A cat forum. CatBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » CatBanter forum » Cat Newsgroups » Cat health & behaviour
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Best wet food for keeping cystitis away?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #21  
Old September 13th 03, 06:34 AM
GAUBSTER2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I honestly don't know whether or not they use feeding trials. Can you prove
that they don't or are you just saying it to bash them?


I'm not bashing anyone, I'm simply pointing out facts and reality. If you
don't believe me, pick up a can and read the AAFCO statement. Since AAFCO
standards are so easy to pass, why don't they even try?

"8 dogs older than 1 yr. must start the test. At start all dogs must be
normal
weight & health. A blood test is to be taken from each dog at the start and
finish of the test. For 6 months, the dogs used must only eat the food being
tested. The dogs finishing the test must not
lose more than 15% of their body weight. During the test, none of the
dogs used are to die or be removed because of nutritional causes. 6
of the 8 dogs starting must finish the test."

This is take from AAFCO directly. So, according to them, 25% of the dogs
being
tested can die while eating the food being tested, and the food will still
pass.


You're reading this completely wrong and inserting your biases into it. If at
least 6 of the 8 dogs must finish the test....that doesn't mean that 2 of the
dogs have to die. They must simply FINISH the test. Why do you assume the
worst?
  #22  
Old September 13th 03, 06:34 AM
GAUBSTER2
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I honestly don't know whether or not they use feeding trials. Can you prove
that they don't or are you just saying it to bash them?


I'm not bashing anyone, I'm simply pointing out facts and reality. If you
don't believe me, pick up a can and read the AAFCO statement. Since AAFCO
standards are so easy to pass, why don't they even try?

"8 dogs older than 1 yr. must start the test. At start all dogs must be
normal
weight & health. A blood test is to be taken from each dog at the start and
finish of the test. For 6 months, the dogs used must only eat the food being
tested. The dogs finishing the test must not
lose more than 15% of their body weight. During the test, none of the
dogs used are to die or be removed because of nutritional causes. 6
of the 8 dogs starting must finish the test."

This is take from AAFCO directly. So, according to them, 25% of the dogs
being
tested can die while eating the food being tested, and the food will still
pass.


You're reading this completely wrong and inserting your biases into it. If at
least 6 of the 8 dogs must finish the test....that doesn't mean that 2 of the
dogs have to die. They must simply FINISH the test. Why do you assume the
worst?
  #23  
Old September 13th 03, 10:21 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Brian or Sharon Beuchaw" wrote in message
...
Hello,

First, let me thank y'all for the wealth of information that's been in
here and archived - it's a *wonderful* resource. It's very much
appreciated....


Just be sure you consult your vet before following any medical advice you
obtain on the internet. These newsgroups should not be used as a
replacement for professional veterinary care. Also be wary of extremists
and fanatics with agendas.


And hopefully this will be an easy question for y'all - our 5 year old
female recently developed cystitis w/o crystals (and from what I've read,
stress and eating dry food may aggravate it,


You're correct. In fact a recent study published in the Journal of the
American Veterinary Association concluded:

"Results suggest that idiopathic cystitis (IC) occurs commonly in cats with
stranguria, hematuria, pollakiuria, or inappropriate elimination and is
associated with consumption of dry foods." (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997 Jan
1;210(1):46-50).

This doesn't necessarily mean that dry food actually causes IC, but that dry
food probably unmasks or aggravates the disorder in cats that are
predisposed to it.

In a highly regarded veterinary textbook, the same researchers at Ohio State
University stated::

"We believe that stress is important in the development of recurrence of
signs in cats with IC and may be important in precipitating the first
episode of signs in susceptible animals.".


and we just got a new kitten
a few weeks ago and she eats dry food). I've read numerous posts about
wet food being best, so we need to switch.


Absolutely! Even though cats fed dry food drink ~6X more water than cats
fed canned food, their total water intake is about *half* and their urine
volume is lower than in cats fed canned food.. Increased water intake has
several benefits for cats with IC (actually for all cats). Higher water
intake and urine volume results in more frequent urination which reduces
urine contact time with the bladder wall and dilution of any noxious
substances in the urine. Frequent urination also reduces the risk of urinary
tract infections.


Which wet food (readily
available at either the grocery store or Petsmart) would be best for
keeping cystitis at bay for the rest of her life? Or does it really
matter what brand as long as it's wet and the cat likes it and eats it?



I wholeheartedly recommend a high quality canned food that's compounded from
a fixed formula, such as Science Diet. "Fixed formula" means that the
proportion and quality of the ingredients don't fluctuate with the market
prices of the ingredients. So there's little, if any, variation in the food
from batch to batch


She's also got the herpes virus, which flared up into a swollen eye during
her first year and again about 3 years later, so we're thinking it's
possible the cystitis could recur if it's aggravated by the virus and
stress.


