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Keeping cat on patio



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 13th 03, 04:56 PM
pcb
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Default Keeping cat on patio

Nightstar wrote:
Hi - I live in a condo with a fenced patio. The fence is approx. 6
ft. tall and made of wood. I want to be able to allow my cat, Pop, to
go outside on the patio but he can climb over the fence. Someone
suggested attaching "chicken wire" to the fence so it extends 8 inches
above the top of the fence. Supposedly when the cat tries to jump to
the top of the fence the flimsy chicken wire will not hold the weight
of the cat and he will not be able to go over the fence. Has anyone
heard of this or tried it? Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!



I've seen several solutions on the internet. I'm waiting for the
builders to come this week and enclose my garden like the one in this
website http://www.mainecoonguild.org.uk/Gar...en_safety.html

Type in cat and fencing in Google and you should get a lot of sites.

pcb

  #4  
Old July 26th 03, 01:10 AM
Mogie
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Default

Keeping a cat indoors or restricting their access outside is not cruel
anymore then restricting a young child's access outside is cruel. Cats and
young children both need to be protected from possible forces that might be
of harm to them. Someone who allows their children to roam freely usually
end up with dead or missing children and have them taken away.

Bob Brenchley. wrote in message
...
On 13 Jul 2003 06:19:46 -0700, (Nightstar)
wrote:

Hi - I live in a condo with a fenced patio. The fence is approx. 6
ft. tall and made of wood. I want to be able to allow my cat, Pop, to
go outside on the patio but he can climb over the fence. Someone
suggested attaching "chicken wire" to the fence so it extends 8 inches
above the top of the fence. Supposedly when the cat tries to jump to
the top of the fence the flimsy chicken wire will not hold the weight
of the cat and he will not be able to go over the fence. Has anyone
heard of this or tried it? Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!


Cats are NOT cage animals. If you live in an area where, for whatever
reason, you feel unable to allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for
at least some time each day (and only you can judge your area) then
don't have a cat. To have a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in
24/7 marks you are being cruel, selfish, or both.

--
Bob.

Cat's motto: No matter what you've done wrong, always try to make it
look like the dog did it.





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  #5  
Old July 26th 03, 02:55 PM
Bob Brenchley.
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Default

On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 17:10:20 -0700, "Mogie"
wrote:


Bob Brenchley. wrote in message
.. .
On 13 Jul 2003 06:19:46 -0700, (Nightstar)
wrote:

Hi - I live in a condo with a fenced patio. The fence is approx. 6
ft. tall and made of wood. I want to be able to allow my cat, Pop, to
go outside on the patio but he can climb over the fence. Someone
suggested attaching "chicken wire" to the fence so it extends 8 inches
above the top of the fence. Supposedly when the cat tries to jump to
the top of the fence the flimsy chicken wire will not hold the weight
of the cat and he will not be able to go over the fence. Has anyone
heard of this or tried it? Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!


Cats are NOT cage animals. If you live in an area where, for whatever
reason, you feel unable to allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for
at least some time each day (and only you can judge your area) then
don't have a cat. To have a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in
24/7 marks you are being cruel, selfish, or both.

Moronic posting style corrected. You have not been charged for this
service but I reserve the right to charge in the future if you make
the same mistake again.

Keeping a cat indoors or restricting their access outside is not cruel
anymore then restricting a young child's access outside is cruel. Cats and
young children both need to be protected from possible forces that might be
of harm to them. Someone who allows their children to roam freely usually
end up with dead or missing children and have them taken away.


If you live in an area where, for whatever reason, you feel unable to
allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for at least some time each
day (and only you can judge your area) then don't have a cat. To have
a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in 24/7 marks you are being
cruel, selfish, or both.

The FACT is that none of the UK's major shelters, nor most of the
smaller ones that for various reasons affiliate with the big boys,
will normally rehome a healthy cat to an indoor only environment. This
has been confirmed on numerous occasions by people who work at the
grass roots level - actually finding homes for cats.

Cats are NOT children an should not be treated as such. But believe
me, if you constantly kept your child indoors only you would be the
one looking at having it taken away.

--
Bob.

