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MUST give away Tonkinese!



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 29th 04, 09:48 PM
Phil
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Default MUST give away Tonkinese!

We have a Tonkinese female, about 6 years old, that we absolutely must get
out of the house. We want her to have a good home, but the Tonkinese rescue
group has not been responsive, despite repeated efforts for their help. The
cat must go. She urinates huge amounts of urine periodically, so she must
be confined where she can not destroy property. She is housed in a room and
gets attention, but she can not be a member of this household. The vet says
she is healthy. This last time, the cat jumped on our bed like she always
does, ambled over to us as my wife and I lay under the covers, and as she
walked across the bed, unloaded a 2 foot long mass of urine, spreading to
half a foot wide, and in a manner of minutes, soaked through a comforter,
electric blanket, two sheets, and partially into a brand new mattress.
Luckily, I saved the mattress. The cat will do these kinds of things,
within 10 feet of perfectly clean cat box. She will do it if people are
home or not. We can not establish any pattern. Typically happens once
every few weeks.

We have made the decision to relinquish ownership. She has papers. I just
want to make sure she has a good home, that can deal with her unusual
behaviors. The cat is otherwise just fine, affectionate, playful (loves
chasing laser pointer dot, keeping away from eyes), eats well, etc.. Has
all claws, but is spayed. Tolerates our 13 year old, laid back Dalmatian,
but the cat is more fearful of her than she needs to be. The dog could care
less about the cat.

If anyone can direct me to someone who can help with rescue, I would
appreciate it. We live in the San Francisco bay area.

Thanks,

- Phil


  #2  
Old June 30th 04, 04:48 AM
Sunflower
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Phil" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
We have a Tonkinese female, about 6 years old, that we absolutely must get
out of the house. We want her to have a good home, but the Tonkinese

rescue
group has not been responsive, despite repeated efforts for their help.

The
cat must go. She urinates huge amounts of urine periodically, so she must
be confined where she can not destroy property. She is housed in a room

and
gets attention, but she can not be a member of this household. The vet

says
she is healthy. This last time, the cat jumped on our bed like she always
does, ambled over to us as my wife and I lay under the covers, and as she
walked across the bed, unloaded a 2 foot long mass of urine, spreading to
half a foot wide, and in a manner of minutes, soaked through a comforter,
electric blanket, two sheets, and partially into a brand new mattress.
Luckily, I saved the mattress. The cat will do these kinds of things,
within 10 feet of perfectly clean cat box. She will do it if people are
home or not. We can not establish any pattern. Typically happens once
every few weeks.

We have made the decision to relinquish ownership. She has papers. I

just
want to make sure she has a good home, that can deal with her unusual
behaviors. The cat is otherwise just fine, affectionate, playful (loves
chasing laser pointer dot, keeping away from eyes), eats well, etc.. Has
all claws, but is spayed. Tolerates our 13 year old, laid back Dalmatian,
but the cat is more fearful of her than she needs to be. The dog could

care
less about the cat.

If anyone can direct me to someone who can help with rescue, I would
appreciate it. We live in the San Francisco bay area.

Thanks,

- Phil




This is not the description of a cat that is easily rehomed. I can see why
rescue hasn't gotten back to you. Most likely given her history, she will
be euthanized or cruelly spend the rest of her life in a small cage if they
even take her. If you have any affection for this animal, then take her in
to the vet yourself and have her euthanized. I understand why she can't be
a part of your family, but no other family is going to want her either. You
owe it to her to make sure her last moments on earth are with the family she
knows and loves now. I know it's hard for you to euthanize her, but it's
part of the bargain you made when you gave her a home in the first place.
If you cannot provide her with a good life, at least provide her with a good
death.




  #3  
Old June 30th 04, 04:48 AM
Sunflower
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Phil" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
We have a Tonkinese female, about 6 years old, that we absolutely must get
out of the house. We want her to have a good home, but the Tonkinese

rescue
group has not been responsive, despite repeated efforts for their help.

