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Female Cats Not Getting Along and the Consequences



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 21st 03, 09:01 PM
Tracy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Female Cats Not Getting Along and the Consequences

This may be a bit long, but please bear with me : I sorely need some
advice here.

We have two cats, Callie and Flower. Callie is 16 months, Maine Coon
mix and was adopted at 6 months old from the Anti-Cruelty Society in
Chicago. She's a great cat and we adore her. We moved back to Northern
California with her a month ago and decided to act on a long-standing
thought about getting a companion cat for Callie, especially once I
returned to a full-time work schedule. We didn't do so in Chicago, as
I was doing much of my work from home there and we also felt strongly
that we didn't want to adopt another cat and then move it
cross-country while it was still adapting to a new living environment.

So.... we got to California and settled into a small home. Without
getting into the indoor/outdoor cat debate - let me briefly say that
Callie started out as an indoor cat, graduated to the harness, and
then supervised time out with me in an urban yard. She was not,
obviously, permitted outside unsupervised in urban Chicago. She has
always had a real interest and need to be outside on whatever terms
she could get and so we tried to accomodate her as safety allowed. And
she has always been smart and capable in surmounting the challenges of
outside and believe me, I spent ALOT of time out there with her.

Here in California, we have a cavernous yard, and a block filled with
indoor/outdoor cats and Callie has been in hog heaven spending her
days outside, mostly in our and few neighboring yards. She never
seemed to get in any trouble, appear scared in any way, came in every
evening right on time and always responded promptly to her name being
called.

Probably we should have left well enough alone, but we still thought a
2nd cat would fit in well, as she has always been sociable in the
extreme with other cats. We went several times to the local shelters,
and concluded that although a male kitten would probably have been the
easiest match, that we prefer female cats (partially for roaming
reasons) and that we had limited time to socialize and supervise a new
kitten. (And having engaged in a protracted effort in raising Callie,
I do know that it takes time to do it right). We settled on a very
timid, shy Tuxedo female about Callie's age. Our thinking was that a
timid cat would be far less likely to try to dominate Callie and that
it would be easy for her to set up the terms of their new relationship
and we felt strongly that our 1st cat deserved to have her needs come
first in her home. We also thought Flower, underneath the extreme
fear, seemed enormously sweet.

It's been five weeks and despite an extensive introduction process,
their relationship has gone from bad to worse. Flower spends virtually
all of her time under the bed, sneaking out only when the coast is
clear, and immediately retreating if she comes across any living
creature. The only person in the house she has bonded with at all is
me, who she will sometimes allow to be in the same room as her if I
don't move too much. Once or twice, after a protracted half an hour
approach, she let me pet her. She does eat and use the box, but they
have to be within 12" of the bed.

In the meantime, Callie, who will chase her under the bed if she sees
her, has started spending her entire days in the yard, refuses to use
her cat tree, and howls half the night to be let outside. She seems to
feel the house is contaminated by the other cat, and while she is
still enormously affectionate with us, she doesn't want to be inside
the house anymore. When she has to be inside, she selects a defensive
position in the study, a tiny room farthest from the bedroom and stays
there - on alert - all night long - ignoring her cat tree, our bedroom
and all the rest of her formerly favorite places. We feel terrible for
both of them.

On Friday morning, sick of tired of living in an armed war zone for
over a month, I found Flower siting, miraculously, on top of the bed,
in the locked bedroom.
I went and got Callie and showed her Flower on the bed, while holding
her gently and giving her treats and kisses. She groaned terribly and
ran back to her safe place crying. I immediately went to her and tried
to reassure her who basically attached herself like a burr to my
chest, which is enormously uncharacteristic .Despairing, I took her
out into the yard and hung out with her all morning, where she was
happy and playful. When I had to go out for a while, she began
following me and I picked her up and returned her to the yard. The
third time,
I thought seriously about locking her up, but thought that would only
make her more unhappy and she was generally calmer and happier in the
yard. Big mistake.

Callie was gone for thirty hours, thirty of the worse hours of my
life, and returned very late Saturday night limping and with a wound
on her leg.
My theory is that, she again tried to follow me, hiding under cars so
I wouldn't see her (and I looked back extensively, but she can hide
well) and was probably clipped by a car. The wound - which is healable
- was scabbed when she returned, so I expect she hid for the night and
next day and limped home when it was dark again. In other words - I
almost lost her, if not for luck and her own bright, brave and savvy
self.