Your IQ score is 2 (it takes 3 to grunt).
  #6  
Old July 27th 03, 09:18 PM
bewtifulfreak
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

As I've mentioned on alt.cats, I think it's important to do what you can to
make sure your cat has as much outside access as safely possible (whether in
a run, on a harness, or whatever), and I'd want to give my cats as much
opportunity to roam as possible. But I've had both indoor and outdoor cats,
and I don't think having a cat who's completely indoors is necessarily cruel
or selfish, particularly if the owner does their best to keep the cat
occupied, give it things to climb on, and what have you. Like I said in the
other group, there are a lot of strays in cities, and to say they're better
off on the streets where they could catch anything, get hit by cars, shot,
or whatever else, than indoors well-fed and cared for, with lots of toys and
attention, well, I don't think that's cruel. Yes, cats are generally
outdoor animals. But they've become domesticated, and can't fend for
themselves against certain dangers; even the well-defended tiger is being
threatened by humankind. Yes, you should always do what you can to provide
the opportunity for a cat to roam safely. But safety is the issue first and
foremost, and I think giving a cat a loving home when needed, even in an
area where it would be unsafe to let it roam, is anything but selfish. I
realize how strongly you feel about this, so I'm sure you'll disagree, but
having had cats who ended up with diseases, being shot, bitten, and other
problems, I feel it's just as cruel to let a cat roam in a dangerous area as
it is to keep one indoors that doesn't want to be. And again, to say you
just shouldn't own one in areas like that when there are so many that need
looking after just doesn't seem any less heartless to me. I honestly think
it depends on the personality of the cat, and the individual situation. As
I wrote to someone with the same opinion in alt.cats: "I really do see your
point, and I think it's a good one. I think we both agree that the welfare
and happiness of the cat has to come first. And if your cat is truly
miserable indoors, then it's up to you to find ways to keep him or her
occupied. And ideally, if you live in a area that's unsafe for free
roaming, you'd either do something like the outdoor run, or teach kitty to
walk on a harness and make sure he or she gets plenty of supervised outdoor
time to keep them happy. The thing is, if you truly love your cat, you'll
realize these things and do whatever it takes to see that they stay happy.
If you really are a cruel and unkind person, then nothing you or I say would
convince anyone of anything anyway."

Agreeing to Disagree,
Ann



  #7  
Old July 27th 03, 09:30 PM
bewtifulfreak
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Default

"Bob Brenchley." wrote in message
...

I do not let young kittens roam, but like children they grow and
develop a life of their own. By the time a cat is adult I would
certainly not put any restrictions on its movements, just as I would
not expect to restrict my children now they are grown.


There are some parallels to cat and child rearing, but unlike with grown
children, you can't teach cats street safety or stranger danger, and make
them aware of all the risks of an outdoor life in the city. I get the
impression from your posts that you believe that domestic cats should be
treated relative to their wild cousins, and to some extent, as with the
feeding, I can certainly see your point. But wild cats, unlike their
domestic brethren, generally don't have to face the dangers of a city or
other highly populated area. And it's just not realistic to say people in
those areas shouldn't own cats, because as I said, there are far too many
cats in those areas in need of a good home.

Ann


  #8  
Old July 28th 03, 06:28 PM
Mogie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Restricting outside access is not cruel. When children are outside (young
children) keep an eye on them. Same for cats they need to be protected. Bob
do you let young children roam?

Bob Brenchley. wrote in message
...
On Fri, 25 Jul 2003 17:10:20 -0700, "Mogie"
wrote:


Bob Brenchley. wrote in message
.. .
On 13 Jul 2003 06:19:46 -0700, (Nightstar)
wrote:

Hi - I live in a condo with a fenced patio. The fence is approx. 6
ft. tall and made of wood. I want to be able to allow my cat, Pop, to
go outside on the patio but he can climb over the fence. Someone
suggested attaching "chicken wire" to the fence so it extends 8 inches
above the top of the fence. Supposedly when the cat tries to jump to
the top of the fence the flimsy chicken wire will not hold the weight
of the cat and he will not be able to go over the fence. Has anyone
heard of this or tried it? Does anyone have any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance!

Cats are NOT cage animals. If you live in an area where, for whatever
reason, you feel unable to allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for
at least some time each day (and only you can judge your area) then
don't have a cat. To have a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in
24/7 marks you are being cruel, selfish, or both.

Moronic posting style corrected. You have not been charged for this
service but I reserve the right to charge in the future if you make
the same mistake again.