One last suggestion. You might want to speak to your vet about a
glycosaminoglycan (GAG) supplement (glucosamine/chondroitin). A possible
cause of IC may be a defect in the GAG layer that coats the bladder
epithelium. A defect in the GAG layer might allow urine to penetrate the
urothelium and induce inflammation. Some of the same substances present in
cartilage.are also present in the GAG layer that lines the bladder wall. So
a GAG supplement may strengthen and maintain the integrity of the GAG layer
of the bladder wall.

One of these supplements (Cosequin For Cats - [Nutramax Laboratories]) is
specially formulated for cats in chicken and tuna flavored sprinkle
capsules.
http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/veterinary/cosequincat.htm


Best of luck,

Phil


  #24  
Old September 13th 03, 10:21 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Brian or Sharon Beuchaw" wrote in message
...
Hello,

First, let me thank y'all for the wealth of information that's been in
here and archived - it's a *wonderful* resource. It's very much
appreciated....


Just be sure you consult your vet before following any medical advice you
obtain on the internet. These newsgroups should not be used as a
replacement for professional veterinary care. Also be wary of extremists
and fanatics with agendas.


And hopefully this will be an easy question for y'all - our 5 year old
female recently developed cystitis w/o crystals (and from what I've read,
stress and eating dry food may aggravate it,


You're correct. In fact a recent study published in the Journal of the
American Veterinary Association concluded:

"Results suggest that idiopathic cystitis (IC) occurs commonly in cats with
stranguria, hematuria, pollakiuria, or inappropriate elimination and is
associated with consumption of dry foods." (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997 Jan
1;210(1):46-50).

This doesn't necessarily mean that dry food actually causes IC, but that dry
food probably unmasks or aggravates the disorder in cats that are
predisposed to it.

In a highly regarded veterinary textbook, the same researchers at Ohio State
University stated::

"We believe that stress is important in the development of recurrence of
signs in cats with IC and may be important in precipitating the first
episode of signs in susceptible animals.".


and we just got a new kitten
a few weeks ago and she eats dry food). I've read numerous posts about
wet food being best, so we need to switch.


Absolutely! Even though cats fed dry food drink ~6X more water than cats
fed canned food, their total water intake is about *half* and their urine
volume is lower than in cats fed canned food.. Increased water intake has
several benefits for cats with IC (actually for all cats). Higher water
intake and urine volume results in more frequent urination which reduces
urine contact time with the bladder wall and dilution of any noxious
substances in the urine. Frequent urination also reduces the risk of urinary
tract infections.


Which wet food (readily
available at either the grocery store or Petsmart) would be best for
keeping cystitis at bay for the rest of her life? Or does it really
matter what brand as long as it's wet and the cat likes it and eats it?



I wholeheartedly recommend a high quality canned food that's compounded from
a fixed formula, such as Science Diet. "Fixed formula" means that the
proportion and quality of the ingredients don't fluctuate with the market
prices of the ingredients. So there's little, if any, variation in the food
from batch to batch


She's also got the herpes virus, which flared up into a swollen eye during
her first year and again about 3 years later, so we're thinking it's
possible the cystitis could recur if it's aggravated by the virus and
stress.


One last suggestion. You might want to speak to your vet about a
glycosaminoglycan (GAG) supplement (glucosamine/chondroitin). A possible
cause of IC may be a defect in the GAG layer that coats the bladder
epithelium. A defect in the GAG layer might allow urine to penetrate the
urothelium and induce inflammation. Some of the same substances present in
cartilage.are also present in the GAG layer that lines the bladder wall. So
a GAG supplement may strengthen and maintain the integrity of the GAG layer
of the bladder wall.

One of these supplements (Cosequin For Cats - [Nutramax Laboratories]) is
specially formulated for cats in chicken and tuna flavored sprinkle
capsules.
http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/veterinary/cosequincat.htm


Best of luck,

Phil


  #25  
Old September 13th 03, 10:21 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Brian or Sharon Beuchaw" wrote in message
...
Hello,

First, let me thank y'all for the wealth of information that's been in
here and archived - it's a *wonderful* resource. It's very much
appreciated....


Just be sure you consult your vet before following any medical advice you
obtain on the internet. These newsgroups should not be used as a
replacement for professional veterinary care. Also be wary of extremists
and fanatics with agendas.


And hopefully this will be an easy question for y'all - our 5 year old
female recently developed cystitis w/o crystals (and from what I've read,
stress and eating dry food may aggravate it,


You're correct. In fact a recent study published in the Journal of the
American Veterinary Association concluded:

"Results suggest that idiopathic cystitis (IC) occurs commonly in cats with
stranguria, hematuria, pollakiuria, or inappropriate elimination and is
associated with consumption of dry foods." (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997 Jan
1;210(1):46-50).

