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turning down the heat?



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 16th 04, 03:07 AM
Cheryl
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Default turning down the heat?

JLove98905 wrote in on
15 Jan 2004:

Just curious....how low do people turn the heat down during the day
(when they are at work, etc), for the cats? We leave ours at about 60,
but I'm wondering if it's more than they need.

That's about what I set mine to, and what it is at night for sleeping.
Though today I left it at 65 because I had to separate a very aggressive
one to the downstairs and it gets colder down there. When it is cold you
can tell they don't much like it if they are indoor cats and used to the
even temps. They spend more time balled up and the fur looks fluffier.



--
Cheryl

I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine. And he shall be my Squishy.
Come here Squishy. Ow. Bad Squishy.
- Dori
  #2  
Old January 16th 04, 03:26 AM
MaryL
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"JLove98905" wrote in message
...
Just curious....how low do people turn the heat down during the day (when

they
are at work, etc), for the cats? We leave ours at about 60, but I'm

wondering
if it's more than they need.

-Jen
Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright



I leave mine at 67 (but I live in East Texas, where bills for heating are
not bad). My highest bills are for air conditioning in the summer. I like
it fairly cool, so I generally set the thermostat for 72 in the summer when
I am home and raise it to 75 when I will be gone for the day. Incidentally,
I don't think there is a great deal of savings (at least in this climate) if
the temperature is altered drastically for the day because then it takes
more time to raise/lower the temperature to the "desired" level after I
return home.

MaryL


  #3  
Old January 16th 04, 03:26 AM
MaryL
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Posts: n/a
Default


"JLove98905" wrote in message
...
Just curious....how low do people turn the heat down during the day (when

they
are at work, etc), for the cats? We leave ours at about 60, but I'm

wondering
if it's more than they need.

-Jen
Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright



I leave mine at 67 (but I live in East Texas, where bills for heating are
not bad). My highest bills are for air conditioning in the summer. I like
it fairly cool, so I generally set the thermostat for 72 in the summer when
I am home and raise it to 75 when I will be gone for the day. Incidentally,
I don't think there is a great deal of savings (at least in this climate) if
the temperature is altered drastically for the day because then it takes
more time to raise/lower the temperature to the "desired" level after I
return home.

MaryL


  #4  
Old January 16th 04, 03:32 AM
JLove98905
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Default

I posted the question because I'm in Boston, and it's really cold here right
now. These wicked cold snaps are gonna be murder on my heating bill (oil). If I
could get away with lower than 60 during the day, I probably would. However, I
don't want to go too low.
-Jen
Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright


  #5  
Old January 16th 04, 03:32 AM
JLove98905
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I posted the question because I'm in Boston, and it's really cold here right
now. These wicked cold snaps are gonna be murder on my heating bill (oil). If I
could get away with lower than 60 during the day, I probably would. However, I
don't want to go too low.
-Jen
Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright


  #6  
Old January 16th 04, 03:44 AM
Cheryl
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MaryL wrote in on 15 Jan 2004:

Incidentally,
I don't think there is a great deal of savings (at least in this
climate) if the temperature is altered drastically for the day because
then it takes more time to raise/lower the temperature to the
"desired" level after I return home.


That definately depends on the type of heating used. I have a heat pump
and live in the east where it gets cold in the winter. There is a huge
difference depending on if you're raising the temp, (winter) or lowering it
(summer) when you come home. It is most cost effective in the winter to
lower it, yet in the summer leave it where it is. Also, for those with heat
pumps it is good to remember that they are efficient when the temp outside
is around freezing, but if way below, to turn on the e-heat (or alt heat,
whatever your manufacturer designates it) and that type of heat is not
energy efficiant and you NEED to turn it down. Heat pumps can't convert
cold outdoor air to warm air if below a certain temp.

--
Cheryl

I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine. And he shall be my Squishy.
Come here Squishy. Ow. Bad Squishy.
- Dori
  #7  
Old January 16th 04, 03:44 AM
Cheryl
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

MaryL wrote in on 15 Jan 2004:

Incidentally,
I don't think there is a great deal of savings (at least in this
climate) if the temperature is altered drastically for the day because
then it takes more time to raise/lower the temperature to the
"desired" level after I return home.


That definately depends on the type of heating used. I have a heat pump
and live in the east where it gets cold in the winter. There is a huge
difference depending on if you're raising the temp, (winter) or lowering it
(summer) when you come home. It is most cost effective in the winter to
lower it, yet in the summer leave it where it is. Also, for those with heat
pumps it is good to remember that they are efficient when the temp outside
is around freezing, but if way below, to turn on the e-heat (or alt heat,
whatever your manufacturer designates it) and that type of heat is not
energy efficiant and you NEED to turn it down. Heat pumps can't convert
cold outdoor air to warm air if below a certain temp.

--
Cheryl

I shall call him Squishy and he shall be mine. And he shall be my Squishy.
Come here Squishy. Ow. Bad Squishy.
- Dori
  #10  
Old January 16th 04, 05:36 AM
Betsy
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Default

I turn mine down to 55 at night and only raise it to 60 during the day,
unless I am teaching at home, when I raise it to 65. It's all I can afford.
I've done it this way for years and I have 11 healthy cats and a collie. It
does get crowded in the bed at night, though!

"JLove98905" wrote in message
...
Just curious....how low do people turn the heat down during the day (when

they
are at work, etc), for the cats? We leave ours at about 60, but I'm

wondering
if it's more than they need.

-Jen
Half the people you know are below average. -Steven Wright




 




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