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Damn, Nipsy killed a bird



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 27th 04, 12:41 AM
dgk
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Default Damn, Nipsy killed a bird

I let the boys out into the backyard after getting home. A couple of
minutes later Nipsy comes running in with a bird in his mouth. A
little sparrow. I never thought he could actually catch one. It wasn't
even dead when I saw that he had it but it wasn't going to be getting
better. Then he finished it off.

Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.

Espy appears to be jealous.

-----------------------

Jackie (the new sick girl) is still too sick to be out much but she
seems to be putting on some weight. I can't feel quite EVERY bump in
her spine. The vet said that after another week or so we'll try for
some more blood for further testing.

I finally found out what he was talking about when he said that he
couldn't get blood out of her. I had some trouble getting her to eat
the antibiotic and tried to hold her while putting the dropper into
her mouth. Wow, did she put up a fight! Nothing was going down that
throat. A little while later she ate it all with her food.


Dave
  #2  
Old May 27th 04, 01:38 AM
RobZip
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Default


"dgk" wrote in message
...
Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.


This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


  #3  
Old May 27th 04, 01:38 AM
RobZip
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"dgk" wrote in message
...
Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.


This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


  #4  
Old May 27th 04, 08:37 AM
Tracy
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Default

"RobZip" wrote in message ...

This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


I think the old sage advice is a little overdone. I have two
indoor/outdoor cats that have been out every day for well over a year
and between the pair they've killed two sparrows, one mouse, a fair
amount of butterflies and crickets and one gecko (who was clutched
from the jaws of death and re-released outside). That's it.
  #5  
Old May 27th 04, 08:37 AM
Tracy
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Default

"RobZip" wrote in message ...

This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


I think the old sage advice is a little overdone. I have two
indoor/outdoor cats that have been out every day for well over a year
and between the pair they've killed two sparrows, one mouse, a fair
amount of butterflies and crickets and one gecko (who was clutched
from the jaws of death and re-released outside). That's it.
  #6  
Old May 27th 04, 01:17 PM
dgk
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Default

On Thu, 27 May 2004 00:38:53 GMT, "RobZip"
wrote:


"dgk" wrote in message
.. .
Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.


This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


Yes, but it isn't a very big backyard. And they can't get out of it.
Weekdays I let them out when I get home after work and let them stay
out until it starts getting dark. The door is open so they can come in
whenever they feel like it.

When I let them out they rush out the door and usually skid to a halt
on the deck as the birds fly in all directions. I guess one flew a
little slower than normal.

  #7  
Old May 27th 04, 01:17 PM
dgk
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Default

On Thu, 27 May 2004 00:38:53 GMT, "RobZip"
wrote:


"dgk" wrote in message
.. .
Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.


This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab. A surprising
number of cat owners don't think their cat will hunt and kill when outside
and doubt their ability to do so. Cats are very effective predators by
nature. The old sage advice among rehab people here is that even a well fed,
mostly indoor cat will hunt and kill something at least every third time it
is outside. Not to be laying any sort of accusatory trip on you but,
surprise - you got yourself a hunter there!


Yes, but it isn't a very big backyard. And they can't get out of it.
Weekdays I let them out when I get home after work and let them stay
out until it starts getting dark. The door is open so they can come in
whenever they feel like it.

When I let them out they rush out the door and usually skid to a halt
on the deck as the birds fly in all directions. I guess one flew a
little slower than normal.

  #8  
Old May 27th 04, 01:50 PM
RobZip
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Posts: n/a
Default


"Tracy" wrote in message
om...

I think the old sage advice is a little overdone.


Not overdone at all. As in any other situation, your mileage may vary. Some
domesticated cats show almost no interest in hunting although they are the
exception. Others are quite active. I had 2 indoor/outdoor cats when I lived
in Florida that would hunt in the canal behind the house. An average day
would see them return with a few rats or snakes. That's just what they
brought back. And they never missed a chow call either.


  #9  
Old May 27th 04, 01:50 PM
RobZip
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Tracy" wrote in message
om...

I think the old sage advice is a little overdone.


Not overdone at all. As in any other situation, your mileage may vary. Some
domesticated cats show almost no interest in hunting although they are the
exception. Others are quite active. I had 2 indoor/outdoor cats when I lived
in Florida that would hunt in the canal behind the house. An average day
would see them return with a few rats or snakes. That's just what they
brought back. And they never missed a chow call either.


  #10  
Old May 27th 04, 02:54 PM
James Marz
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Default

"RobZip" wrote in message ...
"dgk" wrote in message
...
Ugh. I feel horrible. Sure, birds die all the time but I'm never going
to let the cats out again without making enough noise so that all the
birds get out first.


This is one of the things I encounter doing wildlife rehab.


Have you ever met any racoons with a heroin addiction in wildlife rehab?


James Marz

Born in lust, turn to dust.
Born in sin? come on in! - Stephen King
 




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