Keeping a cat indoors or restricting their access outside is not cruel
anymore then restricting a young child's access outside is cruel. Cats

and
young children both need to be protected from possible forces that might

be
of harm to them. Someone who allows their children to roam freely usually
end up with dead or missing children and have them taken away.


If you live in an area where, for whatever reason, you feel unable to
allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for at least some time each
day (and only you can judge your area) then don't have a cat. To have
a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in 24/7 marks you are being
cruel, selfish, or both.

The FACT is that none of the UK's major shelters, nor most of the
smaller ones that for various reasons affiliate with the big boys,
will normally rehome a healthy cat to an indoor only environment. This
has been confirmed on numerous occasions by people who work at the
grass roots level - actually finding homes for cats.

Cats are NOT children an should not be treated as such. But believe
me, if you constantly kept your child indoors only you would be the
one looking at having it taken away.

--
Bob.

Your IQ score is 2 (it takes 3 to grunt).





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  #9  
Old July 29th 03, 06:36 AM
[email protected]
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Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
Bob Brenchley. wrote:

Cats are NOT cage animals. If you live in an area where, for whatever
reason, you feel unable to allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for
at least some time each day (and only you can judge your area) then
don't have a cat. To have a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in
24/7 marks you are being cruel, selfish, or both.


I'm new to rec.pets.cats and a new cat owner. I was surprised by this
vehement claim. Is this just your personal opinion, or are you an expert
such as a vet? What organisations or studies support your claim?

I obtained my two cats from the Cat Protection Society of NSW, who run a
no-kill shelter in Newtown, Sydney. The CPS included with their paperwork
a fact sheet called "Cats Living Indoors" which states, "More and more
people are keeping their cats indoors because they realise that there are
benefits not just for cats and themselves, but also for the environment.
Cats can live indoors very happily but it's vital... to make the cat's
environment as interesting and fun as possible."

The fact sheet goes on to outline outdoor hazards for cats, including
traffic, other animals, disease, parasites, and poisoning. It explains how
to "help your cat become a contented indoor cat" through desexing and
cleanliness and providing a secure place to hide, toys, greens, a play
centre, high spots to sit, and so on. They suggest having two cats to
entertain each other while the owner's at work.

I don't speak for the CPS, but it's obviously their view that not only is
keeping a cat indoors safer, it's certainly not cruel as long as it's done
with appropriate care.

Rather than letting them roam freely, my plan is to take my two boys out
with a harness and leash, so they can have a good sniff round the
backyard; this has worked very well for my brother and sisters' kittens.
Eventually I hope to get the boys a cat enclosure so they can play
unsupervised. I've known too many cats who were allowed to "roam" and
never came home.

Kate Orman http://www.zip.com.au/~korman/
"I have no idea what that meant." - Dot Warner
  #10  
Old July 29th 03, 02:16 PM
L. Kelly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message ...
| In article ,
| Bob Brenchley. wrote:
|
| Cats are NOT cage animals. If you live in an area where, for whatever
| reason, you feel unable to allow a healthy cat its freedom to roam for
| at least some time each day (and only you can judge your area) then
| don't have a cat. To have a healthy cat, knowing you will keep it in
| 24/7 marks you are being cruel, selfish, or both.
|
| I'm new to rec.pets.cats and a new cat owner. I was surprised by this
| vehement claim. Is this just your personal opinion, or are you an expert
| such as a vet? What organisations or studies support your claim?
|
| Kate Orman http://www.zip.com.au/~korman/
| "I have no idea what that meant." - Dot Warner

Hi Kate,

Don't be too surprised or upset by anything that Bob writes. He has been here for years
and has always written the same garbage. He has them saved so he doesn't have to rewrite
his rubbish every time he wants to say the same thing. Killfile him like everyone else
has.

There is nothing at all wrong with keeping cats strictly indoors. I have always done that
and my cats live to ripe old ages and die very happy kitties. They are well loved and
cared for. What they are not is a nuisance to my neighbours.

You do what you think is best for your kitties and don't consider other people's opinions
too much. As long as your cats are loved, cared for and happy, that's all that matters.
--
Hugs,
Lynn


*strip CLOTHES to reply*
Homepage:
http://members.shaw.ca/sewfinefashions/
See my boys: http://photos.yahoo.com/bc/papavince_29/



 




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