So I'm horrified and torn. I feel like I am endangering Callie's life
by the emotional distress this adoption is putting her through. She's
never done anything remotely like this and I don't know what will
happen next. She's recuperating inside, but both are locked up and
separated and Callie will only occupy this one room, although she's
ill and should be on the bed with me in premium comfort. With only
three legs working, she's still agitating to go outside (which ain't
gonna happen for a while). Meanwhile, the new cat is confined to the
bedroom again, with a little underbed universe, and while I can see
she is slowly starting to trust me a little and come out of her shell,
she's a long way from mere freedom of motion in a house with two
adults and another cat. (She won't come out from under the bed if my
husband enters the bedroom or bathroom, if I move quickly or towards
her, or if she hears Callie in the house). She's under there a minimum
of 20 of every 24 hours, and has been since she arrived.

Help! I feel like this is beginning to spiral out of control. My
husband thinks Flower has to be returned to the no-kill shelter, but I
look in those little eyes
(as I'm the only one who see them), and it's so hard for me to betray
that granule of growing trust. I don't see how we can find an
alternate home for a cat who's under the bed 20 hours a day. But he's
right. We can't put Callie's happiness at risk indefinitely. It's not
fair to take care of this new cat at her expense, especially when the
primary purpose of the new cat was to make her life better, not to
ruin it.

Where can we go from here? I'm lost and not sure I can spend another
month primarily worrying about cats and I'll go out of my mind of
Callie disappears again - as will he.

I never thought I'd ecen be considering returning a cat to a shelter,
but I'm running out of other ideas to salvage this situation.

Any thoughts?

Tracy
  #2  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:59 AM
m. L. Briggs
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 21 Sep 2003 13:01:47 -0700, (Tracy) wrote:

This may be a bit long, but please bear with me : I sorely need some
advice here.

We have two cats, Callie and Flower. Callie is 16 months, Maine Coon
mix and was adopted at 6 months old from the Anti-Cruelty Society in
Chicago. She's a great cat and we adore her. We moved back to Northern
California with her a month ago and decided to act on a long-standing
thought about getting a companion cat for Callie, especially once I
returned to a full-time work schedule. We didn't do so in Chicago, as
I was doing much of my work from home there and we also felt strongly
that we didn't want to adopt another cat and then move it
cross-country while it was still adapting to a new living environment.

So.... we got to California and settled into a small home. Without
getting into the indoor/outdoor cat debate - let me briefly say that
Callie started out as an indoor cat, graduated to the harness, and
then supervised time out with me in an urban yard. She was not,
obviously, permitted outside unsupervised in urban Chicago. She has
always had a real interest and need to be outside on whatever terms
she could get and so we tried to accomodate her as safety allowed. And
she has always been smart and capable in surmounting the challenges of
outside and believe me, I spent ALOT of time out there with her.

Here in California, we have a cavernous yard, and a block filled with
indoor/outdoor cats and Callie has been in hog heaven spending her
days outside, mostly in our and few neighboring yards. She never
seemed to get in any trouble, appear scared in any way, came in every
evening right on time and always responded promptly to her name being
called.

Probably we should have left well enough alone, but we still thought a
2nd cat would fit in well, as she has always been sociable in the
extreme with other cats. We went several times to the local shelters,
and concluded that although a male kitten would probably have been the
easiest match, that we prefer female cats (partially for roaming
reasons) and that we had limited time to socialize and supervise a new
kitten. (And having engaged in a protracted effort in raising Callie,
I do know that it takes time to do it right). We settled on a very
timid, shy Tuxedo female about Callie's age. Our thinking was that a
timid cat would be far less likely to try to dominate Callie and that
it would be easy for her to set up the terms of their new relationship
and we felt strongly that our 1st cat deserved to have her needs come
first in her home. We also thought Flower, underneath the extreme
fear, seemed enormously sweet.

It's been five weeks and despite an extensive introduction process,
their relationship has gone from bad to worse. Flower spends virtually
all of her time under the bed, sneaking out only when the coast is
clear, and immediately retreating if she comes across any living
creature. The only person in the house she has bonded with at all is
me, who she will sometimes allow to be in the same room as her if I
don't move too much. Once or twice, after a protracted half an hour
approach, she let me pet her. She does eat and use the box, but they
have to be within 12" of the bed.

