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No Help Available For Ferals?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 25th 04, 07:09 PM
Robyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default No Help Available For Ferals?

Hi,
This is more of a vent than anything else, and this group seems like
the right place for it. Who knows, maybe you guys can offer suggestions.
I've just spent my entire morning trying to get trapping and spay/neuter
information for the 4 feral cats (all one litter) that came along with
the house we just bought. I don't mind feeding the cats and having them
around, but the females just had their first heat, and are most likely
already pregnant. The mother of this group, after disappearing for a
long time, has also reappeared and is obviously nursing a new litter.
(Whole other problem, but one thing at a time.)

Called the Humane Society, they said to call Wildlife Care, Wildlife
Care said to call the Humane Society, who then said it just wasn't their
problem because the cats weren't pets and to call Animal control. Animal
Control said it wasn't their problem unless I wanted to trap the cats
myself, which I can't do. They then offered to rent me a trap for a $100
deposit + rent, which I don't have. (Even if I did trap them, they just
wanted to haul them off to be euthanized, which isn't an option.) I flat
out asked the guy at Animal Control if no one cared if these 4 cats just
bred themselves into the hundreds, and he said no. (NOT kidding.)

So the long and short of it is, no one will even discuss the matter
unless I pay a fee and deliver the cats to them. These things are
totally wild. Even if I could afford the $250 or so the entire
undertaking would cost, and manage to trap them, what do I do with them
until the vet appointment? No one I've asked seems to have answers. I've
already adopted the runt from this group. He's pretty wild, but likes
living in the house and gets along well with my other 3 cats. I wish I
could take them all in, but they're just too wild, and I don't have any
more room. The 4 I have now are a bit much at times. :-)

Anyway, thanks for letting me vent. I guess I need to get back on the
phone and try a few more places. It's just unreal that all these
organizations that talk about how much they want to help unwanted
animals lose interest when you actually ask them for assistance. But
there's got to be some place that helps with these things. Suggestions
welcome. Wish me luck. :-)

Robyn
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.


  #2  
Old March 25th 04, 08:32 PM
Lotte
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Robyn --

What, specifically, do you want from the agencies you are calling? The more
specific you can be, the more they can help you. I can't really tell from
your e.mail what strategy you want to take with these cats. Do you want
someone to come and trap them, and take them in for neutering? If so, and
you're anywhere near Austin (Texas), I can do it, just drop me an e.mail.
After they are neutered, do you want to release them, or do you want to try
to get them adopted? With ferals, if they truly *are* feral (i.e., wild as
all get-out), it's probably better to release them after they are neutuered.
Once they've gone wild, they don't make great pets, but they can survive
quite well if you'll keep feeding them.

There is a wealth of information at Alley Cat Allies' web site
(http://www.alleycat.org/) about trap-neuter-release of feral cats. If you
let me know where you're located, I may be able to put you in touch with a
local feral-friendly person who can help.

Lotte


"Robyn" wrote in message
t...
Hi,
This is more of a vent than anything else, and this group seems like
the right place for it. Who knows, maybe you guys can offer suggestions.
I've just spent my entire morning trying to get trapping and spay/neuter
information for the 4 feral cats (all one litter) that came along with
the house we just bought. I don't mind feeding the cats and having them
around, but the females just had their first heat, and are most likely
already pregnant. The mother of this group, after disappearing for a
long time, has also reappeared and is obviously nursing a new litter.
(Whole other problem, but one thing at a time.)

Called the Humane Society, they said to call Wildlife Care, Wildlife
Care said to call the Humane Society, who then said it just wasn't their
problem because the cats weren't pets and to call Animal control. Animal
Control said it wasn't their problem unless I wanted to trap the cats
myself, which I can't do. They then offered to rent me a trap for a $100
deposit + rent, which I don't have. (Even if I did trap them, they just
wanted to haul them off to be euthanized, which isn't an option.) I flat
out asked the guy at Animal Control if no one cared if these 4 cats just
bred themselves into the hundreds, and he said no. (NOT kidding.)