The
cat must go. She urinates huge amounts of urine periodically, so she must
be confined where she can not destroy property. She is housed in a room

and
gets attention, but she can not be a member of this household. The vet

says
she is healthy. This last time, the cat jumped on our bed like she always
does, ambled over to us as my wife and I lay under the covers, and as she
walked across the bed, unloaded a 2 foot long mass of urine, spreading to
half a foot wide, and in a manner of minutes, soaked through a comforter,
electric blanket, two sheets, and partially into a brand new mattress.
Luckily, I saved the mattress. The cat will do these kinds of things,
within 10 feet of perfectly clean cat box. She will do it if people are
home or not. We can not establish any pattern. Typically happens once
every few weeks.

We have made the decision to relinquish ownership. She has papers. I

just
want to make sure she has a good home, that can deal with her unusual
behaviors. The cat is otherwise just fine, affectionate, playful (loves
chasing laser pointer dot, keeping away from eyes), eats well, etc.. Has
all claws, but is spayed. Tolerates our 13 year old, laid back Dalmatian,
but the cat is more fearful of her than she needs to be. The dog could

care
less about the cat.

If anyone can direct me to someone who can help with rescue, I would
appreciate it. We live in the San Francisco bay area.

Thanks,

- Phil




This is not the description of a cat that is easily rehomed. I can see why
rescue hasn't gotten back to you. Most likely given her history, she will
be euthanized or cruelly spend the rest of her life in a small cage if they
even take her. If you have any affection for this animal, then take her in
to the vet yourself and have her euthanized. I understand why she can't be
a part of your family, but no other family is going to want her either. You
owe it to her to make sure her last moments on earth are with the family she
knows and loves now. I know it's hard for you to euthanize her, but it's
part of the bargain you made when you gave her a home in the first place.
If you cannot provide her with a good life, at least provide her with a good
death.




  #4  
Old June 30th 04, 07:43 AM
Luvskats00
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Bless you for trying to find a home for this special needs cat. Perhaps there
is a medical problem..or it is behavioral. Can you get the vet to rule out a
medical disability? If so, then maybe a cat behaviorist can help you work out
this problem. A feline behaviorist is either a vet of a PHD who has devoted a
career to cat behavior. I adopted a 6 year old spayed female last September
(already having a then 4 year old neutered male). For 3 months, she urinated
and deficated on the bedroom floor and on my bed. I was at my wits end. I
showered her with attention AND experimented with different litters. My cats
had been using newspapers (not litter) for years. Since she didn't care for
newspapers, I tried Fresh Step, store brand litter, and finally, Feline Pine.
She loves Feline Pine (my other cat doesn't care for it) and uses the box all
the time now.

If none of this is of interest, then please try to locate local cat rescue
groups (I live in NY and found 3-4 groups through Petco. They work with them
and showcase adoptable cats in their retail stores.) Also, put up a flyer with
local vets....This may be a special needs kitty..maybe not. Also, check with
petfinder.com. I don't know if this website accepts private listings, but if
you do a general search via location/cats, you will locate some local rescue
groups in your area..maybe they can take your cat or post a listing while you
play forster parent. Much good luck to you.
  #5  
Old June 30th 04, 07:43 AM
Luvskats00
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Bless you for trying to find a home for this special needs cat. Perhaps there
is a medical problem..or it is behavioral. Can you get the vet to rule out a
medical disability? If so, then maybe a cat behaviorist can help you work out
this problem. A feline behaviorist is either a vet of a PHD who has devoted a
career to cat behavior. I adopted a 6 year old spayed female last September
(already having a then 4 year old neutered male). For 3 months, she urinated
and deficated on the bedroom floor and on my bed. I was at my wits end. I
showered her with attention AND experimented with different litters. My cats
had been using newspapers (not litter) for years. Since she didn't care for
newspapers, I tried Fresh Step, store brand litter, and finally, Feline Pine.
She loves Feline Pine (my other cat doesn't care for it) and uses the box all
the time now.

If none of this is of interest, then please try to locate local cat rescue
groups (I live in NY and found 3-4 groups through Petco. They work with them
and showcase adoptable cats in their retail stores.) Also, put up a flyer with
local vets....This may be a special needs kitty..maybe not. Also, check with
petfinder.com. I don't know if this website accepts private listings, but if
you do a general search via location/cats, you will locate some local rescue
groups in your area..maybe they can take your cat or post a listing while you
play forster parent. Much good luck to you.
  #6  
Old June 30th 04, 12:30 PM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Phil" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
We have a Tonkinese female, about 6 years old, that we absolutely must get
out of the house. We want her to have a good home, but the Tonkinese

rescue
group has not been responsive, despite repeated efforts for their help.