In the meantime, Callie, who will chase her under the bed if she sees
her, has started spending her entire days in the yard, refuses to use
her cat tree, and howls half the night to be let outside. She seems to
feel the house is contaminated by the other cat, and while she is
still enormously affectionate with us, she doesn't want to be inside
the house anymore. When she has to be inside, she selects a defensive
position in the study, a tiny room farthest from the bedroom and stays
there - on alert - all night long - ignoring her cat tree, our bedroom
and all the rest of her formerly favorite places. We feel terrible for
both of them.

On Friday morning, sick of tired of living in an armed war zone for
over a month, I found Flower siting, miraculously, on top of the bed,
in the locked bedroom.
I went and got Callie and showed her Flower on the bed, while holding
her gently and giving her treats and kisses. She groaned terribly and
ran back to her safe place crying. I immediately went to her and tried
to reassure her who basically attached herself like a burr to my
chest, which is enormously uncharacteristic .Despairing, I took her
out into the yard and hung out with her all morning, where she was
happy and playful. When I had to go out for a while, she began
following me and I picked her up and returned her to the yard. The
third time,
I thought seriously about locking her up, but thought that would only
make her more unhappy and she was generally calmer and happier in the
yard. Big mistake.

Callie was gone for thirty hours, thirty of the worse hours of my
life, and returned very late Saturday night limping and with a wound
on her leg.
My theory is that, she again tried to follow me, hiding under cars so
I wouldn't see her (and I looked back extensively, but she can hide
well) and was probably clipped by a car. The wound - which is healable
- was scabbed when she returned, so I expect she hid for the night and
next day and limped home when it was dark again. In other words - I
almost lost her, if not for luck and her own bright, brave and savvy
self.

So I'm horrified and torn. I feel like I am endangering Callie's life
by the emotional distress this adoption is putting her through. She's
never done anything remotely like this and I don't know what will
happen next. She's recuperating inside, but both are locked up and
separated and Callie will only occupy this one room, although she's
ill and should be on the bed with me in premium comfort. With only
three legs working, she's still agitating to go outside (which ain't
gonna happen for a while). Meanwhile, the new cat is confined to the
bedroom again, with a little underbed universe, and while I can see
she is slowly starting to trust me a little and come out of her shell,
she's a long way from mere freedom of motion in a house with two
adults and another cat. (She won't come out from under the bed if my
husband enters the bedroom or bathroom, if I move quickly or towards
her, or if she hears Callie in the house). She's under there a minimum
of 20 of every 24 hours, and has been since she arrived.

Help! I feel like this is beginning to spiral out of control. My
husband thinks Flower has to be returned to the no-kill shelter, but I
look in those little eyes
(as I'm the only one who see them), and it's so hard for me to betray
that granule of growing trust. I don't see how we can find an
alternate home for a cat who's under the bed 20 hours a day. But he's
right. We can't put Callie's happiness at risk indefinitely. It's not
fair to take care of this new cat at her expense, especially when the
primary purpose of the new cat was to make her life better, not to
ruin it.

Where can we go from here? I'm lost and not sure I can spend another
month primarily worrying about cats and I'll go out of my mind of
Callie disappears again - as will he.

I never thought I'd ecen be considering returning a cat to a shelter,
but I'm running out of other ideas to salvage this situation.

Any thoughts?

Tracy


some cats prefer being "only cats" and I think you have got two of
them. Perhaps you can find someone who wants an only cat -- I am sure
she would adjust. Best of luck.
  #3  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:59 AM
m. L. Briggs
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 21 Sep 2003 13:01:47 -0700, (Tracy) wrote:

This may be a bit long, but please bear with me : I sorely need some
advice here.

We have two cats, Callie and Flower. Callie is 16 months, Maine Coon
mix and was adopted at 6 months old from the Anti-Cruelty Society in
Chicago. She's a great cat and we adore her. We moved back to Northern
California with her a month ago and decided to act on a long-standing
thought about getting a companion cat for Callie, especially once I
returned to a full-time work schedule. We didn't do so in Chicago, as
I was doing much of my work from home there and we also felt strongly
that we didn't want to adopt another cat and then move it
cross-country while it was still adapting to a new living environment.

