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Non-euthanizing groups



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 7th 03, 01:59 AM
Marty
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Default Non-euthanizing groups

A few questions:

How do shelters that don't euthanize keep the pets? Do they cut off
the amount of pets they can take in once they reach a certain point?
Are pet shelters that don't euthanize preffered over ones that do?

Thanks,
Marty
  #2  
Old October 7th 03, 03:50 PM
Sunflower
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"Marty" wrote in message
m...
A few questions:

How do shelters that don't euthanize keep the pets? Do they cut off
the amount of pets they can take in once they reach a certain point?
Are pet shelters that don't euthanize preffered over ones that do?

Thanks,
Marty


Generally, "no-kill" facilities are limited enrollment, which means that
they do not accept every animal that walks in the door. Or it means that no
"adoptible" animal is euthanized, and the criteria of "adoptibility" can be
so strict as to make 7 out of my 8 be considered "unadoptible". And, all
limiting enrollment into a "no kill" facility does is push the job of
euthanasia off onto the facilities that do have open enrollment and have to
accept all animals (like a municipal shelter). It doesn't elminate
euthanasia, just shifts the location and statistics where it occurs.
Sometimes, it leads to more animals being dumped on the roadside if there is
no other facility that can take them. The real answer isn't trumpeting "no
kill" facilities, but spaying and neutering all intact animals (free if need
be) until there is *no* "surplus" pet population.

Sunflower


  #3  
Old October 7th 03, 10:12 PM
Sharon Talbert
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All shelters and rescue orgs that foster face the same dilemma and come to
their own conclusions on what to do when presented with more animals than
they can possibly accommodate.

The so-called "no-kills" fill up quickly and become "no-accepts," turning
away all but the most "adoptable" animals. These shelters tend to be
nonprofits or privately funded who are not obligated to accept animals
they don't want. The animals rejected by the so-called "no-kill" shelter
go on to the city or county shelters (who are mandated to accept every
animal in their jurisdiction, regardless of available space) or are simply
abandoned. These publicly funded shelters then must kill animals unlikely
to find homes to make room for new arrivals.

I would venture to guess than a well operated conventional (public)
shelter saves more or at least as many lives as the so-called "no-kill"
facility. How many animals die in the process is a responsiblity shared
by both institutions; it's just that the "no-kill" gets to dodge the act
and the public shelter is stuck holding the bag (the one with a dead cat
in it).

And of course the ultimate responsibility rests squarely on the shoulders
of irresponsible pet owners.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats




On Mon, 6 Oct 2003, Marty wrote:

A few questions:

How do shelters that don't euthanize keep the pets? Do they cut off
the amount of pets they can take in once they reach a certain point?
Are pet shelters that don't euthanize preffered over ones that do?

Thanks,
Marty

  #4  
Old October 10th 03, 06:50 PM
Kalyahna
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"Sharon Talbert" wrote in message
. washington.edu...
The so-called "no-kills" fill up quickly and become "no-accepts," turning
away all but the most "adoptable" animals. These shelters tend to be
nonprofits or privately funded who are not obligated to accept animals
they don't want. The animals rejected by the so-called "no-kill" shelter
go on to the city or county shelters (who are mandated to accept every
animal in their jurisdiction, regardless of available space) or are simply
abandoned. These publicly funded shelters then must kill animals unlikely
to find homes to make room for new arrivals.

I would venture to guess than a well operated conventional (public)
shelter saves more or at least as many lives as the so-called "no-kill"
facility. How many animals die in the process is a responsiblity shared
by both institutions; it's just that the "no-kill" gets to dodge the act
and the public shelter is stuck holding the bag (the one with a dead cat
in it).


Shelters that euthanise are forced to be creative and find solutions where
it can. We're installing a Special Needs Annex (commonly called the ringworm
trailer) to treat the sudden multitude of cats that have come up positive
with the fungus, where policy used to be euthanasia. We've also just gotten
permission from the Board to do some rearranging and construction on a very
new building to create more multiple rooms for adult cats (we have somewhere
in the area of 140 cages in the building, with the original playroom capable
of housing a maximum of 16 cats, I think) along with a new isolation room.
We offer a feral program for rehabilitation or alter-and-release. We have a
huge foster program that still hasn't been large enough to accomodate this
summer's influx of cats. No matter how big the organization, though, it
seems like the problem just gets bigger... or at least no smaller. It's a
line of work that makes one feel bipolar, for all the joy and depression
that happen routinely.

