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protect persian rug, declaw not an option



 
 
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  #1  
Old September 23rd 03, 03:52 PM
Elijah
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Posts: n/a
Default protect persian rug, declaw not an option

Hiya.
Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?
Thanks
  #5  
Old September 23rd 03, 04:44 PM
Bill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________
See my cats:
http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm


The Turbo Scratcher is especially attractive to kittens because it has a
ball they can bat around as well as the cardboard to scratch on. It would
probably work better to place it relatively near the rug you don't want
scratched so it will always be a more attractive alternative.

You can also buy an inexpensive scissors-like tool at the pet supply store
to trim the cat's claws. Have someone show you how to do it because you can
injure the cat if you trim too much. There's a blood vessel in the claw you
might hit. It's only necessary to snip the end of the claw to blunt the
sharp point.

Bill



  #6  
Old September 23rd 03, 04:44 PM
Bill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________
See my cats:
http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm


The Turbo Scratcher is especially attractive to kittens because it has a
ball they can bat around as well as the cardboard to scratch on. It would
probably work better to place it relatively near the rug you don't want
scratched so it will always be a more attractive alternative.

You can also buy an inexpensive scissors-like tool at the pet supply store
to trim the cat's claws. Have someone show you how to do it because you can
injure the cat if you trim too much. There's a blood vessel in the claw you
might hit. It's only necessary to snip the end of the claw to blunt the
sharp point.

Bill



  #7  
Old September 23rd 03, 04:44 PM
Bill
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________
See my cats:
http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe
Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html
http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html
Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm


The Turbo Scratcher is especially attractive to kittens because it has a
ball they can bat around as well as the cardboard to scratch on. It would
probably work better to place it relatively near the rug you don't want
scratched so it will always be a more attractive alternative.

You can also buy an inexpensive scissors-like tool at the pet supply store
to trim the cat's claws. Have someone show you how to do it because you can
injure the cat if you trim too much. There's a blood vessel in the claw you
might hit. It's only necessary to snip the end of the claw to blunt the
sharp point.

Bill



  #8  
Old September 23rd 03, 05:12 PM
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________


In addition to what Lauren has said, I would recommend that you get several
types of scratching posts. It is good to have several so that one will be
available close to wherever the cat is. Also try different covers. Most
cats seem to like sisal-wrapped posts, but some prefer carpet or even
cardboard. Some cats prefer horizontal posts, but mine have always like
vertical posts best. As Lauren said, get a tall post to encourage
stretching; and make sure it is heavy and sturdy so it won't topple when the
cat is using it. If the post falls over on the cat, your cat may be too
frightened to use it again. PetSmart has a very nice tall post with a base
that the cat stands on when scratching. That adds still more stability.
You can see some of my cats' posts (and also their cat tree, which includes
one sisal-wrapped pole and 3 carpeted poles) if you will scroll through
their pictures on the sites below my signature.

Since this is a kitten, I do think it would be a good idea to train her to a
scratching post before you put the new rug on the floor. However, that
should be easy if you are consistent. All of my cats were trained within a
few days, but I did monitor them closely during those first few days. If
they would start to scratch elsewhere, I would say "no" and either take the
cat to a scratching post or tap or scratch on the post myself. Any time the
cat used a scratching post, I would praise extravagantly. I would
frequently take time to attract a new cat to a scratching post. I would
drag a piece of cord (sometimes with a toy on the end) up the post while the
cat would grab for it. Invariably, this would lead to the cat grabbing the
post itself and then would usually start to scratch ... which would lead to
more praise, etc.

As I said, it takes only a few days to train a cat to a post (although it
may take more time with a kitten -- just as you can't expect the same
reaction from small children as you would expect from an older child). None
of my furniture is scratched!

MaryL
(take out the litter to reply)

Photos of Duffy and Holly (pictorial history of my blind cat Duffy's
integration into our household):
Duffy, Part I: The Introduction --
http://tinyurl.com/8y54
Duffy, Part II: Life at Home -- http://tinyurl.com/8y56



  #9  
Old September 23rd 03, 05:12 PM
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________


In addition to what Lauren has said, I would recommend that you get several
types of scratching posts. It is good to have several so that one will be
available close to wherever the cat is. Also try different covers. Most
cats seem to like sisal-wrapped posts, but some prefer carpet or even
cardboard. Some cats prefer horizontal posts, but mine have always like
vertical posts best. As Lauren said, get a tall post to encourage
stretching; and make sure it is heavy and sturdy so it won't topple when the
cat is using it. If the post falls over on the cat, your cat may be too
frightened to use it again. PetSmart has a very nice tall post with a base
that the cat stands on when scratching. That adds still more stability.
You can see some of my cats' posts (and also their cat tree, which includes
one sisal-wrapped pole and 3 carpeted poles) if you will scroll through
their pictures on the sites below my signature.