So.... we got to California and settled into a small home. Without
getting into the indoor/outdoor cat debate - let me briefly say that
Callie started out as an indoor cat, graduated to the harness, and
then supervised time out with me in an urban yard. She was not,
obviously, permitted outside unsupervised in urban Chicago. She has
always had a real interest and need to be outside on whatever terms
she could get and so we tried to accomodate her as safety allowed. And
she has always been smart and capable in surmounting the challenges of
outside and believe me, I spent ALOT of time out there with her.

Here in California, we have a cavernous yard, and a block filled with
indoor/outdoor cats and Callie has been in hog heaven spending her
days outside, mostly in our and few neighboring yards. She never
seemed to get in any trouble, appear scared in any way, came in every
evening right on time and always responded promptly to her name being
called.

Probably we should have left well enough alone, but we still thought a
2nd cat would fit in well, as she has always been sociable in the
extreme with other cats. We went several times to the local shelters,
and concluded that although a male kitten would probably have been the
easiest match, that we prefer female cats (partially for roaming
reasons) and that we had limited time to socialize and supervise a new
kitten. (And having engaged in a protracted effort in raising Callie,
I do know that it takes time to do it right). We settled on a very
timid, shy Tuxedo female about Callie's age. Our thinking was that a
timid cat would be far less likely to try to dominate Callie and that
it would be easy for her to set up the terms of their new relationship
and we felt strongly that our 1st cat deserved to have her needs come
first in her home. We also thought Flower, underneath the extreme
fear, seemed enormously sweet.

It's been five weeks and despite an extensive introduction process,
their relationship has gone from bad to worse. Flower spends virtually
all of her time under the bed, sneaking out only when the coast is
clear, and immediately retreating if she comes across any living
creature. The only person in the house she has bonded with at all is
me, who she will sometimes allow to be in the same room as her if I
don't move too much. Once or twice, after a protracted half an hour
approach, she let me pet her. She does eat and use the box, but they
have to be within 12" of the bed.

In the meantime, Callie, who will chase her under the bed if she sees
her, has started spending her entire days in the yard, refuses to use
her cat tree, and howls half the night to be let outside. She seems to
feel the house is contaminated by the other cat, and while she is
still enormously affectionate with us, she doesn't want to be inside
the house anymore. When she has to be inside, she selects a defensive
position in the study, a tiny room farthest from the bedroom and stays
there - on alert - all night long - ignoring her cat tree, our bedroom
and all the rest of her formerly favorite places. We feel terrible for
both of them.

On Friday morning, sick of tired of living in an armed war zone for
over a month, I found Flower siting, miraculously, on top of the bed,
in the locked bedroom.
I went and got Callie and showed her Flower on the bed, while holding
her gently and giving her treats and kisses. She groaned terribly and
ran back to her safe place crying. I immediately went to her and tried
to reassure her who basically attached herself like a burr to my
chest, which is enormously uncharacteristic .Despairing, I took her
out into the yard and hung out with her all morning, where she was
happy and playful. When I had to go out for a while, she began
following me and I picked her up and returned her to the yard. The
third time,
I thought seriously about locking her up, but thought that would only
make her more unhappy and she was generally calmer and happier in the
yard. Big mistake.

Callie was gone for thirty hours, thirty of the worse hours of my
life, and returned very late Saturday night limping and with a wound
on her leg.
My theory is that, she again tried to follow me, hiding under cars so
I wouldn't see her (and I looked back extensively, but she can hide
well) and was probably clipped by a car. The wound - which is healable
- was scabbed when she returned, so I expect she hid for the night and
next day and limped home when it was dark again. In other words - I
almost lost her, if not for luck and her own bright, brave and savvy
self.

So I'm horrified and torn. I feel like I am endangering Callie's life
by the emotional distress this adoption is putting her through. She's
never done anything remotely like this and I don't know what will
happen next. She's recuperating inside, but both are locked up and
separated and Callie will only occupy this one room, although she's
ill and should be on the bed with me in premium comfort. With only
three legs working, she's still agitating to go outside (which ain't
gonna happen for a while). Meanwhile, the new cat is confined to the
bedroom again, with a little underbed universe, and while I can see
she is slowly starting to trust me a little and come out of her shell,
she's a long way from mere freedom of motion in a house with two
adults and another cat. (She won't come out from under the bed if my
husband enters the bedroom or bathroom, if I move quickly or towards
her, or if she hears Callie in the house). She's under there a minimum
of 20 of every 24 hours, and has been since she arrived.