And of course the ultimate responsibility rests squarely on the shoulders
of irresponsible pet owners.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats



  #5  
Old February 2nd 04, 11:28 PM
Kalyahna
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"Shaggin" wrote in message
...
I never thought of what it meant for a non-kill shelter. You have some
really good points but regardless I applaud the shelters that have this

rule
bc I believe the killing of any animals is wrong and I've been a

vegetarian
for 13 years trying to save some lives any way i can.... I just wish the
shelters were able to have more animals in there capacity.


I'll continue to applaud the shelters that euthanize, and the people that
work most directly with the animals that may or may not be there again the
next day, or after their weekend, or after a well earned vacation. It takes
a lot more courage and strength to work under such conditions than it does
to work in a facility where a person can close oneself off to the reality of
the overpopulation problem.


  #6  
Old February 4th 04, 12:54 AM
Cat Protector
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You support the shelters that euthanize? That in term says that you support
the practice of euthanasia to clear space in a shelter. I think that is
terrible. I also have to disagree with your position that those in no-kill
shelters shut themselves off to the reality of the over-population. The
shelter workers at no-kill facilities are very much aware of the problem and
should be congratulated for their hard work. It takes more guts for them to
work there than those who work at shelters who just kill off the animals to
save space. Many of the no-kills have volunteers who foster the cats in
their own homes, spend time with the felines, feed the cats, and of course
press harder to get the ones that have been in the shelter system for far
too long, adopted. No-kills will have my respect since it takes more to save
a life than to take it away.

--
Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of All Your Computer Needs!
www.members.cox.net/catprotector/panthertek

Cat Galaxy: All Cats, All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com
"Kalyahna" wrote in message
...

I'll continue to applaud the shelters that euthanize, and the people that
work most directly with the animals that may or may not be there again the
next day, or after their weekend, or after a well earned vacation. It

takes
a lot more courage and strength to work under such conditions than it does
to work in a facility where a person can close oneself off to the reality

of
the overpopulation problem.




  #7  
Old February 4th 04, 04:43 AM
Fan
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On Tue, 3 Feb 2004 17:54:35 -0700, "Cat Protector"
wrote:

You support the shelters that euthanize? That in term says that you support
the practice of euthanasia to clear space in a shelter. I think that is
terrible. I also have to disagree with your position that those in no-kill
shelters shut themselves off to the reality of the over-population. The
shelter workers at no-kill facilities are very much aware of the problem and
should be congratulated for their hard work. It takes more guts for them to
work there than those who work at shelters who just kill off the animals to
save space. Many of the no-kills have volunteers who foster the cats in
their own homes, spend time with the felines, feed the cats, and of course
press harder to get the ones that have been in the shelter system for far
too long, adopted. No-kills will have my respect since it takes more to save
a life than to take it away.


The shelters that euthanise also have dedicated volunteers who
frequently foster animals. Caring is not only for "no-kill" shelters.
What do the "no-kill" shelters do when they are completely full and
there are no more foster families availible?

The staff and volunteers at both kinds of shelters are sadly aware of
pet overpopulation and they strongly support spay and neuter. The
volunteers feed, care for, and foster just like the "no-kill"
shelters.

No one ever will "kill off the animals to save space." I normally
don't critisize posters for their opinion, but that is a terrible
thing to have said. It is totally untrue and insulting to the
dedicated people at those shelters.

Just what do you think should be done when a shelter is 100% out of
space and 100% out of foster families and all the other shelters are
also? And what do you think should be done with the animals that are
in pain and cannot be saved? What do think we should do with animals
that are too dangerous to be adopted, or even fostered when all the
behavior specialists say there is no hope for rehabilitation?

What would you do with a dog that has killed other dogs, bit multiple
people over a period of time, and has now severly injured a child. Do
you want to foster a pit bull that has been trained to kill and is out
of control?