The
cat must go. She urinates huge amounts of urine periodically, so she must
be confined where she can not destroy property. She is housed in a room

and
gets attention, but she can not be a member of this household. The vet

says
she is healthy. This last time, the cat jumped on our bed like she always
does, ambled over to us as my wife and I lay under the covers, and as she
walked across the bed, unloaded a 2 foot long mass of urine, spreading to
half a foot wide, and in a manner of minutes, soaked through a comforter,
electric blanket, two sheets, and partially into a brand new mattress.
Luckily, I saved the mattress. The cat will do these kinds of things,
within 10 feet of perfectly clean cat box. She will do it if people are
home or not. We can not establish any pattern. Typically happens once
every few weeks.

We have made the decision to relinquish ownership. She has papers. I

just
want to make sure she has a good home, that can deal with her unusual
behaviors. The cat is otherwise just fine, affectionate, playful (loves
chasing laser pointer dot, keeping away from eyes), eats well, etc.. Has
all claws, but is spayed. Tolerates our 13 year old, laid back Dalmatian,
but the cat is more fearful of her than she needs to be. The dog could

care
less about the cat.

If anyone can direct me to someone who can help with rescue, I would
appreciate it. We live in the San Francisco bay area.

Thanks,

- Phil



Did the vet do blood work and urine testing?

You didn't say how long you've had this cat. Is she recently adopted or have
you had her since kittenhood and this is a recent development? If the later
has something changed around your home?

If a medical problem has been completely ruled out then you have a
behavioral problem. You haven't said what you've tried to change this
behavior so I'll just throw out some thoughts.

Because of the quantity of urine you describe it almost sounds like she
holds her urine until she can't any longer. She might be afraid to use the
box or not like something about the box.

You could try Cat Attract litter http://www.preciouscat.com/ or just try
different textures/materials, scented/un-scented.

If you use a covered box, uncover it. If it isn't covered try a covered one.

The box might be in an area where there is too much traffic (human or
canine). She might be happier with a more private location. Make sure the
box isn't too close to her food.

If she poops in the box but won't urinate in it she might not like doing
both in the same box. You could try setting up a second box.

She might be stressed by the dog or any number of other things. You may want
to try a Feliway diffuser. Feliway puts pheromes into the air that can calm
the cat.

I hope you can find a solution to her problem because she will be almost
impossible to rehome unless this issue can be resolved.

Good Luck! I do understand your frustration.

W


  #7  
Old June 30th 04, 12:30 PM
Wendy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Phil" wrote in message
news:[email protected]_s52...
We have a Tonkinese female, about 6 years old, that we absolutely must get
out of the house. We want her to have a good home, but the Tonkinese

rescue
group has not been responsive, despite repeated efforts for their help.

The
cat must go. She urinates huge amounts of urine periodically, so she must
be confined where she can not destroy property. She is housed in a room

and
gets attention, but she can not be a member of this household. The vet

says
she is healthy. This last time, the cat jumped on our bed like she always
does, ambled over to us as my wife and I lay under the covers, and as she
walked across the bed, unloaded a 2 foot long mass of urine, spreading to
half a foot wide, and in a manner of minutes, soaked through a comforter,
electric blanket, two sheets, and partially into a brand new mattress.
Luckily, I saved the mattress. The cat will do these kinds of things,
within 10 feet of perfectly clean cat box. She will do it if people are
home or not. We can not establish any pattern. Typically happens once
every few weeks.

We have made the decision to relinquish ownership. She has papers. I

just
want to make sure she has a good home, that can deal with her unusual
behaviors. The cat is otherwise just fine, affectionate, playful (loves
chasing laser pointer dot, keeping away from eyes), eats well, etc.. Has
all claws, but is spayed. Tolerates our 13 year old, laid back Dalmatian,
but the cat is more fearful of her than she needs to be. The dog could

care
less about the cat.

If anyone can direct me to someone who can help with rescue, I would
appreciate it. We live in the San Francisco bay area.

Thanks,

- Phil



Did the vet do blood work and urine testing?