Help! I feel like this is beginning to spiral out of control. My
husband thinks Flower has to be returned to the no-kill shelter, but I
look in those little eyes
(as I'm the only one who see them), and it's so hard for me to betray
that granule of growing trust. I don't see how we can find an
alternate home for a cat who's under the bed 20 hours a day. But he's
right. We can't put Callie's happiness at risk indefinitely. It's not
fair to take care of this new cat at her expense, especially when the
primary purpose of the new cat was to make her life better, not to
ruin it.

Where can we go from here? I'm lost and not sure I can spend another
month primarily worrying about cats and I'll go out of my mind of
Callie disappears again - as will he.

I never thought I'd ecen be considering returning a cat to a shelter,
but I'm running out of other ideas to salvage this situation.

Any thoughts?

Tracy


some cats prefer being "only cats" and I think you have got two of
them. Perhaps you can find someone who wants an only cat -- I am sure
she would adjust. Best of luck.
  #4  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:59 AM
m. L. Briggs
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On 21 Sep 2003 13:01:47 -0700, (Tracy) wrote:

This may be a bit long, but please bear with me : I sorely need some
advice here.

We have two cats, Callie and Flower. Callie is 16 months, Maine Coon
mix and was adopted at 6 months old from the Anti-Cruelty Society in
Chicago. She's a great cat and we adore her. We moved back to Northern
California with her a month ago and decided to act on a long-standing
thought about getting a companion cat for Callie, especially once I
returned to a full-time work schedule. We didn't do so in Chicago, as
I was doing much of my work from home there and we also felt strongly
that we didn't want to adopt another cat and then move it
cross-country while it was still adapting to a new living environment.

So.... we got to California and settled into a small home. Without
getting into the indoor/outdoor cat debate - let me briefly say that
Callie started out as an indoor cat, graduated to the harness, and
then supervised time out with me in an urban yard. She was not,
obviously, permitted outside unsupervised in urban Chicago. She has
always had a real interest and need to be outside on whatever terms
she could get and so we tried to accomodate her as safety allowed. And
she has always been smart and capable in surmounting the challenges of
outside and believe me, I spent ALOT of time out there with her.

Here in California, we have a cavernous yard, and a block filled with
indoor/outdoor cats and Callie has been in hog heaven spending her
days outside, mostly in our and few neighboring yards. She never
seemed to get in any trouble, appear scared in any way, came in every
evening right on time and always responded promptly to her name being
called.

Probably we should have left well enough alone, but we still thought a
2nd cat would fit in well, as she has always been sociable in the
extreme with other cats. We went several times to the local shelters,
and concluded that although a male kitten would probably have been the
easiest match, that we prefer female cats (partially for roaming
reasons) and that we had limited time to socialize and supervise a new
kitten. (And having engaged in a protracted effort in raising Callie,
I do know that it takes time to do it right). We settled on a very
timid, shy Tuxedo female about Callie's age. Our thinking was that a
timid cat would be far less likely to try to dominate Callie and that
it would be easy for her to set up the terms of their new relationship
and we felt strongly that our 1st cat deserved to have her needs come
first in her home. We also thought Flower, underneath the extreme
fear, seemed enormously sweet.

It's been five weeks and despite an extensive introduction process,
their relationship has gone from bad to worse. Flower spends virtually
all of her time under the bed, sneaking out only when the coast is
clear, and immediately retreating if she comes across any living
creature. The only person in the house she has bonded with at all is
me, who she will sometimes allow to be in the same room as her if I
don't move too much. Once or twice, after a protracted half an hour
approach, she let me pet her. She does eat and use the box, but they
have to be within 12" of the bed.

In the meantime, Callie, who will chase her under the bed if she sees
her, has started spending her entire days in the yard, refuses to use
her cat tree, and howls half the night to be let outside. She seems to
feel the house is contaminated by the other cat, and while she is
still enormously affectionate with us, she doesn't want to be inside
the house anymore. When she has to be inside, she selects a defensive
position in the study, a tiny room farthest from the bedroom and stays
there - on alert - all night long - ignoring her cat tree, our bedroom
and all the rest of her formerly favorite places. We feel terrible for
both of them.

