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Vomiting: only nocturnally



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 21st 03, 11:04 PM
Jay Goldstein
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Posts: n/a
Default Vomiting: only nocturnally

My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.
For the last few weeks he vomits once a day. The vomiting always occurs
somewhere between midnight and 6 a.m. The vomit consists of a small amount
of liquid that looks like the residue of the dry cat food he is fed. On two
occasions there has been a small amount of blood in the vomit.

Here are some facts that may be relevant:

1) He gets his main feeding around 8 a.m. It consists of about 39 g (1.4
oz) of canned food. In addition, we put out a bowl of dry food that is
shared by him and the two other cats in our household. The three cats graze
on the dry food until it is gone (which usually is by 10 p.m.).
2) We took him to the vet and she performed a physical exam, did a blood
work-up, and x-rayed his abdomen. She found nothing abnormal.
3) On the chance that the nocturnal vomiting might be the result excess
stomach acidity, she prescribed an antacid (Sucralfate). He has been on the
antacid for 5 1/2 days. The antacid has had no effect.
4) Other than the nocturnal vomiting, there is no indication of a change in
his behaviour or mood. He has a good appetite, urinates and defecates
regularly, is alert, playful, has a healthy coat, etc., etc.

The vet has mentioned other things she could do, including testing him for
pancreatitis, administering barium and then taking more x-rays, and, as a
last resort, doing exploratory surgery on his abdomen.

If anyone has encountered a similar situation, what was the cause? Any
information will be greatly appreciated.


Jay



  #2  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:29 AM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Try discontinuing the dry food and feed him only canned.
Gail
"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message
...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.
For the last few weeks he vomits once a day. The vomiting always occurs
somewhere between midnight and 6 a.m. The vomit consists of a small

amount
of liquid that looks like the residue of the dry cat food he is fed. On

two
occasions there has been a small amount of blood in the vomit.

Here are some facts that may be relevant:

1) He gets his main feeding around 8 a.m. It consists of about 39 g (1.4
oz) of canned food. In addition, we put out a bowl of dry food that is
shared by him and the two other cats in our household. The three cats

graze
on the dry food until it is gone (which usually is by 10 p.m.).
2) We took him to the vet and she performed a physical exam, did a blood
work-up, and x-rayed his abdomen. She found nothing abnormal.
3) On the chance that the nocturnal vomiting might be the result excess
stomach acidity, she prescribed an antacid (Sucralfate). He has been on

the
antacid for 5 1/2 days. The antacid has had no effect.
4) Other than the nocturnal vomiting, there is no indication of a change

in
his behaviour or mood. He has a good appetite, urinates and defecates
regularly, is alert, playful, has a healthy coat, etc., etc.

The vet has mentioned other things she could do, including testing him for
pancreatitis, administering barium and then taking more x-rays, and, as a
last resort, doing exploratory surgery on his abdomen.

If anyone has encountered a similar situation, what was the cause? Any
information will be greatly appreciated.


Jay





  #3  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:29 AM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Try discontinuing the dry food and feed him only canned.
Gail
"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message
...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.
For the last few weeks he vomits once a day. The vomiting always occurs
somewhere between midnight and 6 a.m. The vomit consists of a small

amount
of liquid that looks like the residue of the dry cat food he is fed. On

two
occasions there has been a small amount of blood in the vomit.

Here are some facts that may be relevant:

1) He gets his main feeding around 8 a.m. It consists of about 39 g (1.4
oz) of canned food. In addition, we put out a bowl of dry food that is
shared by him and the two other cats in our household. The three cats

graze
on the dry food until it is gone (which usually is by 10 p.m.).
2) We took him to the vet and she performed a physical exam, did a blood
work-up, and x-rayed his abdomen. She found nothing abnormal.
3) On the chance that the nocturnal vomiting might be the result excess
stomach acidity, she prescribed an antacid (Sucralfate). He has been on

the
antacid for 5 1/2 days. The antacid has had no effect.
4) Other than the nocturnal vomiting, there is no indication of a change

in
his behaviour or mood. He has a good appetite, urinates and defecates
regularly, is alert, playful, has a healthy coat, etc., etc.

The vet has mentioned other things she could do, including testing him for
pancreatitis, administering barium and then taking more x-rays, and, as a
last resort, doing exploratory surgery on his abdomen.

If anyone has encountered a similar situation, what was the cause? Any
information will be greatly appreciated.


Jay





  #4  
Old September 22nd 03, 12:29 AM
Gail
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Try discontinuing the dry food and feed him only canned.
Gail
"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message
...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.
For the last few weeks he vomits once a day. The vomiting always occurs
somewhere between midnight and 6 a.m. The vomit consists of a small

amount
of liquid that looks like the residue of the dry cat food he is fed. On

two
occasions there has been a small amount of blood in the vomit.