How do your "no-kill" shelters deal with these issues? Please answer
these questions, this is not an arguement, I want to know your side of
this.


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  #8  
Old February 5th 04, 12:20 AM
Kalyahna
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"Cat Protector" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
You support the shelters that euthanize?


I work for one, and am a certified euth tech.

That in term says that you support
the practice of euthanasia to clear space in a shelter.


No. It doesn't. It means I support the euthanasia decisions of my
supervisors and coworkers. This means, as Fan said, repeat bite cases,
terminally ill cases, and cases of outstanding aggression. VERY rarely are
animals ever pulled for space, and when that comes up, it is STILL the sick
or injured or aggressive animals that are euthanized. This is because we
function as a county shelter. We MUST take in strays and hold them through
the stray period, we MUST take in protective custody animals. We have no
choice, and sometimes that means my supervisors have to make terrible
choices when we have no more foster homes and no more cages.

I also have to disagree with your position that those in no-kill
shelters shut themselves off to the reality of the over-population. The
shelter workers at no-kill facilities are very much aware of the problem

and
should be congratulated for their hard work.


I don't doubt they work hard. It was a generalization on my part, and for
that I apologize. However, it can be held as true in specifics, as you, at
least, seem to think that only no-kills do any good for the animal
population. Which is blatantly false, and you know it.

It takes more guts for them to
work there than those who work at shelters who just kill off the animals

to
save space.


CETs rate higher for compassion fatigue than nurses in emergency rooms. Not
because we feel guilty for what we do, but because we're dealing with
emotions on a staggering scale. You seem to assume that shelters that
euthanize enjoy it or take pride in it. You know how we sleep at night?
Because a pit bull who bit a child in the face cannot bite anyone else, that
a cat who aggressively attacks other cats and bites people repeatedly will
scar no other cats and no other people, that a tumor-infested rat will be at
peace. And when my cats grow old and start to fail (not for another 10+
years, if I have my way), I will schedule appointments at my humane society
and hold them while they go to sleep. I will KNOW the effectiveness of the
methods used, and I will know that whoever does the injection understands my
grief and grieves with me. Contrary to what you seem to think, I have NEVER
worked with more compassionate and generously spirited people.

Many of the no-kills have volunteers who foster the cats in
their own homes,


Really? I foster. Every full time employee in the kennel department who is
capable of it fosters. One of them has a litter of kittens and a blind dog
as fosters, and two dogs of her own. Another has two cats, both of which
she's adopting. One of them does reptile rescue. One of them does rabbit
fostering. One of them fosters semi-ferals. We ALL foster for space reasons.

spend time with the felines,


The front office comes to us with recommendations for placement, or to ask
where a certain cat is. My supervisors listen when we mention petrified cats
that are coming around, the foster coordinator takes seriously our
suggestions for adult cats in need of foster care.

feed the cats, and of course
press harder to get the ones that have been in the shelter system for far
too long, adopted.


Really? You think so? So THAT's why we had that whole Top Ten thing... and
the radio and TV spots... and the satellite centers in a local pet store
chain...
So sorry that any euthanizing shelters with which you've had contact were
****ty conveyor belts of dead animals. But those shelters aren't everywhere.
And they sure as hell don't employ myself or my friends.

No-kills will have my respect since it takes more to save
a life than to take it away.


Ah. We're all dead inside. Uncaring and terrible people. *sarcasm* You do my
job for a week, friend, and we'll see how much you find it takes.

-Kal


  #9  
Old February 5th 04, 08:48 PM
Sharon Talbert
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Kal, I hope you stay with this newsgroup and that you never allow your
voice to be stilled. I admire the work of most private shelters and
always will, but I am very sorry the blurry term of "no-kill" was ever
invented. Better for all facilities to agree to "low-kill" (with an
actual definition of the term to work from) and for private and public
shelters to work together toward a common goal: that of educating the
public to spay and neuter and to adopt for life.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats

  #10  
Old February 5th 04, 08:55 PM
Sharon Talbert
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Fan, I admire your posting on the subject of euthanasia and "no-kill"
shelters. Do you work in a public shelter or a private shelter that
assumes the responsibility of euthanasia as necessary?

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
 




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