Since this is a kitten, I do think it would be a good idea to train her to a
scratching post before you put the new rug on the floor. However, that
should be easy if you are consistent. All of my cats were trained within a
few days, but I did monitor them closely during those first few days. If
they would start to scratch elsewhere, I would say "no" and either take the
cat to a scratching post or tap or scratch on the post myself. Any time the
cat used a scratching post, I would praise extravagantly. I would
frequently take time to attract a new cat to a scratching post. I would
drag a piece of cord (sometimes with a toy on the end) up the post while the
cat would grab for it. Invariably, this would lead to the cat grabbing the
post itself and then would usually start to scratch ... which would lead to
more praise, etc.

As I said, it takes only a few days to train a cat to a post (although it
may take more time with a kitten -- just as you can't expect the same
reaction from small children as you would expect from an older child). None
of my furniture is scratched!

MaryL
(take out the litter to reply)

Photos of Duffy and Holly (pictorial history of my blind cat Duffy's
integration into our household):
Duffy, Part I: The Introduction --
http://tinyurl.com/8y54
Duffy, Part II: Life at Home -- http://tinyurl.com/8y56



  #10  
Old September 23rd 03, 05:12 PM
MaryL
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"PawsForThought" wrote in message
...
From: (Elijah)


Have a supremely annoying and occasionally affectionate 9-month old
kitten and an older and loving tuxedo cat. Was just given a
magnificent persian rug but it'd be a shame if the kitten tore it to
shreds and there's no way I'll declaw them. Is there any kind of
effective deterrant? I was thinking of waiting a few months until the
kitten isn't so destructive anymore, but that isnt 100% effective,
cause she'll still probably occasionally scratch it like when she's
bored, stretching or deliberately misbehaving. Any advice?


I would highly recommend a good tall sturdy scratching post, one of those
cardboard scratching pads, and a cat tree. I have these for my cats and

they
do not scratch my rugs. The key is to give the cat something more

enticing
than your rug to scratch on. Glad to hear you won't consider declawing!

Lauren
________


In addition to what Lauren has said, I would recommend that you get several
types of scratching posts. It is good to have several so that one will be
available close to wherever the cat is. Also try different covers. Most
cats seem to like sisal-wrapped posts, but some prefer carpet or even
cardboard. Some cats prefer horizontal posts, but mine have always like
vertical posts best. As Lauren said, get a tall post to encourage
stretching; and make sure it is heavy and sturdy so it won't topple when the
cat is using it. If the post falls over on the cat, your cat may be too
frightened to use it again. PetSmart has a very nice tall post with a base
that the cat stands on when scratching. That adds still more stability.
You can see some of my cats' posts (and also their cat tree, which includes
one sisal-wrapped pole and 3 carpeted poles) if you will scroll through
their pictures on the sites below my signature.

Since this is a kitten, I do think it would be a good idea to train her to a
scratching post before you put the new rug on the floor. However, that
should be easy if you are consistent. All of my cats were trained within a
few days, but I did monitor them closely during those first few days. If
they would start to scratch elsewhere, I would say "no" and either take the
cat to a scratching post or tap or scratch on the post myself. Any time the
cat used a scratching post, I would praise extravagantly. I would
frequently take time to attract a new cat to a scratching post. I would
drag a piece of cord (sometimes with a toy on the end) up the post while the
cat would grab for it. Invariably, this would lead to the cat grabbing the
post itself and then would usually start to scratch ... which would lead to
more praise, etc.

As I said, it takes only a few days to train a cat to a post (although it
may take more time with a kitten -- just as you can't expect the same
reaction from small children as you would expect from an older child). None
of my furniture is scratched!

MaryL
(take out the litter to reply)

Photos of Duffy and Holly (pictorial history of my blind cat Duffy's
integration into our household):
Duffy, Part I: The Introduction --
http://tinyurl.com/8y54
Duffy, Part II: Life at Home -- http://tinyurl.com/8y56



 




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