So the long and short of it is, no one will even discuss the matter
unless I pay a fee and deliver the cats to them. These things are
totally wild. Even if I could afford the $250 or so the entire
undertaking would cost, and manage to trap them, what do I do with them
until the vet appointment? No one I've asked seems to have answers. I've
already adopted the runt from this group. He's pretty wild, but likes
living in the house and gets along well with my other 3 cats. I wish I
could take them all in, but they're just too wild, and I don't have any
more room. The 4 I have now are a bit much at times. :-)

Anyway, thanks for letting me vent. I guess I need to get back on the
phone and try a few more places. It's just unreal that all these
organizations that talk about how much they want to help unwanted
animals lose interest when you actually ask them for assistance. But
there's got to be some place that helps with these things. Suggestions
welcome. Wish me luck. :-)

Robyn
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.




  #3  
Old March 25th 04, 09:12 PM
Robyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Lotte wrote:
Robyn --

What, specifically, do you want from the agencies you are calling?
The more specific you can be, the more they can help you. I can't
really tell from your e.mail what strategy you want to take with
these cats. Do you want someone to come and trap them, and take them
in for neutering? If so, and you're anywhere near Austin (Texas), I
can do it, just drop me an e.mail. After they are neutered, do you
want to release them, or do you want to try to get them adopted?
With ferals, if they truly *are* feral (i.e., wild as all get-out),
it's probably better to release them after they are neutuered. Once
they've gone wild, they don't make great pets, but they can survive
quite well if you'll keep feeding them.

There is a wealth of information at Alley Cat Allies' web site
(http://www.alleycat.org/) about trap-neuter-release of feral cats.
If you let me know where you're located, I may be able to put you in
touch with a local feral-friendly person who can help.

Lotte


Sorry if my email wasn't clear. I'm kind of upset at the telephone
runaround I keep getting. The cats are truly wild and hiss when
approached, even when we feed them, so I doubt they're adoptable. But I
don't mind feeding them or having them around, I just can't have them
multiplying all over everything, so I need help with the trapping and
fixing. Unfortunataly, I'm not in Texas, but south Florida, or I'd
happily take you up on your offer. My S/O suggested that maybe we can
try to at least get the females by luring them into our cat carrier, tie
a string to the door and hide or something. I think it might work
once... But what do you do with them until the vet appointment, don't
they go nuts when confined? The last cat I had fixed through a low cost
service was a 3 day wait, but he was a tame pet, so no problem.

Anyway, thanks for the response. I think the next call I make and
hear, "Well, first you have to buy a trap" or "We only help pets" I'm
going to scream...

Robyn


  #4  
Old March 25th 04, 10:00 PM
Sharon Talbert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Robyn, there may be a rescue org in your area (and it would be helpful if
you revealed to the group where you are), but chances are good that you
are going to have to take care of this little colony yourself. And you
need to move fast!

You need a livetrap or two (buy them; they are not all that expensive, and
it is going to take a few weeks to get the colony in hand). Find a
low-cost spay/neuter service (talk to your vet first; maybe you can work
out a discount) and get to work. Start with last year's kittens; they are
pregnant now and the sooner spayed the better for all. If you can locate
the old cat's litter, bring them in and trap the mom. She can raise her
babies in a cage or secure room until they are 4 weeks or so (when they
can be started on solid food) and then be spayed and released.

Let us know where you are. There just may be a spay/neuter clinic in your
area. Seattle, for example, has a free feral cat clinic for all comers.

Thank you for being so kind and responsible. I wish everyone were like
you.

Email me privately if you would like to discuss any of this. I am always
happy to advise.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats

  #5  
Old March 25th 04, 11:09 PM
Robyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sharon Talbert wrote:
Robyn, there may be a rescue org in your area (and it would be
helpful if you revealed to the group where you are), but chances are
good that you are going to have to take care of this little colony
yourself. And you need to move fast!

You need a livetrap or two (buy them; they are not all that
expensive, and it is going to take a few weeks to get the colony in
hand). Find a low-cost spay/neuter service (talk to your vet first;
maybe you can work out a discount) and get to work. Start with last
year's kittens; they are pregnant now and the sooner spayed the
better for all. If you can locate the old cat's litter, bring them
in and trap the mom. She can raise her babies in a cage or secure
room until they are 4 weeks or so (when they can be started on solid
food) and then be spayed and released.