On Friday morning, sick of tired of living in an armed war zone for
over a month, I found Flower siting, miraculously, on top of the bed,
in the locked bedroom.
I went and got Callie and showed her Flower on the bed, while holding
her gently and giving her treats and kisses. She groaned terribly and
ran back to her safe place crying. I immediately went to her and tried
to reassure her who basically attached herself like a burr to my
chest, which is enormously uncharacteristic .Despairing, I took her
out into the yard and hung out with her all morning, where she was
happy and playful. When I had to go out for a while, she began
following me and I picked her up and returned her to the yard. The
third time,
I thought seriously about locking her up, but thought that would only
make her more unhappy and she was generally calmer and happier in the
yard. Big mistake.

Callie was gone for thirty hours, thirty of the worse hours of my
life, and returned very late Saturday night limping and with a wound
on her leg.
My theory is that, she again tried to follow me, hiding under cars so
I wouldn't see her (and I looked back extensively, but she can hide
well) and was probably clipped by a car. The wound - which is healable
- was scabbed when she returned, so I expect she hid for the night and
next day and limped home when it was dark again. In other words - I
almost lost her, if not for luck and her own bright, brave and savvy
self.

So I'm horrified and torn. I feel like I am endangering Callie's life
by the emotional distress this adoption is putting her through. She's
never done anything remotely like this and I don't know what will
happen next. She's recuperating inside, but both are locked up and
separated and Callie will only occupy this one room, although she's
ill and should be on the bed with me in premium comfort. With only
three legs working, she's still agitating to go outside (which ain't
gonna happen for a while). Meanwhile, the new cat is confined to the
bedroom again, with a little underbed universe, and while I can see
she is slowly starting to trust me a little and come out of her shell,
she's a long way from mere freedom of motion in a house with two
adults and another cat. (She won't come out from under the bed if my
husband enters the bedroom or bathroom, if I move quickly or towards
her, or if she hears Callie in the house). She's under there a minimum
of 20 of every 24 hours, and has been since she arrived.

Help! I feel like this is beginning to spiral out of control. My
husband thinks Flower has to be returned to the no-kill shelter, but I
look in those little eyes
(as I'm the only one who see them), and it's so hard for me to betray
that granule of growing trust. I don't see how we can find an
alternate home for a cat who's under the bed 20 hours a day. But he's
right. We can't put Callie's happiness at risk indefinitely. It's not
fair to take care of this new cat at her expense, especially when the
primary purpose of the new cat was to make her life better, not to
ruin it.

Where can we go from here? I'm lost and not sure I can spend another
month primarily worrying about cats and I'll go out of my mind of
Callie disappears again - as will he.

I never thought I'd ecen be considering returning a cat to a shelter,
but I'm running out of other ideas to salvage this situation.

Any thoughts?

Tracy


some cats prefer being "only cats" and I think you have got two of
them. Perhaps you can find someone who wants an only cat -- I am sure
she would adjust. Best of luck.
  #5  
Old September 22nd 03, 03:54 AM
fuga =^o^=
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


  #6  
Old September 22nd 03, 03:54 AM
fuga =^o^=
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
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Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


  #7  
Old September 22nd 03, 03:54 AM
fuga =^o^=
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Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


  #8  
Old September 22nd 03, 08:21 AM
Tracy
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"fuga =^o^=" wrote in message le.rogers.com...
Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


Oh yes, of course. We went to the emergency clinic the same night she
came home limping. She has a puncture wound on her lower left leg, is
scared and hungry and tired, but the vet saw no additional damage
(besides a bad case of fleas, sigh).

We're watching her closely for any signs of trouble, but so far, she
seems to be improving .....
  #9  
Old September 22nd 03, 08:21 AM
Tracy
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Posts: n/a
Default

"fuga =^o^=" wrote in message le.rogers.com...
Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


Oh yes, of course. We went to the emergency clinic the same night she
came home limping. She has a puncture wound on her lower left leg, is
scared and hungry and tired, but the vet saw no additional damage
(besides a bad case of fleas, sigh).

We're watching her closely for any signs of trouble, but so far, she
seems to be improving .....
  #10  
Old September 22nd 03, 08:21 AM
Tracy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"fuga =^o^=" wrote in message le.rogers.com...
Did you take Callie to the vet since you brought her home to make sure she's
ok?

I am sorry to hear you are having such a hard time getting the cats to
adjust to each other.

Purrs,

fuga


Oh yes, of course. We went to the emergency clinic the same night she
came home limping. She has a puncture wound on her lower left leg, is
scared and hungry and tired, but the vet saw no additional damage
(besides a bad case of fleas, sigh).

We're watching her closely for any signs of trouble, but so far, she
seems to be improving .....
 




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