You didn't say how long you've had this cat. Is she recently adopted or have
you had her since kittenhood and this is a recent development? If the later
has something changed around your home?

If a medical problem has been completely ruled out then you have a
behavioral problem. You haven't said what you've tried to change this
behavior so I'll just throw out some thoughts.

Because of the quantity of urine you describe it almost sounds like she
holds her urine until she can't any longer. She might be afraid to use the
box or not like something about the box.

You could try Cat Attract litter http://www.preciouscat.com/ or just try
different textures/materials, scented/un-scented.

If you use a covered box, uncover it. If it isn't covered try a covered one.

The box might be in an area where there is too much traffic (human or
canine). She might be happier with a more private location. Make sure the
box isn't too close to her food.

If she poops in the box but won't urinate in it she might not like doing
both in the same box. You could try setting up a second box.

She might be stressed by the dog or any number of other things. You may want
to try a Feliway diffuser. Feliway puts pheromes into the air that can calm
the cat.

I hope you can find a solution to her problem because she will be almost
impossible to rehome unless this issue can be resolved.

Good Luck! I do understand your frustration.

W


  #8  
Old June 30th 04, 02:02 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sunflower wrote:
snip
Recommending euthanasia without even getting details of what has been
done so far is unconscionable and reprehensible. The owner hasn't even
tried medication, which cures the majority of cats with this issue, and
it also should be noted that this behavior happens once every few weeks,
which makes the likelihood of correcting this problem even better.
Telling him to kill the cat is disgusting on your part.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


  #9  
Old June 30th 04, 02:02 PM
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Sunflower wrote:
snip
Recommending euthanasia without even getting details of what has been
done so far is unconscionable and reprehensible. The owner hasn't even
tried medication, which cures the majority of cats with this issue, and
it also should be noted that this behavior happens once every few weeks,
which makes the likelihood of correcting this problem even better.
Telling him to kill the cat is disgusting on your part.

Megan



"The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do
nothing."

-Edmund Burke

Learn The TRUTH About Declawing
http://www.stopdeclaw.com

Zuzu's Cats Photo Album:
http://www.PictureTrail.com/zuzu22

"Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one
elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and
splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then
providence moves too. A whole stream of events issues from the decision,
raising in one's favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and
material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his
way."

- W.H. Murray


  #10  
Old June 30th 04, 05:43 PM
Sunflower
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default


wrote in message
...
Sunflower wrote:
snip
Recommending euthanasia without even getting details of what has been
done so far is unconscionable and reprehensible. The owner hasn't even
tried medication, which cures the majority of cats with this issue, and
it also should be noted that this behavior happens once every few weeks,
which makes the likelihood of correcting this problem even better.
Telling him to kill the cat is disgusting on your part.

Megan




No, it's reality. I'm sorry if you don't like it. THe OP wants to rehome
the cat. Period. He wasn't looking for suggestions as to try to deal with
the problem. He "says" the vet found no problems, and although I don't know
what types of testing the OP had done, at this point, it doesn't matter. He
wants the cat gone. And as far as "medication" to cure the anxiety
urination issues, it only works about 20% of the time. Yes, I know from
personal experience on that one, as well as working with our Humane Society.

There isn't one single sane person on the planet who *wants* to live in a
home with a cat peeing all over it. Sure, we do sometimes when we think
it's a short term issue that can be cured, but other than making the cat
live in isolation in a room fully able to be washed down and disinfected
constantly, there has to be some sort of progress in the behavior for it to
be at all tolerated. We share our homes with animals on the expectation
that they will modify their natural instincts somewhat to suit our human
fastidiousness. If the animal can't adapt to being in a home, then all that
is left is being outside, euthanasia, or life in a cage. A good death is
preferable to a bad life in my opinion and I consider a life spent in a cage
a bad life.

So the truth is, you have a unadoptible animal to anyone who knows the
story. What is going to happen to this animal? He'll dump it off at the
shelter where it'll be euthanized by strangers or someone else picks the
animal out not knowing the past behavior to give a home to and starts to
experience the same behavior, and repeats the cycle. How cruel to the cat
is that?

Better to accept the full responsibility of pet ownership and have the
animal euthanized than to pass the problem along to strangers and totally
traumatize the cat in it's last moments.


 




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