Here are some facts that may be relevant:

1) He gets his main feeding around 8 a.m. It consists of about 39 g (1.4
oz) of canned food. In addition, we put out a bowl of dry food that is
shared by him and the two other cats in our household. The three cats

graze
on the dry food until it is gone (which usually is by 10 p.m.).
2) We took him to the vet and she performed a physical exam, did a blood
work-up, and x-rayed his abdomen. She found nothing abnormal.
3) On the chance that the nocturnal vomiting might be the result excess
stomach acidity, she prescribed an antacid (Sucralfate). He has been on

the
antacid for 5 1/2 days. The antacid has had no effect.
4) Other than the nocturnal vomiting, there is no indication of a change

in
his behaviour or mood. He has a good appetite, urinates and defecates
regularly, is alert, playful, has a healthy coat, etc., etc.

The vet has mentioned other things she could do, including testing him for
pancreatitis, administering barium and then taking more x-rays, and, as a
last resort, doing exploratory surgery on his abdomen.

If anyone has encountered a similar situation, what was the cause? Any
information will be greatly appreciated.


Jay





  #5  
Old September 22nd 03, 05:32 AM
-L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message ...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.


Hi,

Strangely enough, vomiting at night was the first sign that we had a
problem with Peewee (my 12 year-old) - first it was food residue and
bile, then the same with a little bit of fur - then a furball, then
bloody bile - and he was SICK (also diarrhea). After a week of
observation and treatment with antacids and fluids, the major problem
seems to have been a giant furball(s) - which he passed over the
period of a week. If you want the details, search for this ng for
"Peewee" and you will find my chronicled posts. I consulted a feline
specialist who recommended exploratory surgery combined with biopsy -
her assessment was this: "Why spend $300+ on X-ray and a barium
series when you will probably end up going to surgery anyway? I tend
to agree. I opted to wait it out, change his diet, keep fluids and
antacids down him, and give him LOTS of attention - and for me, it
paid off because he passed the blockage.
Also note that just prior to this, the cat seemed fine - ate well, and
was pottying regularly.

Anyway, best of luck - it might be in your best interest to change
diet first - go to a canned food (Peewee was prescribed the Purina
diabetic diet as it is easy to digest and high in protein - A/D is too
rich) before resorting to more drastic measures. I would also force
fluids and/or have the vet give kitty Sub-q fluids.

Hope he feels better soon,

-L.
  #6  
Old September 22nd 03, 05:32 AM
-L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message ...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.


Hi,

Strangely enough, vomiting at night was the first sign that we had a
problem with Peewee (my 12 year-old) - first it was food residue and
bile, then the same with a little bit of fur - then a furball, then
bloody bile - and he was SICK (also diarrhea). After a week of
observation and treatment with antacids and fluids, the major problem
seems to have been a giant furball(s) - which he passed over the
period of a week. If you want the details, search for this ng for
"Peewee" and you will find my chronicled posts. I consulted a feline
specialist who recommended exploratory surgery combined with biopsy -
her assessment was this: "Why spend $300+ on X-ray and a barium
series when you will probably end up going to surgery anyway? I tend
to agree. I opted to wait it out, change his diet, keep fluids and
antacids down him, and give him LOTS of attention - and for me, it
paid off because he passed the blockage.
Also note that just prior to this, the cat seemed fine - ate well, and
was pottying regularly.

Anyway, best of luck - it might be in your best interest to change
diet first - go to a canned food (Peewee was prescribed the Purina
diabetic diet as it is easy to digest and high in protein - A/D is too
rich) before resorting to more drastic measures. I would also force
fluids and/or have the vet give kitty Sub-q fluids.

Hope he feels better soon,

-L.
  #7  
Old September 22nd 03, 05:32 AM
-L.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Jay Goldstein" wrote in message ...
My 12 year old male tabby is exhibiting behaviour that has my vet stumped.


Hi,

Strangely enough, vomiting at night was the first sign that we had a
problem with Peewee (my 12 year-old) - first it was food residue and
bile, then the same with a little bit of fur - then a furball, then
bloody bile - and he was SICK (also diarrhea). After a week of
observation and treatment with antacids and fluids, the major problem
seems to have been a giant furball(s) - which he passed over the
period of a week. If you want the details, search for this ng for
"Peewee" and you will find my chronicled posts. I consulted a feline
specialist who recommended exploratory surgery combined with biopsy -
her assessment was this: "Why spend $300+ on X-ray and a barium
series when you will probably end up going to surgery anyway? I tend
to agree. I opted to wait it out, change his diet, keep fluids and
antacids down him, and give him LOTS of attention - and for me, it
paid off because he passed the blockage.
Also note that just prior to this, the cat seemed fine - ate well, and
was pottying regularly.

Anyway, best of luck - it might be in your best interest to change
diet first - go to a canned food (Peewee was prescribed the Purina
diabetic diet as it is easy to digest and high in protein - A/D is too
rich) before resorting to more drastic measures. I would also force
fluids and/or have the vet give kitty Sub-q fluids.

Hope he feels better soon,

-L.
 




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