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Counting stray cats while cycling at night



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 12th 15, 09:11 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
John Doe[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night

I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
forhead.
  #2  
Old February 13th 15, 10:37 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
forhead.


How do you know that they are stray cats? I ask this as a Brit who doesn't
have any stray cats near me (wish I did as I'd like another)
There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.
In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to buy
one. Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
free is working.
There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.

Tweed






  #3  
Old February 13th 15, 11:28 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
John Doe[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night

"Christina Websell" wrote:
"John Doe" wrote:


I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like
moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny
specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
your forhead.


How do you know that they are stray cats?


It wasn't difficult.

I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
did as I'd like another)


How do you know that for a fact?

There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.


I would say there are too many in my neighborhood. I don't know about
other neighborhoods. Obviously you don't either.

In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to
buy one.


I hope you're not talking about a pet store.

Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
free is working. There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.


Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
could.

I do wish more people would get their animals from the Humane Society
instead of from a breeder or a pet store. Then again, that means there
are some gems to be had out there for those of us who care. I brought in
a Calico that's exceptionally well marked, looks better than the Calicos
that come up in a Google image search.
  #4  
Old February 13th 15, 11:40 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
"Christina Websell" wrote:
"John Doe" wrote:


I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like
moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny
specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
your forhead.


How do you know that they are stray cats?


It wasn't difficult.

I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
did as I'd like another)


How do you know that?


How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're not
there..





  #5  
Old February 14th 15, 12:21 AM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
John Doe[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 161
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night

"Christina Websell" wrote:

"John Doe" wrote
"Christina Websell" wrote:
"John Doe" wrote:


I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked
like moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny
tiny specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see
all the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the
store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
your forhead.

How do you know that they are stray cats?


It wasn't difficult.

I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
did as I'd like another)


How do you know that?


How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're
not there..


Try using a modern LED headlamp...
  #6  
Old February 14th 15, 07:57 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Dick Ballard[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night

On Fri, 13 Feb 2015 22:37:30 -0000, "Christina Websell"
wrote:


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my forhead
at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked like moderate to
heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny tiny specks of pollen.
It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see all
the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to your
forhead.


How do you know that they are stray cats? I ask this as a Brit who doesn't
have any stray cats near me (wish I did as I'd like another)
There seems to be a huge stray/feral cat problem in America.
In my locality, kittens are a rare thing. It costs 80 US dollars to buy
one. Which is good and suggests the spay/neuter program which offers it
free is working.
There's no "free to a good home" kittens near me.

Tweed



Strays or pets? I see other pet cats in my neighborhood (western US),
but few ferals. There are other locations where the feral population
is a problem, and organizations have been formed to
trap/neuter/release as a form of population control.

I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
many in Britain.

In the US, however, there seems to be a strong bias that pet cats MUST
be kept indoors and properly entertained with all sorts of artificial
and fabricated toys & equipment. Most of the privately owned shelters
require an "indoor only" agreement for adoption. The larger
municipally supported agencies are more liberal on this point.

Dick
  #7  
Old February 15th 15, 06:45 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
"Christina Websell" wrote:

"John Doe" wrote
"Christina Websell" wrote:
"John Doe" wrote:

I bought a powerful LED headlamp. Took it for a ride after dark two
nights ago. It was warm out but having the thing strapped to my
forhead at eye level, it is so powerful I could see what looked
like moderate to heavy snowfall that was probably actually teeny
tiny specks of pollen. It was not mist, unfortunately.

Perhaps more importantly... In my peripheral vision, in the light's
outer coverage area, without turning my head to look, I could see
all the little pairs of cat eyes peering at me on the way to the
store.

The modern LED headlamp is like having car headlights strapped to
your forhead.

How do you know that they are stray cats?

It wasn't difficult.

I ask this as a Brit who doesn't have any stray cats near me (wish I
did as I'd like another)

How do you know that?


How do I know I haven't stray cats near me? Probably because they're
not there..


Try using a modern LED headlamp...


It's different here in the UK. I would find a lot of of eyes from cats who
are allowed out as indoor/outdoor cats.
Including Boyfie.




  #8  
Old February 15th 15, 07:09 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night


"Dick Ballard" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 13 Feb 2015 22:37:30 -0000, "Christina Websell"
wrote:

Strays or pets? I see other pet cats in my neighborhood (western US),
but few ferals. There are other locations where the feral population
is a problem, and organizations have been formed to
trap/neuter/release as a form of population control.

I think there is a cultural difference between the US and UK regarding
free roaming pet cats. I get the impression from some sources that NOT
allowing one's pet cat to free roam is considered a form of abuse by
many in Britain.


Yes.

In the US, however, there seems to be a strong bias that pet cats MUST
be kept indoors and properly entertained with all sorts of artificial
and fabricated toys & equipment. Most of the privately owned shelters
require an "indoor only" agreement for adoption. The larger
municipally supported agencies are more liberal on this point.

Dick


I'm not going to enter into an argument. It's my opinion that cats like to
go out in UK and they should. If I adopted a cat from a shelter here they
wouldn't let me keep it totally in the house.





  #9  
Old February 15th 15, 08:01 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
Christina Websell
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,985
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night


"John Doe" wrote in message
...
Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the

bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
could.


?? Bubonic plague was caused by black rats in the 1600's. I doubt you got
it over in the USA at that time.


  #10  
Old February 15th 15, 09:34 PM posted to rec.pets.cats.health+behav
buglady[_2_]
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Posts: 88
Default Counting stray cats while cycling at night

On 2/13/2015 6:28 PM, John Doe wrote:
Having fewer stray cats in Europe nowadays probably helps keep the
bubonic plague away. You all were nearly wiped out and traumatized by
the bubonic plague, makes sense that you are scared to death of stray
animals. I hope something like that never happens here, but I fear it
could.

...........Huh? Bubonic plague comes from fleas on rats or other
rodents. Cats killed rats. Unfortunately cats can be killed by the
plague too, so things only got worse over time. The major factor of
spread was the rats on the ships, which transported it all over. And
there already is bubonic plague here popping up occasionally in AZ.

http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/oids/vector/plague/

..........She's saying the cats in the UK are owned, not strays, not that
there aren't cats all over outside.

buglady
take out the dog before replying
 




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