This doesn't necessarily mean that dry food actually causes IC, but that dry
food probably unmasks or aggravates the disorder in cats that are
predisposed to it.

In a highly regarded veterinary textbook, the same researchers at Ohio State
University stated::

"We believe that stress is important in the development of recurrence of
signs in cats with IC and may be important in precipitating the first
episode of signs in susceptible animals.".


and we just got a new kitten
a few weeks ago and she eats dry food). I've read numerous posts about
wet food being best, so we need to switch.


Absolutely! Even though cats fed dry food drink ~6X more water than cats
fed canned food, their total water intake is about *half* and their urine
volume is lower than in cats fed canned food.. Increased water intake has
several benefits for cats with IC (actually for all cats). Higher water
intake and urine volume results in more frequent urination which reduces
urine contact time with the bladder wall and dilution of any noxious
substances in the urine. Frequent urination also reduces the risk of urinary
tract infections.


Which wet food (readily
available at either the grocery store or Petsmart) would be best for
keeping cystitis at bay for the rest of her life? Or does it really
matter what brand as long as it's wet and the cat likes it and eats it?



I wholeheartedly recommend a high quality canned food that's compounded from
a fixed formula, such as Science Diet. "Fixed formula" means that the
proportion and quality of the ingredients don't fluctuate with the market
prices of the ingredients. So there's little, if any, variation in the food
from batch to batch


She's also got the herpes virus, which flared up into a swollen eye during
her first year and again about 3 years later, so we're thinking it's
possible the cystitis could recur if it's aggravated by the virus and
stress.


One last suggestion. You might want to speak to your vet about a
glycosaminoglycan (GAG) supplement (glucosamine/chondroitin). A possible
cause of IC may be a defect in the GAG layer that coats the bladder
epithelium. A defect in the GAG layer might allow urine to penetrate the
urothelium and induce inflammation. Some of the same substances present in
cartilage.are also present in the GAG layer that lines the bladder wall. So
a GAG supplement may strengthen and maintain the integrity of the GAG layer
of the bladder wall.

One of these supplements (Cosequin For Cats - [Nutramax Laboratories]) is
specially formulated for cats in chicken and tuna flavored sprinkle
capsules.
http://www.nutramaxlabs.com/veterinary/cosequincat.htm


Best of luck,

Phil


  #26  
Old September 13th 03, 10:36 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...

I honestly don't know whether or not they use feeding trials.


You said you read the labels on Science Diet products..... ...or was that
just another one of your conjured up stories to fit a particular discussion?

Its pretty hard to miss the feeding trial statement :right next to the
ingredients list and guaranteed analysis....

"Animal feeding trials using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Science
Diet Adult Feline Maintenance provides complete and balances nutrition for
maintenance of adult cats"




  #27  
Old September 13th 03, 10:36 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...

I honestly don't know whether or not they use feeding trials.


You said you read the labels on Science Diet products..... ...or was that
just another one of your conjured up stories to fit a particular discussion?

Its pretty hard to miss the feeding trial statement :right next to the
ingredients list and guaranteed analysis....

"Animal feeding trials using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Science
Diet Adult Feline Maintenance provides complete and balances nutrition for
maintenance of adult cats"




  #28  
Old September 13th 03, 10:36 AM
Phil P.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...

I honestly don't know whether or not they use feeding trials.


You said you read the labels on Science Diet products..... ...or was that
just another one of your conjured up stories to fit a particular discussion?

Its pretty hard to miss the feeding trial statement :right next to the
ingredients list and guaranteed analysis....

"Animal feeding trials using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Science
Diet Adult Feline Maintenance provides complete and balances nutrition for
maintenance of adult cats"




  #29  
Old September 13th 03, 04:12 PM
Liz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Animal feeding trials using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Science
Diet Adult Feline Maintenance provides complete and balances nutrition for
maintenance of adult cats"


Is that the same AAFCO that never required arachidonic acid to be
added in feline diets? The one that is run mostly by representatives
from the pet food industry?
  #30  
Old September 13th 03, 04:12 PM
Liz
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Animal feeding trials using AAFCO procedures substantiate that Science
Diet Adult Feline Maintenance provides complete and balances nutrition for
maintenance of adult cats"


Is that the same AAFCO that never required arachidonic acid to be
added in feline diets? The one that is run mostly by representatives
from the pet food industry?
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just read about what is really in cat food kate Cat health & behaviour 422 September 3rd 03 01:18 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 01:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 CatBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.