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fast, shallow breathing



 
 
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  #11  
Old July 13th 04, 07:44 PM
---MIKE---
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Tiger breathes normally except when purring. Then his breath rate
doubles. It has always been like that.


---MIKE---

  #12  
Old July 13th 04, 08:24 PM
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Kaeli wrote:
My first thought was an enlarged heart or
congenital lung problems, but those
usually cause other symptoms which it
doesn't sound like she has, such as
stunted growth, poor appetite, lethargy,
and the like.


Not necessarily. There are many cats that have been diagnosed with heart
conditions that have shown none of these symptoms, and there have been
posts here in the past from people who had no idea their cats had a
heart problem until they found them dead. Sometimes the only symptoms of
a heart condition are panting and/or fast shallow breathing, which is
exactly what happened in Omar's case. In all other respects he acted
normal.


Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


  #13  
Old July 13th 04, 08:24 PM
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Kaeli wrote:
My first thought was an enlarged heart or
congenital lung problems, but those
usually cause other symptoms which it
doesn't sound like she has, such as
stunted growth, poor appetite, lethargy,
and the like.


Not necessarily. There are many cats that have been diagnosed with heart
conditions that have shown none of these symptoms, and there have been
posts here in the past from people who had no idea their cats had a
heart problem until they found them dead. Sometimes the only symptoms of
a heart condition are panting and/or fast shallow breathing, which is
exactly what happened in Omar's case. In all other respects he acted
normal.


Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


  #14  
Old July 14th 04, 12:46 AM
Brian Link
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On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:54:47 -0500, wrote:

When running around or otherwise
active, she breathes about 60 - 70 times
per minute, sometimes even panting
briefly.


The average breaths per minute for a cat at rest is 20-30. 60-70, even
with activity, seems high and the cat panting so easily is worrisome.
These symptoms can be indicative of a heart condition. My cat Omar had
these symptoms and was diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.
You should definitely take the kitten in for an exam and talk to your
vet about scheduling an echocardiogram to see if there is indeed a heart
condition. If caught early, and depending on the type of problem, it is
possible to treat with medication and have a good quality of life for
quite some time.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


I'd echo the heart disease caution. My brother's poor cat exhibited
those symptoms, and the vet found heart problems.

Also cats can breathe rapidly and shallowly when in pain or distress.

HOWEVER - balance this with some restraint .. it IS a kitten, and
perhaps it's just whipping itself into a frenzy. Nonetheless, a trip
to the Vet may be a very good idea. Better to catch something early
than have it become life-threatening (and far more expensive to treat)
later.

Brian Link, Minnesota Countertenor
----------------------------------
"I think animal testing is a terrible idea;
they get all nervous and give the wrong answers."
- regmech
  #15  
Old July 14th 04, 12:46 AM
Brian Link
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 13 Jul 2004 12:54:47 -0500, wrote:

When running around or otherwise
active, she breathes about 60 - 70 times
per minute, sometimes even panting
briefly.


The average breaths per minute for a cat at rest is 20-30. 60-70, even
with activity, seems high and the cat panting so easily is worrisome.
These symptoms can be indicative of a heart condition. My cat Omar had
these symptoms and was diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.
You should definitely take the kitten in for an exam and talk to your
vet about scheduling an echocardiogram to see if there is indeed a heart
condition. If caught early, and depending on the type of problem, it is
possible to treat with medication and have a good quality of life for
quite some time.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


I'd echo the heart disease caution. My brother's poor cat exhibited
those symptoms, and the vet found heart problems.

Also cats can breathe rapidly and shallowly when in pain or distress.

HOWEVER - balance this with some restraint .. it IS a kitten, and
perhaps it's just whipping itself into a frenzy. Nonetheless, a trip
to the Vet may be a very good idea. Better to catch something early
than have it become life-threatening (and far more expensive to treat)
later.

Brian Link, Minnesota Countertenor
----------------------------------
"I think animal testing is a terrible idea;
they get all nervous and give the wrong answers."
- regmech
  #16  
Old July 14th 04, 02:07 AM
Rick Vigorous
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The kitten is going to the vet Thursday morning.

Also, I measured her breathing rate a little more accurately this
afternoon. While sleeping, it was a consistent 27 per minute.
  #17  
Old July 14th 04, 02:07 AM
Rick Vigorous
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The kitten is going to the vet Thursday morning.

Also, I measured her breathing rate a little more accurately this
afternoon. While sleeping, it was a consistent 27 per minute.
  #18  
Old July 14th 04, 04:53 AM
bluemaxx
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Hi, Megan. How is Omar doing? My Maxx, who also had dilated
cardiomyopathy, lost his fight and died today. :`(

Would you email off the group please?
Linda

wrote in message
...
: The average breaths per minute for a cat at rest is 20-30. 60-70, even
: with activity, seems high and the cat panting so easily is worrisome.
: These symptoms can be indicative of a heart condition. My cat Omar had
: these symptoms and was diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.
: You should definitely take the kitten in for an exam and talk to your
: vet about scheduling an echocardiogram to see if there is indeed a
heart
: condition. If caught early, and depending on the type of problem, it
is
: possible to treat with medication and have a good quality of life for
: quite some time.
:
: Megan
:
:
:
: "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do
: nothing."
:
: -Edmund Burke
:
: Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
: http://www.stopdeclaw.com
:
: Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
: http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22
:
: "Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
: elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
: splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
: providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the
decision,
: raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings
and
: material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come
his
: way."
:
: - W.H. Murray
:
:


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--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 7/12/2004


  #19  
Old July 14th 04, 04:53 AM
bluemaxx
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Hi, Megan. How is Omar doing? My Maxx, who also had dilated
cardiomyopathy, lost his fight and died today. :`(

Would you email off the group please?
Linda

wrote in message
...
: The average breaths per minute for a cat at rest is 20-30. 60-70, even
: with activity, seems high and the cat panting so easily is worrisome.
: These symptoms can be indicative of a heart condition. My cat Omar had
: these symptoms and was diagnosed with Dilated Cardiomyopathy.
: You should definitely take the kitten in for an exam and talk to your
: vet about scheduling an echocardiogram to see if there is indeed a
heart
: condition. If caught early, and depending on the type of problem, it
is
: possible to treat with medication and have a good quality of life for
: quite some time.
:
: Megan
:
:
:
: "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to
do
: nothing."
:
: -Edmund Burke
:
: Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
: http://www.stopdeclaw.com
:
: Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
: http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22
:
: "Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
: elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
: splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
: providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the
decision,
: raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings
and
: material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come
his
: way."
:
: - W.H. Murray
:
:


---
--
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.719 / Virus Database: 475 - Release Date: 7/12/2004


 




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