Let us know where you are. There just may be a spay/neuter clinic in
your area. Seattle, for example, has a free feral cat clinic for all
comers.

Thank you for being so kind and responsible. I wish everyone were
like you.

Email me privately if you would like to discuss any of this. I am
always happy to advise.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats


Sharon thanks for your reply. As I stated in my post, I just don't
have the cash to do this myself, or I would. That's why I was venting. I
need help and can't find any. A trap is $50-$75. Spay/neuter is $25-$35
times 4 cats. (5 when you count the one I took in the house.) I also
don't have a clue how to go about this, or a lot of free time, truth be
told. I'm online a lot because I make my living on the computer and can
post in between other things.

As for the kittens, I can't get to them, chances are they're in
someone's yard, and everyone around here has fences. There's nothing I
can do until she brings them out, and even then, I don't have a place
for them. I made room for one of the ferals that was smaller and weaker
than the rest (cross-eyed little thing, just adorable), but that brings
me up to four, and my house is small... I also have a 19 year old cat
that is only now getting over the stress of our adding a new cat last
year. (What a nightmare that was.) She's OK with little Froggy so far,
but I don't want to push it by adding more.

I agree that the pregnant females are the first priority. Like I
said, I may try to trap one in my cat carrier, (not real hopeful) but I
don't know what to do after that. I spent most of this morning on the
phone, and everyone says it's someone else's problem, or that no help is
available. (without lots of $$$$) I was under the impression that there
were places that would lend traps and help with the trapping, as well as
assisting with the spay/neuter arrangements. It looks like I was wrong,
but I'm going to try a little more. Tomorrow I'll start on the phone
again. Thanks for the kind words.:-)

Robyn

P.S. I'm in Hollywood, Florida, BTW. That's just south of Ft.
Lauderdale.
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.


  #6  
Old March 26th 04, 01:51 AM
Sharon Talbert
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Robyn, try this URL:

www.thecatnetwork.org

They are based out of Miami, if that helps. They might at least be able
to put you in touch with someone who can help. Don't give up networking!
But be prepared to do most of the work yourself, even if you find help
with the expenses.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
Seattle
  #7  
Old March 26th 04, 02:22 AM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

have you checked http://www.petfinder.org/ ? Click on find shelters, enter
your zip code and they will list organizations in your area.

Check with some of them. You'll probably find someone to help with a trap,
neuter and release.

W

"Robyn" wrote in message
...


Sharon Talbert wrote:
Robyn, there may be a rescue org in your area (and it would be
helpful if you revealed to the group where you are), but chances are
good that you are going to have to take care of this little colony
yourself. And you need to move fast!

You need a livetrap or two (buy them; they are not all that
expensive, and it is going to take a few weeks to get the colony in
hand). Find a low-cost spay/neuter service (talk to your vet first;
maybe you can work out a discount) and get to work. Start with last
year's kittens; they are pregnant now and the sooner spayed the
better for all. If you can locate the old cat's litter, bring them
in and trap the mom. She can raise her babies in a cage or secure
room until they are 4 weeks or so (when they can be started on solid
food) and then be spayed and released.

Let us know where you are. There just may be a spay/neuter clinic in
your area. Seattle, for example, has a free feral cat clinic for all
comers.

Thank you for being so kind and responsible. I wish everyone were
like you.

Email me privately if you would like to discuss any of this. I am
always happy to advise.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats


Sharon thanks for your reply. As I stated in my post, I just don't
have the cash to do this myself, or I would. That's why I was venting. I
need help and can't find any. A trap is $50-$75. Spay/neuter is $25-$35
times 4 cats. (5 when you count the one I took in the house.) I also
don't have a clue how to go about this, or a lot of free time, truth be
told. I'm online a lot because I make my living on the computer and can
post in between other things.

As for the kittens, I can't get to them, chances are they're in
someone's yard, and everyone around here has fences. There's nothing I
can do until she brings them out, and even then, I don't have a place
for them. I made room for one of the ferals that was smaller and weaker
than the rest (cross-eyed little thing, just adorable), but that brings
me up to four, and my house is small... I also have a 19 year old cat
that is only now getting over the stress of our adding a new cat last
year. (What a nightmare that was.) She's OK with little Froggy so far,
but I don't want to push it by adding more.

