Of course, we are told by many to make an appointment. That we'd
gladly do and have done with about six veterinarians in three
different states.


Apparently your neighborhood is different. Here, if it is suffering, I
would euthanize it and concentrate on cats that have basic needs, there
are plenty around here.

Good luck, whatever you do.
  #3  
Old June 30th 20, 02:54 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Mack A. Damia[_2_]
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Posts: 19
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

On Tue, 30 Jun 2020 00:14:27 -0000 (UTC), Laura Fenik
wrote:

We have a beautiful, white, almost seven years young female cat who has
been unfortunately diagnosed with myelofibrosis and non-regenerative
anemia.

Thus far, we've had no luck with finding a specialty veterinarian who can
treat these two diseases with a positive outcome. I find it very
frustrating that no one seems to have a cure, help or answers for feline
myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia.

Of course, we are told by many to make an appointment. That we'd gladly do
and have done with about six veterinarians in three different states.

We don't mind making an appointment and paying, if we can find a
specialist who can provide definitive help with feline myelofibrosis and
non-regenerative anemia.

I've reached out to various veterinary departments at universities and
such, to no avail. I thank very much, those who pointed me in these
directions and gave me advice on other feline matters.

Why on earth, in this era are there not more answers, a cure, treatment(s)
for feline myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia? I've read about stem
cell transplant and understand that there can be serious side effects. I
also understand that Ruxolitinib (trade names Jakafi and Jakavi) is a drug
that is used to treat myelofibrosis but I don't know enough about it.

Can anyone point me in the right direction to get answers about feline
myelofibrosis and non-regenerative anemia? A veterinarian that specializes
in these two diseases? Or a scientist or anyone else who could help?
Websites or other Usenet groups that could provide answers or help?

We are in Cambria County, Pennsylvania.

Thank you in advance for any and all help.


This one is Penn State:

https://agsci.psu.edu/industry/services

Try Pitt. This is the Bradford campus:

https://bradford.pitt.edu/academics/...inary-medicine

Colleges and universities with schools of veterinary medicine will
give you advice and assistance. Find the schools in your general area
and phone them.

  #4  
Old June 30th 20, 04:31 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Laura Fenik
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Posts: 16
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Thanks for the good luck, John.

Take care
  #5  
Old June 30th 20, 04:42 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Laura Fenik
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Posts: 16
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Thank you very much, Mack (that's a great Usenet name). I will definitely
be reaching out to Penn State's Animal Diagnostic Laboratory and U. of
Pitt's Bradford Pre-Veterinary Medicine department.

You have pointed me in a good direction from my previous post back in
March.

Take care
  #6  
Old June 30th 20, 12:12 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Peter W.[_2_]
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Posts: 21
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

As I am sure you understand, it is the first condition that is causing the second. They are not separate processes, although they have separate names.

Myelofibrosis is progressive, and the treatments are best described as 'heroic' and something that *will* be painful for the animal as well as pretty much ongoing for the rest of her life. These include treatments using a combination of steroids and male hormones or thalidomide, transfusions, up to a bone marrow transplant.

The side-effects can be wretched, painful and often fatal.

Just to touch on the best chance of a cure - a bone marrow transplant - and that chance is only about 20% in cats, you will find that the procedure starts somewhere around US$20,000 and upwards from there for the post-op treatments. Not to mention the difficulty of finding a donor.

So, here is your dilemma: Spending (at least) somewhere in five figures for your cat, a sum that could do massive amounts of good in these troubled times, or come to terms with losing her, while having control on how that loss transpires. You might also look into volunteering your cat in a research program for Myelofibrosis if such a thing exists. But, again, none of these options will make the cat actually feel any better immediately, and the most likely outcome is that she will feel much worse.

Best prognosis, in general, is between 6 and 8 months, with progressive and painful deterioration in her health.

Were this my cat, I would have her euthanized while she still had some quality of life.
  #7  
Old July 12th 20, 05:03 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Laura Fenik
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Posts: 16
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Thank you, Peter, for your logical and helpful advice. Yes, we understand
the the myelofibrosis is causing the anemia.

What dosage of thalidomide or steroids and male hormones are recommended
for a 10 pound cat and are there any medical white papers for my
veterinarian to read about the efficacy of these treatments?

We do not want to cause Victoria additional pain or have her feel worse.

We will be giving all of this very careful thought.


On Tue, 30 Jun 2020 04:12:47 -0700, Peter W. wrote:

  #8  
Old July 12th 20, 11:22 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Peter W.[_2_]
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Posts: 21
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Dosage: 50 mg/cat sid-bid

Administration: When sid, give in the evening to account for natural sedative effect.

There is plenty of literature on the subject - but one requires membership to most sources. Your vet will typically be a member.

This is not a medication to be given willy-nilly, or by a non-professional. I do not expect that your cat will be having kittens, at the same time, a drug of this nature is incredibly dangerous if abused.
  #9  
Old July 15th 20, 07:48 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Laura Fenik
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Posts: 16
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Thank you, Peter.

What about dosage for steroids / male hormones?

No, Victoria will not be having kittens. If we choose to go with these
medications, we will conduct a thorough research and consult with
veterinarians.



On Sun, 12 Jul 2020 03:22:56 -0700, Peter W. wrote:

  #10  
Old July 16th 20, 03:25 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Peter W.[_2_]
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Posts: 21
Default Where can I find help for feline Myelofibrosis + Anemia

Laura:

Steroids and similar treatments are based on a number of factors that cannot be determine at a distance, or other than the prescribing vet:

a) Weight and age of the animal.
b) Purpose of the treatment - long-term or condition-specific.
c) Intended result - palliative or cure.
d) Tolerance of side-effects - what level of temporary or permanent side-effect is acceptable during or as a result of the treatment.

When our middle-male cat was getting over his blockage five years ago, he was treated with a 5-day course of steroids to reduce the inflamed urethra and bladder, including a very high first-dose, titrating down to a final low dose on the 5th day. But had he stayed on the first dose, he would not have lasted 10 days - it was that high. Our oldest dog (female Scottie, age 12) is on a very low maintenance dose of prednisone for her eyes, a tiny fraction of what the cat got, and she weighs 7 pounds more than he does (25 vs. 18 pounds). So, you get the picture.
 




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