I agree that the pregnant females are the first priority. Like I
said, I may try to trap one in my cat carrier, (not real hopeful) but I
don't know what to do after that. I spent most of this morning on the
phone, and everyone says it's someone else's problem, or that no help is
available. (without lots of $$$$) I was under the impression that there
were places that would lend traps and help with the trapping, as well as
assisting with the spay/neuter arrangements. It looks like I was wrong,
but I'm going to try a little more. Tomorrow I'll start on the phone
again. Thanks for the kind words.:-)

Robyn

P.S. I'm in Hollywood, Florida, BTW. That's just south of Ft.
Lauderdale.
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.




  #8  
Old March 26th 04, 07:09 AM
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article ,
"Robyn" wrote:

P.S. I'm in Hollywood, Florida, BTW. That's just south of Ft.
Lauderdale.


You could try these guys (I found them through Google):

http://www.catpals.org/

"Cat Pals - A Feline Charity in South Florida
A non profit charity that works off donations and fundrasing and is a
volunteer based to feed and get medical attention to all ferel cats in
the hollywood beach area in south Florida."

The page also talks about a vet named Dr. James Dee of Hollywood Animal
Hospital who believes in trap/neuter/release. Try contacting that clinic
or other vets in your area. They may be able to supply you with lots of
help and info. Good luck Robyn, you're helping put humpty back together
again.
  #9  
Old March 26th 04, 01:58 PM
Robyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



lid wrote:
In article ,
"Robyn" wrote:

P.S. I'm in Hollywood, Florida, BTW. That's just south of Ft.
Lauderdale.


You could try these guys (I found them through Google):

http://www.catpals.org/

"Cat Pals - A Feline Charity in South Florida
A non profit charity that works off donations and fundrasing and is a
volunteer based to feed and get medical attention to all ferel cats in
the hollywood beach area in south Florida."

The page also talks about a vet named Dr. James Dee of Hollywood
Animal Hospital who believes in trap/neuter/release. Try contacting
that clinic or other vets in your area. They may be able to supply
you with lots of help and info. Good luck Robyn, you're helping put
humpty back together again.


Yes, I had found them yesterday, thanks. So far all I get is an
answering maching. But they have the one huge colony they take care of,
and that's all they do. I doubt they can assist, although maybe someone
will be able to advise. :-)

Thanks,
Robyn
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.


  #10  
Old March 26th 04, 02:23 PM
Robyn
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Sharon Talbert wrote:
Robyn, try this URL:

www.thecatnetwork.org

They are based out of Miami, if that helps. They might at least be
able to put you in touch with someone who can help. Don't give up
networking! But be prepared to do most of the work yourself, even if
you find help with the expenses.

Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
Seattle


Thanks Sharon, I'll take a look, but Miami is a different county and
quite a distance. (I don't have easy transportation.) Still, you never
know.

I'd still like to know what to do with the cat if I'm lucky enough to
catch one in my carrier? Will it be calm until an appointment can be
arranged, or go ballistic? Also, how fast do these cats tame down?
They're always wanting to get in the house. They know their brother's in
there, and they're friends with my big male, Squidly. If I just let them
in on the porch, would they adjust enough within a couple of weeks to be
handled so I could transport them? I could probably afford to fix a cat
every week or two until they're done... Maybe that's a bad idea, I don't
know. Hopefully today's phone calls will yield some help. :-)

My S/O is now telling me we should just say the hell with it and take
all four of them in. ACK! Even with only 4, I can't sit down without
shooing a cat. I had to chase one out of the bathtub to take a shower
this morning. (The water tastes better than what's in the dish,
apparently.) Last week I woke up with a weight on my chest and a tail in
my mouth. I can't imagine having 8, especially with 5 of them being wild
things. I think my S/O needs his meds adjusted. :-)

Anyway, I'm rambling. Thanks for the advise, I'm going to see if I
can't get something done today, or at least form a plan.

Take care,
Robyn
--
To avoid grizzlies, the Alaska Department of Fish & Game advises hikers
to wear noisy little bells on clothes and carry pepper spray. Also watch
for signs of activity: Black bear scat is smaller and contains berries;
grizzly scat has little bells in it and smells like pepper.


 




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